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Rant*I hope I'm never their patient

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Today was the last day of the trimester, we finished with the pharmacology final. On Tuesday was our med-surg final. I've heard from several classmates that they just need ____ points to pass. Some are doing the bare minimum and just aiming for that 70 required to pass. A few people even finished the 100 question pharm final in 30 minutes...which is almost impossible because with the amount of SATA questions it seems unlikely that the students were even trying.

It makes me wonder about the nurses who have taken care of my family members and whether or not the nurse even knew what she was doing. Or if she just got lucky passing the NCLEX. I work hard for my good grades and it worries/angers me to see people that barely try and still get to continue to the next semester when it's obvious they're not that interested in actually learning anything. With many even using test banks from the textbook :(

Very scary.

I don't think you can pass the NCLEX with luck.

I'm at the end of my first semester. I'm not trying nearly as hard as I could be, but that doesn't mean I'm going to make a bad nurse. It means I'm tired. If you never want to be my patient because I'm not going for 100% after busting my butt all semester, so be it, I guess.

The nursing students getting by without "even trying" or not giving it their all make me a lot less nervous for their future patients than the nursing students that are giving it 100+% and are barely squeaking by and struggle with the material, but that's just me.

Chazzie_Made_It, ADN

Specializes in Telemetry, Med-Surg, Peds.

Some students don't have to try. There were some semesters where I could bomb the final and still pass. I didn't, but I could, because I kept my grade up the entire semester. But I didn't study like a madwoman, I studied smart. Go over what I knew I needed to go over and refresh what I was already comfortable with. I had friends who would study day and night, hours upon hours, and would say, "Cs get degrees." Not my motto, but for them it works. Some people have to work harder than others.

Happy Studying!

Arya526

Has 1 years experience.

I have A students in my semester class that go to clinical and STILL don't know how to properly do basic care. Same students have no real-life critical thinking skills and just give textbook answers.

Edited by Arya526
thought I was replying to another comment? (sorry Im new)

AceOfHearts<3

Specializes in Critical care.

I passed my pharm HESI with a 99.99% and in just under 30 minutes. I can't remember how many questions it had, but it was a lot. I wasn't even trying to finish as quick as I did. I finished long before everyone else, but it was because I was confident with the material and not because I wasn't trying.

kaylee.

Specializes in Stepdown . Telemetry. Has 7 years experience.

They may be excellent test takers but in this day in age with the "test bank" thing and the high prevalence of cheating in our culture today, there is definitely a likelyhood they are cheating. Its funny how programs just turn a blind eye to red flags while also creating these almost impossible standards in their curriculum. Nursing education has some issues at play. I dont entirely blame the students, because the system also a problem.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi. Has 10 years experience.

30 minutes is about how long it took me to take most of my tests in college. I consistently was among the first to finish and I finished my NCLEX in less than 45 minutes. Someone taking tests faster than you has nothing to do with their competency or their ability as a nurse in the future. When I take tests and see the correct answer, I select it. I don't spend 5 minutes reviewing every possible answer. I remember in high school, taking an SAT prep course and there being some ridiculously easy math question like a picture of a circle cut into quarters with 3 shaded in and it asked what percentage that was. The instructor went through every answer and was like "well you can eliminate 45% because you can see that more than half of the circle is shaded in and half is 50%" and went through each of the 3 wrong answers like this and I was sitting there like "or you could know in your head that 3/4 is 75%, pick that and move on to the next question."

Depending on what you plan to do, the specific medications you're learning about in pharmacology may not even be relevant to your career. For example, we spent a fair amount of time on cholesterol meds in my pharmacology class. I remember next to none of it because, in 11 years as a pediatric nurse, I don't think I've ever come across a child on a cholesterol lowering medication. Rarely have I come across anyone on any of the anti-diabetic meds meant for type II diabetics either because type II is quite rare in pediatrics.

Plus, what are you going to do in the future if you are taken to the ER by stretcher impaled with a foreign object and see one of these people as your trauma nurse? Say "no, not you, you took your pharmacology test too fast in nursing school"?

What a bunch of judgmental slop. You're not "worried", for Pete's sake.

There's always a holier-than-thou student that like to pass off their announcement that they are superior to others by proclaiming to be "worried" for the *gasp!!!* safety of the patients.

Why do you really care what other people do, OP? What's really bothering you besides... patient safety? :sarcastic:

Today was the last day of the trimester, we finished with the pharmacology final. On Tuesday was our med-surg final. I've heard from several classmates that they just need ____ points to pass. Some are doing the bare minimum and just aiming for that 70 required to pass. A few people even finished the 100 question pharm final in 30 minutes...which is almost impossible because with the amount of SATA questions it seems unlikely that the students were even trying.

