Jump to content

RN tried to talk me out of Nursing school...

Posted

You are reading page 3 of RN tried to talk me out of Nursing school.... If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I don't want to be one of those discouraging about nursing, but again, I don't think you understand the whole picture. There are many new grads in your city who would be thrilled to find jobs in physician's offices and nursing homes because they can't find anything at all.

They've been saying the thing about how nurses are going to start retiring again for the last five years. I was one of the first around allnurses who struggled to find a job after graduation (and quite a lot of people didn't believe it). The situation has gotten minimally better, if that. The older nurses may have started retiring, but there are plenty of younger and/or newer nurses to take their places--and the hospitals are making do with fewer nurses even when they're still open.

It's great to work hard to get good grades; it's great to get an internship in school; that's almost all you can do. But sometimes it still doesn't work out.

You aren't graduating yet, but if I could give advice to anyone graduating into a tight local market, it would be--seriously--to take any hospital job that's offered. Don't lull yourself into thinking that because you were offered one job, the market isn't as tight as was rumored. I'd say it's okay to hold out for a hospital job for a little while (depending on your living situation), but not too long--then it's time for the alternatives.

Best of luck in nursing school. I don't regret it for a moment.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

I love how many people will be quick to point out how "bad" the nursing job market is, yet it's miles better than the job markets for the vast majority of other college grads. I guess I'm not seeing the terrible job market. My unit hired 4 new grads this week.

edmia, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency, ICU. Has 10 years experience.

So I went to my GP's private clinic today to get blood work, a PPD round, and antibody titers done for nursing school which I'll be starting this coming Fall. Upon meeting with his nurse, I told her I needed all of this done for nursing school. She blankly stared at me for a good three seconds and then asked: "Why in the world are you going to nursing school?". I wasn't sure what she meant by that, so I asked her to clarify. She said "Well, you're a young guy with flawless English skills. What the heck are you getting yourself in to?" (This Nurse is a Russian immigrant, whose English skills are not perfect. I'm Russian too, but came here at a very young age unlike her. I guess a lot of Nurses in New York City are immigrants that lack great language skills so they choose nursing as a "last resort" profession apparently?). She went on to explain to me how nobody is hiring right now, and that hospitals are closing. She assumed I was going for an Associates degree, but the program I'm entering is for the BSN. I told her this, and then she questioned why I didn't go for PA or PT instead. I told her Nursing is what I truly wanted to do, and she smirked and said "Okay, you don't understand the situation yet. You'll see."

:confused:

Not that I was discouraged by this, but I found it interesting how bitter some people can be against their own profession. Especially a nurse, who knows that there is a dire need for people to enter the profession, especially as many baby-boomer nurses are going to retire in the coming years.

Have you ever had people try to discourage you when you told them you were going into nursing? And do you regret not taking their advice?

I think I know what I'm getting myself into (hopefully), and I'm mentally prepared. I just hope that at some point in the future I won't end up hating my job like she does...

I understand where she's coming from. You're young, have no kids (assuming here) and she felt you should aim higher. No harm in that. I wouldn't suggest PA or PT as the pay is awful and the professional treatment just as bad as in nursing. I would tell you to take your BA in biology and head to med school but it really all depends on your personal goals.

What do you want out of your nursing career? Autonomy, respect, recognition? Then forget bedside nursing! You need to aim for an advanced practice degree to get close to that. You really care about people and want to help them as they maneuver the healthcare system? Stick to nursing.

I highly recommend nursing to people going for a second or third career for the security in the job market (yes, you may have to move to Arizona but jobs are there if you truly need them). Wouldn't encourage young people with time to go to school for something else unless they really love nursing.

Just my opinion.

Edmia,

My *ultimate* goal is to get masters and specialize. Perhaps even anaesthesist but we'll see where that goes. First, after obtaining a BSN, I want to work hospital bedsides for at least a few years. That's the plan anyway.

MD is a nice thought (I was extraordinarily fascinated with physiology and biochemical processes in the various systems of the body in a/p) but it's ridiculously competitive. Everyone and their mother is a pre-med apparently. My mistake was that I didn't have a goal in mind in high school, and slacked in my first year of college. After I got my stuff together, I got A's in both semesters of inorganic chemistry and both semesters of general biology. I probably could have gotten accepted to a New York-area med school if I was focused from the beginning though. But don't get me wrong, I didn't "settle" with nursing at all. Nursing was my initial goal entering college, and I would feel much more comfortable with the responsibilities of a nurse. I feel like specializing would be a great niche for me though, as it combines nursing and all the other stuff I'd be interested in learning.

