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Seasoned nurse, asked to shadow for new job??

Nurses   (10,966 Views 18 Comments)
by Marshall1 Marshall1 (Member)

19,506 Profile Views; 989 Posts

I have applied for a PRN position (hospital) - have the interview scheduled - was told I would interview with the Director - then, if she is interested, I would be asked back to "shadow" a nurse for a day, then come back a 3rd time to meet with other management then offered the position..ok..this sounds like college RUSH to me...I have over 20 years experience as an RN, have never been asked/required to shadow for a job unless I was hired/orienting and this is not a new area of nursing for me..so..can someone tell me if the shadowing is an entire shift? Is it paid or my own time? What's the point? I'm not being sarcastic..I really just don't understand this.....:confused:

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KalipsoRed has 3 years experience and specializes in Telemetry.

215 Posts; 5,591 Profile Views

I don't either, but with the way jobs are these days I don't know if I'd refuse because they might take it offensivly. Maybe they've just had a lot of turn over and want to know before you take the position if you REALLY want to deal with the crap they have on their floor.

I don't think it'd hurt your chances for the job if you ask about being payed to shadow or if the shadowing is only for 2-3 hours instead of a whole shift. I'd just explain that this is a new concept to you and that you need a little more information.

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I am also an experienced nurse (experienced APN), and was asked to shadow for at least a half day on my last job interview, but it was made clear to me that the point of this was for me to have an opportunity to see what a typical day "on the job" was like to help me decide whether I was really interested in the job, not so much the other way around (them evaluating me). To me, it just seems like a courtesy for the (potential) employer to offer that (and, no, I was not paid for the time, nor would I ever ask to be -- in my experience, it's considered part of the interview process). I figure that, the more information I can get about a job in the interview process, the better equipped I am to make a good decision about whether I really want the job or not. From the employer's perspective, if it reduces, even a little bit, the chance that someone will take a job and then decide a few weeks or a few months later that it's not for them after all, that's definitely a good thing.

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roser13 has 17 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

6,504 Posts; 50,780 Profile Views

I would definitely NOT request to be paid. As the previous poster said, shadowing is offered to you as a courtesy.

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imintrouble has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC Rehab Med/Surg.

2,398 Posts; 51,106 Profile Views

Ten minutes after starting a new job I knew I had made one of the biggest mistakes of my nursing career. I stayed six long months. After that I decided I would ask to shadow for any prospective nursing jobs, so as not to have that happen again.

As other posters have said, I think the shadowing is a courtesy to you. For you to decide if they're good enough for you:)

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

1 Follower; 4,168 Posts; 29,336 Profile Views

If getting a job is a bit like matchmaking, then you would want to preview where you will be spending so much time before you interview.

This is a sign of confidence in their unit that a manager would welcome you to observe.

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tyvin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Hospice / Psych / RNAC.

1,620 Posts; 17,737 Profile Views

No ... you don't get paid.

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canesdukegirl has 14 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Trauma Surgery, Nursing Management.

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I would bet the bank account that the unit has had their fair share of crappy employees and they want to make darned sure that the match is a good one for you and for them.

Nope, you won't get paid. As Elk wrote, it is part of the interview process. Don't consider it like "rushing"; but rather consider it as "dating". They want to check you out, you want to check them out and you both want to be satisfied prior to commitment.

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lady constance has 27 years experience and specializes in neuro med, telemetry, icu, pacu.

38 Posts; 1,631 Profile Views

yah wont get paid.

yah get a chance to see if you can stand it.

they get a chance to eval you....

some places do this even to current employees seeknig a job in a different department....

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brandy1017 is a ASN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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From listening to coworkers who were job hunting this seems to be a common practice now. I think it is a good thing so you will know what you are getting into if you are changing into a new field in nursing. Also sometimes they are interviewed by their future peers who then have a say in the final RN hired.

Even for an educator job in the hospital, they went thru several interviews before being hired. So I guess its not quite as easy to get a job these days! Alot of coworkers had a hard time getting a new job, maybe because they were at the top of the pay scale, but they were very persistent and went on many interviews and finally got new jobs they like. Of course, they stayed on good terms with our manager so they could always come back if things didn't work out. It used to be common for RN's to come back and say the other hospitals were worse. We've had alot of turnover lately where they've gone into other fields and have not come back.

Back in the day, I was hired on the spot after one interview with the dept manager. I would be nervous having to go thru so many interviews just to get a new job. On the other hand, I do think shadowing is a positive thing, so you can get an idea if the new job is something you'll really enjoy.

Shadowing would be a win-win for both you and the employer. Probably decreases turnover and leads to higher retention rates.

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