Rude nurses

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by rnbsn2md rnbsn2md (New) New

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rearviewmirror

rearviewmirror, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. 231 Posts

3 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

Can't imagine a real doctor wasting the time to come here to troll, no matter what their age. To have to bring age up just shows a deeply embedded insecurity, if in a different universe, this could even be true. SDN material.

it's only logical step to think it's strange to have a bachelor degree, then have a post-bachelor degree that takes minimum 4 yrs, not even accounting the yrs that OP was not in school for due to work. You mention my thought is d/t insecurity, but it's a rationale path of thought especially given the situation that this is online where anybody can say literally anything without proof, which by the way tells me judging by your post, that you're quite young, naive and immature.

caliotter3

38,333 Posts

4 minutes ago, rearviewmirror said:

it's only logical step to think it's strange to have a bachelor degree, then have a post-bachelor degree that takes minimum 4 yrs, not even accounting the yrs that OP was not in school for due to work. You mention my thought is d/t insecurity, but it's a rationale path of thought especially given the situation that this is online where anybody can say literally anything without proof, which by the way tells me judging by your post, that you're quite young, naive and immature.

What makes you think the comment was directed at you and not the OP? Youth, naivete, and immaturity?

dennis8

dennis8, ADN, BSN, CNA, RN

Has 5 years experience. 68 Posts

17 hours ago, rearviewmirror said:

Really? You went to nursing school, worked as RN AND got your MD at age 26? hmmmmmm

It may seem strange, but I find it very believable. I don't know where OP is from, but in many Asian countries, students start college early due to different academic systems. I was born in the US but studied abroad for high school and college and I got my first bachelors degree by age 18. Here in the states, I know of 2 people personally who got their bachelors degree in nursing by age 19 from American colleges. Some people accelerate early, skipping a grade or two if they meet criteria. Everyone's personal situation is different.

To OP, I am 28 years old but look younger than my age. I work as a case manager right now and some people give me bad stares. One of my previous coworkers in med surge whom I have now lost respect for told me "case management is a specialty that you go into once you're old or become disabled." Your situation might be a jealousy or insecurity issue on the part of those nurses.

Oldmahubbard

Oldmahubbard

1,487 Posts

I doubt nurses are being rude to the OP, if that truly is the case, because the OP is very young looking, or very successful.

That being said, years ago I personally overheard a physician using the front desk phone to call an ultra fancy car dealership about her new vehicle. In front of several close to minimum wage employees, including me.

We were all praying our car would make it through one more winter.

She had a private phone in her office, which she could have used for the transaction. It was just very insensitive for everyone in the office to hear about her new whatever it was.

Only food for thought.

I have found if you consistently give out calm respect, for the most part it comes back to you.

If you act entitled, you are likely to find other people rude.

rearviewmirror

rearviewmirror, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. 231 Posts

2 hours ago, caliotter3 said:

What makes you think the comment was directed at you and not the OP? Youth, naivete, and immaturity?

If you did, then I owe you an apology but if you put yourself in my perspective, it appears from your first post you were talking me down and saying I'm insecure, which I didn't understand since that was uncalled for. If you didn't direct that to me, then we have a miscommunication problem and I owe you an apology.

20 hours ago, rnbsn2md said:

I used to be a nurse before I went into medical school. I have a BSN. I recently graduated from this is my first week as a physician and I swear the nurses are just not nice. I don't remember being so mean to doctors. None of the nurses know that I used to be a nurse and I don't know if it really matters but what would you do in my situation?

Maybe because of my age? I don't know. I am 26 years old but some people say I look much younger.

Should I mention my background in nursing?

OP, it is likely the hospital or unit your are in and not personal to you given how little time you have been on the unit and that you have significant nursing/ hospital experience. There are some hospitals that are incredibly toxic and the culture is to be rude to newcomers due to frustrations in the work environment, "it was done to me", or just the personalities on the unit leave a lot of be desired. The last hospital I worked in was like this (and I could not believe a place like this existed until I saw it myself). If your hospital has a significant amount of derm on the inpatient side and engaging with staff still proves to be difficult over time, you may be able to connect with the WOCNs (if your hospital has them) on certain cases to help ensure the care plan is carried out if needed.

The good part is that you are out of there in 4 years and I imagine a significant portion of your rotations are outpatient in derm. Just remain professional, do not engage, and focus on learning and patient care on the in patient side. You have shown yourself to be respectful and professional in your posts here and I have no doubt you will be successful. Best of luck in your future endeavors and congratulations on starting this great new chapter!

Edited by egg122 NP

chacha82

chacha82, ADN, BSN

Has 3 years experience. 626 Posts

What do you consider not nice?

