Should I give a two weeks' notice?

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neuron

553 Posts

Has 5 years experience.

Thank you everyone for your replies. I will update ASAP. 

Specializes in Emergency Pediatric Care.

I’ve left on a short notice because it was a dangerous working environment and felt that my certification was at stake. My manager also forced me to work a 16 hour shift (was supposed to be 12) even though I had to pick up my baby from childcare because she threatened to report me to BON for abandoning patients if I left. It was something that happened frequently because the oncoming staff knew we’d have to stay so they would habitually come in 2-4 hours late so they didn’t have to get the patients ready for the day. These people were friends with the manager so they’d never get punished. Me not being able to pick up my child was the last straw and I quit at the end of that shift. 

I have to answer for that in interviews but they’ve always been understanding when I say the ratios were so unsafe that patients were being harmed and admin wouldn’t do anything to accommodate. I’ve actually gotten every job I’ve interviewed for despite this. 

Use your best judgment. Are you being forced into unsafe situations? Are they then threatening to report you to BON if you don’t comply? Or are they just a**holes with a bad attitude? 

Always give the required amount of notice, usually 2 weeks.

That doesn't mean you can't call off a couple of times during those 2 weeks.  And you could always fall ill if they try to force you to work OT, as long as  you haven't refused before.

don't say anything in your resignation that you might come to regret. 

Just say that you are hereby giving notice of your intent to resign.  (You can say for personal reasons or something else nebulous, like to spend more time with my family or something similar.)   My last day of work will be _______.  I have enjoyed working at ___________ and have learned a great deal.  Thank you.

Sincerely, 

your name and title.

Some places might not even want much notice, might let you use up your sick time, saved holidays, PTO, etc.

I hope you haven't been verbalizing your upset with the employer to anyone.  Here's wishing you all the best.

 

Has 16 years experience.

Because they would give you 2 weeks notice if they didn't like you.  I've never given 2 weeks notice and never had an issue.  I don't use my manager as a reference I use a coworker.  But where we're at post covid, they aren't even checking references.  They are verifying that you actually have hospital experience by doing a background check.  They made me submit a paystub and a w-2 from my last job, they never called them.

Has 16 years experience.

2 werks is a waste of time.  Period.  They will never be able to replace you in 2 weeks.  Maybe in 6 months.  If you wanna give 6 months notice.  2 weeks is a slap in the face.

Has 43 years experience.

It's best to do what you can to not burn bridges, and at the same time, a toxic work environment can really wear on your physical and mental health. 

At the very least, put your two week notice in.

I wish you all the best on your next job.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

3,729 Posts

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 21 years experience.

If you've stuck it out for over a year unless the current situation is actually dangerous you can stick it out for two more weeks.  There's very few situations where leaving without notice is acceptable.  Even if you leave with no notice for a good reason getting to the point where you can explain why to a potential employer isn't guaranteed as being on their do not rehire list will very possibly knock you out of the running for for other jobs before you even get to the interview stage where you'd have the chance to explain yourself. 

Especially in the current environment of  huge health care conglomerates owning everything leaving without notice if you work for a big company could definitely have a negative impact on your future employment prospects. Being listed as not eligible for rehire takes you out of the running for any job at any facility the employer owns.

Even if you don't work for one of the big companies leaving your current job without notice will definitely cause them to give you a negative reference.  As you have been there  over a year and this is  your first nursing job you'll need to put it on your resume.  Having a negative reference from your one nursing job won't leave a good impression on a potential future employer. 

Unless you already have a firm job offer in hand leaving your current job without notice could definitely have a negative impact on your job search. Even if you have an offer on the table leaving a job without notice could still affect your future  employment prospects. 

Even years down the road every job application will want your employment history. Even when your job history is stable and has enough longevity to leave this job off your resume you'll most likely have to disclose it your employment history where there's still a possibility of leaving without notice affecting their hiring decision.

Lunah, MSN, RN

33 Articles; 13,731 Posts

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 15 years experience.

If you quit without notice, it will be a termination, not a resignation. If you are cool with being fired, quit without notice. Otherwise give notice and get out with more professionalism than you are seeing. 

amoLucia

7,735 Posts

Specializes in retired LTC.

Unless you have another position lined up & ready to go, I'd advise NOT to just leave. Regardless if your departure is a resignation or just a walk-away, you'll most likely be ineligible for any DOL unemployment benefits.

Also you'd be jeopardizing collecting any accrued benefits like your earned PTO. And then there's COBRA (not sure if you'd qualify for continuing your health insurance).  Anyway, you'd likely have to wait out that window period for your new insurance coverage to kick in, so BE CAREFUL!

And in the future, you may still have to deal with those people, like when IRS tax time rolls around or you want to convert an IRA program you might have.

As much as it 'grinds your gears', go out neutral. You may still need them in the future and you don't want to p*ss them off.

guest358111

12 Articles; 123 Posts

Never burn bridges. Give two weeks and you won’t regret it. Quit on the spot, and you might regret it. Healthcare can be a small, small world.

9kidsmomRN

69 Posts

Specializes in Cardiac. Has 32 years experience.
On 5/21/2021 at 6:57 PM, Kooky Korky said:

Just say that you are hereby giving notice of your intent to resign.  (You can say for personal reasons or something else nebulous, like to spend more time with my family or something similar.)   My last day of work will be _______.  I have enjoyed working at ___________ and have learned a great deal.  Thank you.

Sincerely, 

your name and title.

Some places might not even want much notice, might let you use up your sick time, saved holidays, PTO, etc.

I wouldn’t say that I enjoyed working there, as this affirms their behavior. If they require a reason for resigning give a “personal” reason that they can’t retaliate for (not mental health or something like that).  Also be careful about expecting pay out for sick/PTO. Many employers will hold these earned benefits if you don’t work your last shift. Call in sick to use up your sick time/PTO if you want, but be sure to show up on your last scheduled day!

amoLucia

7,735 Posts

Specializes in retired LTC.

If one starts conveniently 'calling out sick' during that 2 week window period, the employer can negatively view it also and play 'hard ball'.

Unless you can produce a Doctor note, you can still be penalized.