CrunchRN, ADN, RN

Specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health. Has 25 years experience.

Do what you want. You will anyway. :lol2:

Nurse Leigh

Specializes in Telemetry.

It's not as though those of us that try to warn people about nursing are selfishly trying to keep all the great perks and pay to ourselves! :rotfl:

Amen!

workingharder

Has 2 years experience.

I love how many people will be quick to point out how "bad" the nursing job market is, yet it's miles better than the job markets for the vast majority of other college grads. I guess I'm not seeing the terrible job market. My unit hired 4 new grads this week.

I would hope that you truly don't "love" the expressions of frustration from people who are struggling to find employment in the current market. While it may be better than other career prospects, that degree of difference means nothing when trying to find work, keep creditors at bay, feed and shelter yourself and family. Add to these the sense of worthlessness and being an outsider trying to get into the club of employment raises stress to a level and tone that is similar to, though different from the stress of the job itself.

You say your unit hired four new grads. How many applied? Four? Forty? Four-hundred?

It is a terrible market for new grads. You are an experienced nurse somewhat insulated from the market right now, so no, you are not seeing how bad it is. But, you'll have to trust me on this one, it sucks.

Edited by workingharder
removed redundant word

Anytime I go to see a movie I watch it with an open mind even if I had people tell me how they didn't like it and it was horrible and not worth the time/money. I feel the same about nursing and much more so. I've always loved the healthcare field. I refuse to let others make decisions for me. As far as I'm concerned they can keep their unwanted advice to themselves. This is what I choose to do. If I end up not enjoying it, at least I have decided that for myself and didn't let someone talk me out of a career that I have worked hard for and have wanted for such a long time.

Long story short, only you can decide if nursing is for you.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

I would hope that you truly don't "love" the expressions of frustration from people who are struggling to find employment in the current market. While it may be better than other career prospects, that degree of difference means nothing when trying to find work, keep creditors at bay, feed and shelter yourself and family. Add to these the sense of worthlessness and being an outsider trying to get into the club of employment raises stress to a level and tone that is similar to, though different from the stress of the job itself.

You say your unit hired four new grads. How many applied? Four? Forty? Four-hundred?

It is a terrible market for new grads. You are an experienced nurse somewhat insulated from the market right now, so no, you are not seeing how bad it is. But, you'll have to trust me on this one, it sucks.

My point is simply that if you are going to go to college, than nursing is still a better bet than philosophy or English literature if you wish to be employable post graduation. I think nursing majors may be more frustrated because they worked so hard for their degrees, but this board makes it seem like it's a problem with nursing. It isn't. It's a problem with the economy across the board. I hate how when someone comes here and states that they want to become a nurse people immediately jump down their throat about how they won't be able to get a job in four years, so don't go to nursing school. That train of thought makes no sense to me. What major would be better? And who knows where she wants to work after school? Many hospitals in my area are hiring nurses everyday.

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

i'm going to cruise right on past the "dumb immigrant" comment. i'll get myself in trouble if i say what i think about that.

there is no nursing shortage. there is not likely to be one for quite some time. your professors are feeding you a line of cr@p if that is what they are telling you. i've been out of nursing school 27y, and they were saying the same thing back then. they have to in order to survive.

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

you mean everyone who wears scrubs and a scope around her/his neck isn't always a nurse?

​say it isn't so, joe!

Flare, ASN, BSN

Specializes in school nursing, ortho, trauma.

I will give simple advice to the OP:

Follow your bliss. If that means nursing school and a career as a nurse, then go for it and achieve it and do the best job you can. It doesn't matter what other people think - you are the one that has to live your life.

Sure, the job market for nurses isn't as spectacular as the articles on the front of the yahoo home page would lead you to believe, but times are tough for practically every profession. I work with quite a few unhappy teacher's aides that would give their eyeteeth for a full time teaching job. I would never talk anyone out of going to nursing school, though i am not opposed to showing someone the truths that are sometimes hidden.