It makes me wonder about the nurses who have taken care of my family members and whether or not the nurse even knew what she was doing. Or if she just got lucky passing the NCLEX. I work hard for my good grades and it worries/angers me to see people that barely try and still get to continue to the next semester when it's obvious they're not that interested in actually learning anything. With many even using test banks from the textbook :(

Very scary.

Edited by Hygiene Queen
punctuation

Lipoma, BSN, RN

Specializes in CEN | ER | Urgent Care. Has 2 years experience.

You should spend a lot less time worrying about others and more about you. You judging your classmates is subjective. If they are passing (an objective assessment) then you shouldn't be worried. The school is obviously not worried haha.

Orion81RN

Has 7 years experience.

The nursing students getting by without "even trying" or not giving it their all make me a lot less nervous for their future patients than the nursing students that are giving it 100+% and are barely squeaking by and struggle with the material, but that's just me.

Exactly. Sorry, things just came to me easily. Plus, I knew how to study smart not hard.

MiladyMalarkey, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Neuro. Has 1 years experience.

It's kinda presumptuous to say you think you know what other students study ethic is. Some people are really flippin smart & yeah could breeze through an exam in 30 minutes. I'm not saying there aren't bad students or even nurses out there but unless they are giving YOU care what do you know about them? Everyone is not like you & everyone doesn't study like you. I know students in my class who are A students & students who are just passing, both are equal in my eyes. They are passing & will have to sit & pass the same NCLEX if they want to be nurses. You have to allow that everyone is not like you or has your habits.

bitter_betsy, BSN

Specializes in Emergency / Disaster. Has 1 years experience.

Even if someone has a test bank they still had to memorize those questions and answers - they were still learning. Taking short cuts - yes. Is it right? I don't know. There are multiple tests and as long as they didn't have the exact test beforehand (which is cheating and a different story) then they were studying. Our instructor is letting us come in before and after class to study our previous tests because the material will be on the final. We are not allowed to take pictures of the tests or take them with us - but we can have as much time with the tests as we can afford to spend in the building with them. I still have to know the material to get a good grade.

We have one guy in our class who can take a test in 15 minutes - no matter what its on and do well every time. I read every question from back to front, and then I start taking the test from the middle to the front. 1) This usually keeps me on a different page from everyone else so I can't be accused of cheating. 2) I once took a test where the instructor said "read the test first". One of the last questions said "write your name on the bottom right of the last page and turn in this test without answering a single question". Everyone in the class failed. Now I read every test - because he taught us that its important. I'm a slow test taker, some are fast. I don't really care about what anyone else is doing. What matters is what I am doing. I had a non-english speaking student ask me how I prepared for my tests one day and I told him. I don't know if it will help him, but it works for me. He has a language barrier, I don't. We all have our issues. We need to give our classmates a hand-up whenever we can - you never know when you will be the one needing a little help. I surely don't want enemies in any of my classes!

Here.I.Stand, BSN, RN

Specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro. Has 16 years experience.

A few people even finished the 100 question pharm final in 30 minutes...which is almost impossible because with the amount of SATA questions it seems unlikely that the students were even trying. [/Quote]

Unless they know the material well and therefore don't feel the need to agonize over every question.

Yeah I just took my 100 question Foundations final in 30 minutes - got my A.

emmjayy, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, CCRN. Has 2 years experience.

Just because someone takes a test quickly doesn't mean they aren't trying. I did my 180 question ATI comprehensive predictor and got an 85% on it (which resulted in me being given a 99% chance of passing the NCLEX).... and I was only sitting there for 40 minutes. I learn by listening in lecture and by doing hands-on things, so this leads to me getting good grades without putting in hours and hours of studying. When I pass the NCLEX it's not going to be because of luck, it's because I'm smart, have excellent critical thinking skills, and have an excellent memory. But go ahead and keep thinking that people like me don't care and just luck into becoming nurses :)

kaylee.

Specializes in Stepdown . Telemetry. Has 7 years experience.

I once took a test where the instructor said "read the test first". One of the last questions said "write your name on the bottom right of the last page and turn in this test without answering a single question". Everyone in the class failed.

Why would they do this for a test! How is this benefiting anyone? I would not be surprised people are cheating if your program allows such practices.

Its very messed up, that people who worked hard to prepare fail a test because they didnt encode some cryptic instruction at the bottom that negated the entire test!

Btw the test bank thing is real; if the school uses the text book version of the test you can literally buy the exact test bank online and memorize each question. I know some people did this in my program.

WesClinicRN, MSN, NP

Specializes in FNP-BC, MedSurg, GeroPsych, ICU/Stepdown, clinic. Has 11 years experience.

In our nursing program, students actually had clinical grades and test grades. The test grades were to test knowledge, but the clinical grades were to test application of knowledge. There were many times that the teachers would use clinical grades, since they were subjective, to grade certain students lower if they knew they would not make a good nurse and needed to get them out of the program. A good nursing program usually has a way of getting out the bad apples.