Genuinely asking.

I worked with someone who I found frosty at times, but at other times she was thoughtful towards me. So I decided to just enjoy those times and maybe the other times she was rushed or stressed.

As a former nurse you know, nurses are BUSY. Maybe they are working short. Maybe they are trying to orient a bunch of new nurses and they don't have time to have long conversations with you. Maybe it's the summertime and they are working bare bones because people are on vacation. Maybe the med students are parked at their computers and the nurses are frantically trying to chart.

Who has time to mention "I used to be a nurse?" I'm not being snarky, but unless it's seriously slow I wouldn't expect to have a conversation with a provider like that.

Lunah, MSN, RN

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 14 years experience. 33 Articles; 13,715 Posts

20 hours ago, rnbsn2md said:

I don't think it is just me. Other interns have mentioned it as well. Might just be the culture here.

Probably. I wouldn't let it bother you much, I doubt it's personal! Give them a little time to get to know you.

One of my friends is a nurse who is about to start his third year of med school, he was PRN in our trauma program before he started school, but then he had to resign during his 2nd year — too busy! My husband (not a nurse, but former Army medic) is starting 4th year now (declared EM) and he is glad he has not had to work during school. It's so much!

Leader25, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 39 years experience. 1,305 Posts

19 hours ago, rnbsn2md said:

yup and I will be a practicing dermatologist in 4 years.

Hate to tell you darling but having graduated as MD is nothing,you have to prove yourself as a Resident,then we will see what you are made of.I do not feel you can mention you were a nurse and then act like you forgot where you came from and pull rank on overworked ,tired nurses.Then they will really find you annoying,right now do not act like certain jobs are beneath you because you are Mr.MD.We love docs that are competent,not afraid to get down and dirty,that do not need alot of handholding,or a maiden to serve then.

We had a NP once that would announce "is everything ready for me?" and we watched as a nurse put her in her place.

I am there to work with you not to serve you or clean up after your mess.Lets see how you fare as a resident first ...,good luck.

CharleeFoxtrot, BSN, RN

Has 11 years experience. 840 Posts

On 7/3/2019 at 9:46 PM, TriciaJ said:

OK. Thanks for the clarification. So, any thoughts on why the nurses are mean to you?

(chuckles)

K+MgSO4, BSN

Specializes in Surgical, quality,management. Has 12 years experience. 1,753 Posts

Last year when I was on holidays I came back to a ward of nursing and allied health staff distraught by the loss of one of our favourite patients. His death had occurred on a Tuesday after the resident and registrar had rotated on the Monday. During the inital RR the resident had informed the ANUM covering my role that the ward staff were useless as they refused to keep the patient on the ward on 15LPM of oxygen while still for full resus i.e. as high as it would go on our ward meters. The ICU response nurse knocked her down and informed her that she was correct a ward pt would not be staying in on 15LPM on a general ward. The resident stated that the pt should be moved to the heam unit because they could manage oxygen !?!?!?!? The registrar had only moved from interstate and was a bit dippy and useless at that point. Thankfully my ANUM who was covering me is very sensible and called the consultant who agreed with ceasing active treatment as he was expiring before their eyes.

I came back the following Monday to a group of nurses who had such distrust in that resident and registrar that the poor intern was getting hammered as he had been on the service for 8 weeks prior to this. We organised some debriefing sessions for the staff and later that week after I had spoken to the registrar and resident we held a morning tea as a team and worked through breaking down some of the conflict.

I suppose what I am trying to say is what may of been an off the cuff remark in a tense situation can actually really impact the entire relationship between the nurses and a doctor. If you are brave enough go and talk with the unit manager and ask if there is something wrong with your interactions with the team or if it is something outside of your role e.g. a team member has been dx with a terminal illness can make a team cranky and abrupt with new people.

xanderx

xanderx

39 Posts

On 7/3/2019 at 9:30 PM, TriciaJ said:

If you entered a BSN program at age 18 you would have likely been 22 when you graduated. To have just graduated from medical school at 26 you can't possibly have spent much time nursing. So no, I wouldn't mention a nursing background since you don't actually have one.

As far as nurses being mean, to whom exactly are you referring and what are you describing as mean? You don't give a whole lot of information for us to be able to help you. Maybe your first intern rotation landed you in a particularly toxic unit. Maybe your attending is an ******* and has already set the tone. Is there any possible way you've rubbed people the wrong way without realizing it?

I used to work in a teaching hospital. Some residents and students were a delight to work with; some a nightmare. Hope your next rotation goes better.

Wow! It doesn’t matter how long the OP was a nurse. They were still a NURSE. Useless response.