My advice to you is to do what will be rewarding for you. If that means nursing school, then so be it. And then get out there and network, network, network. Get your face familiar with the local hospitals. Volunteer if you have to. When you finish nursing school, your full time job will be filling out job applications and following up on said applications. Remain positive and cheerful, even when you don't feel like being either. Achievement is 50% busting your butt working and 50% good attitude.

DizzyLizzyNurse

Specializes in Peds Medical Floor. Has 12 years experience.

She's right that NYC is a tough job market for nurses and a few hospitals there have closed in the past decade. You may have to look into working/moving to the surrounding areas after graduation. Long Island (given that it's isolated and the housing is expensive) is an easier job market. Upstate NY is also an easier job market.

Uh not really. I'm from Buffalo.

I don't want to be one of those discouraging about nursing, but again, I don't think you understand the whole picture. There are many new grads in your city who would be thrilled to find jobs in physician's offices and nursing homes because they can't find anything at all.

They've been saying the thing about how nurses are going to start retiring again for the last five years. I was one of the first around allnurses who struggled to find a job after graduation (and quite a lot of people didn't believe it). The situation has gotten minimally better, if that. The older nurses may have started retiring, but there are plenty of younger and/or newer nurses to take their places--and the hospitals are making do with fewer nurses even when they're still open.

It's great to work hard to get good grades; it's great to get an internship in school; that's almost all you can do. But sometimes it still doesn't work out.

You aren't graduating yet, but if I could give advice to anyone graduating into a tight local market, it would be--seriously--to take any hospital job that's offered. Don't lull yourself into thinking that because you were offered one job, the market isn't as tight as was rumored. I'd say it's okay to hold out for a hospital job for a little while (depending on your living situation), but not too long--then it's time for the alternatives.

Best of luck in nursing school. I don't regret it for a moment.

YES! I was an LPN for over 7 years, and an aide before that. My former place of employment loved me so much they sent me to school FOR FREE.

By the time I graduated from RN, the entire situation had changed. The market was so tight that my place of employment offered me an RN position (all their RN positions are supervision) PRN (that's the best they could do - they didn't even have a position for me at their 13 LTC facilities or corporate!!!! I was willing to do any facility or shift. So they also tried to take advantage of my situation telling me they wanted me to keep my LPN position (the only nurse on a floor of 43 residents with 2 CNAs AND take the supervision position for the whole building...basically so they could save $ by having me do 2 nurses' positions. They wanted to pay me an extra $1.50 an hour for all that work and responsibility. I really shouldn't have been offered the supervision job in the first place on nights seeing as how I would be the ONLY RN in the building and since I was working the LPN job that would leave me and another LPN as the ONLY nurses in the entire building. Yeah, that's safe.

So I applied for anything and everything outside of the corporation I worked for because I was too afraid to take all that on. There are 2 major corporations that run the majority of the hospitals in Buffalo. There are 3 other hospitals not affiliated with them. 2 of those wouldn't even return my calls. The 1 offered me an LPN position (basically the same thing I was doing before) for an over $5 an hour pay cut. 1 of the major corporations (out of 4 hospitals and various nursing homes and clinics, only had 1 job open to new grads. I had 76 new grads in my class alone. There are 5 other nursing schools in the area that I can think of. The University of Buffalo is the biggest school in NY state and is close by. They would have hundreds of new grads at their school alone. So 1 job that hundreds of new grads were fighting for. The other major corporation was closing a major hospital and nursing home so they really weren't hiring. I got lucky that the recruiter had interviewed me years earlier and recognized my name. She hired me into a LTC/rehab position. So it took me another 9 months after graduation to get.....another LTC job. I was desperate so I took it. The union had just voted a pay decrease for new hire nurses in LTC so that was great.

Then I got to be worried because they were laying people off and buying people out and cutting full time jobs to part time because of the merges and closing. The company is union and with no seniority I was worried. I was right to be. I got bumped from my job before orientation was over. This also happened to some nurses hired for ICU I met. So you could get hired and think you have a job, only to get it snatched away.

So then I was bumped to a floor were as a new grad RN I was on a vent unit. I had never touched a vent or trach. I had no idea what I was doing. Thank god for the RT's!!!!! I learned so much from them as I was basically not trained and then I was left ALONE and was frequently the only nurse. I had no one to ask questions nearby. I'd have to call other floors for help. It was AWESOME. :eek: So I just learned to wing it and figure that if no one was yelling at me I must be doing ok.

I just got transferred to a med surg floor and I'm finally happy. I've had to unlearn and relearn things that I did by winging it on the vent floor.

Only took a year and a half for me to make it into a hospital. And it was mostly luck. I had references for most of the area hospitals and they didn't help. I applied out of state and across the state when I started getting desperate. I had 10 years of healthcare experience and I wasn't picky about what shift I worked or what floor. I called, tried to meet recruiters in person. Didn't work.

I actually love nursing, in and of itself. I hate what the economy and big business have done to it. So for me, it's a love/hate thing. I'm just glad that I haven't gone home crying from the hospital. I used to cry most nights leaving the vent unit and get nauseous on my days off when I'd think about having to go back to work. The union had so many complaints about the new facilities and mergers they didn't do much for vent unit (had the least amount of employees).

I like to tell the good and the bad. People have a very idealized idea of what nursing and health care are like. I love working 3 days a week, the pay is better in the hospital, I like the patients (usually haha), like learning new things, and I like my coworkers. Just know what you are getting yourself into.

Sorry this is so long, but it irks me when people think nursing is recession proof. People wouldn't believe me when I said it was tough. My dad thought I *must* be doing something wrong when I couldn't get a job.

[quote=>JustBreathe

Long story short, only you can decide if nursing is for you.

Love this! Thank you. I am going into nursing school in the fall after years of working hard to get here. I am very excited about nursing and the healthcare field. I have worked as a cna as well, I'm not going in blindly.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Please research.. and compare .. How difficult it is to obtain a BSN.. and how very difficult it may be to apply that hard earned degree in a hospital setting ..towards your goal.

You sound very bright and motivated.

I am also very bright and motivated. A BSN means very little in today's job market.

Please consider a different major. Have you thoroughly researched the "responsibilities of a nurse"?

I wish I had.

I have several patients that tell me they are going to nursing school (and they always say it with some expectation that I'll be impressed by that, lol). I don't ever discourage them, I just say "good luck." AFAIK, none of my kids is interested in a medical career. If they or anyone I cared about were, I'd use my dying breath to discourage it. I suspect the OPs friend feels a kinship to him due to their shared backgrounds and it trying to help him avoid a mistake. It's not as though those of us that try to warn people about nursing are selfishly trying to keep all the great perks and pay to ourselves! :rotfl:

I'd rather hear a simple "good luck" and it being said genuinely. Than, someone smirking in my face and then laughing, yeah it has happened. Also, it depends on who I am talking to and what kind of a day I am having at that moment, when I tell someone about school. Intuition is a great thing when you're trying to decide if you want to disclose that type of information or not. I like to rely on my gut feeling. I do know, whatever they might say won't change my decision is the slightest. :)

BlueDevil,DNP, DNP, RN

Specializes in FNP, ONP. Has 25 years experience.

I liked the suggestion to "follow your bliss," and I think that's a great philosophy. I already discussed my view of the OPs situation; as far as the threads on this board regarding the same topic, if someone asks they need to be prepared to hear a response other than the one for which they may have hoped.

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 33 years experience.

Hiker1 I vehemently disagree with your post! Nursing is probably the one field where top-notch English proficiency is essential! You could kill somebody if you mess that up! (I'm being semi-facetious there). It isn't the last refuge of the people who refuse to become English-proficient, hopefully.

I can be as cynical as the next person, but the way she said that was rude. The way I see it is -- we will always need nurses, all of us will die off at some point, and who's to say you can't be part of the positive change? I don't think we should tell people not to become nurses. I think we have an obligation to shoot down pie-in-the-sky notions and the ever-present bucketloads of propaganda we get from self-interested parties, but once that's done I say go for it if you want to.

My daughter just got her bachelors - she's a certified athletic trainer (not a personal trainer) and now has informed me she wants to go to med school and specialize in Sports Medicine. I'm happy for her. If she wanted to be a nurse I'd be happy for her, too -- as long as she didn't have blinders on.

It is clear now, ("At this point it does NOT matter to me") that you only wanted positive reinforcement. Not sure why any of us should waste additional time sharing our thoughts.

I think he meant that the discouraging words didn't matter, and asked if anyone had tried to discourage us from going into nursing.