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Presenting Hospital work I.D. as a Patient or Visitor. Any thoughts?

Nurses   (1,019 Views | 18 Replies)

erwindt has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

2,301 Profile Views; 45 Posts

I am not sure if this topic already exist, but I just would like to read other people's response regarding hospital employees presenting their hospital/work I.D. when they become a patient in any healthcare setting, visiting a family/friend, or as the healthcare proxy of the patient.  When I become a patient myself, I disclose my profession, only discuss when ask to.  My two opinions about this is that (1) you don't get proper service if staff knows you're a healthcare provider because they get intimidated, (2) it is often great for them to know, so that they are aware you understand their "language".  VERY vocal family members or friends of a patient can often be harmful for the sick individual and they don't receive proper care (in my opinion and my observation).  Health care staffs, especially nurses become highly aware, fear of something will happen, so they avoid pretty much engaging or even going into the patient's room.  I have witnessed this a couple of times in small and large, well renowned medical centers.  I think it is OK to reveal to healthcare providers that you are also a healthcare worker, if the interaction is not aggressive or very demanding.  Many people often forget about this and I feel sad for the "individual" in the bed.  I treat all my patients like my own family members.  That is the only and best way I can provide upmost care for them.  Before entering a patient's room, I often receive warning signs from staffs about the patient.  It is wonderful, but sometimes, patient's anger is NOT about the nurses, doctors, or other healthcare workers.  We forget they are sick and they are in unfamiliar environments.  I had a patient 10 years ago, with pancreatic stage IV cancer.  He was nasty to everyone, but I took care of him to the end.  We all know that this type of cancer is very aggressive and sometimes, doctors give patient and their family a hope to hold on.  They told the guy, he will have 6-months to live, but his prognosis was so rapid, that within 2nd week, he was at the end of his life.  He became so nice, apologetic about his behavior and thank me how nice I was to him.  He had no family at the bedside, so I held his hands, prayed for him, when he took his last breath.  This is the main reason why I love nursing.  

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11 Followers; 3,913 Posts; 31,074 Profile Views

I don’t mention it until I get outed and I always get outed. 😂 Usually it’s by my language or by a family member. When it happens I play it down as much as possible. 

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erwindt has 13 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

45 Posts; 2,301 Profile Views

Hi Wuzzie.  Same for me as well.  One time, I went for a procedure.  The anesthesiologist was having a hard time with my veins.  I told him, "Doc, go to my right A/C".  His eyes became big and ask me, "are you a nurse?"  I just told him yes, and that was it.  Did not want to entertain it.  Plus, he was going to "knock me out", so I got to be nice.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

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If you are a patient, or a family member of a patient... and disclose you are a nurse..you are shooting yourself in the foot.  All caregivers are intimidated.. and you are screwed. 

Been there, did that.

 

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

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Been there - NOT always true!

OP - your #2 'language' comment is soooo spot on.

During my hospitalization 5/4 to 5/11, my providers listened to me, really REALLY listened to me when I had real concerns. It was like me, the nurse, talking with my providers as I would if my concerns were from the nurse perspective. They listened and addressed my specific issues.

I doubt they would have been quite so tuned in if it had NOT been for C19, but I thank TPTB for my hospital intensivist.

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JBudd has 39 years experience as a MSN and specializes in Trauma, Teaching.

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Well, for many years my hospital was the only one in town, and is self insured, so there was no anonymity for me or my husband.  Many of my nurses were also former students of mine (I taught them health assessment), talk about intimidation, LOL.  

One time in triage when I went in for CP, the nurse and the tech were arguing (quietly but I still heard them), "no, YOU start her IV", "no, YOU do it".  My poor tech's hands were shaking so much, that I started teasing her until she got annoyed and told me to shut up; & whacked it in first stick, LOL.  Then a former student got to be my nurse in the back.  

I don't pay much attention to people trying to impress me, with a badge or with status; they all (well mostly), have to get naked.

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1 Follower; 4 Articles; 598 Posts; 22,225 Profile Views

I was in the hospital and my doctor outed me as a nurse.  My nurse comes in to meet me and says oh so your the nurse, I reply "no I am a the patient and talk to me as if I was just another patient". I was real sick and just wanted treatment.

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Rose_Queen has 15 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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Nope. My experience isn't relevant to the areas I receive care. I don't want them assuming I know things when I don't. Does it come up in conversation occasionally? Yes, because a lot of the time my insurance card tells them where I work. But they bring up the subject, not me, and I'm clear about knowing what I don't know.

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Hoosier_RN has 27 years experience as a MSN and specializes in dialysis.

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21 hours ago, Wuzzie said:

I don’t mention it until I get outed and I always get outed. 😂 Usually it’s by my language or by a family member. When it happens I play it down as much as possible. 

My medical language is a dead giveaway, plus, my hubby always tells 

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1,907 Posts; 19,042 Profile Views

On a routine visit with my healthy wife- no.

When advocating for my elderly aunt-

CT ordered with contrast on a 95 year old: "So, renal function looks good?"  It did not, was overlooked, order changed to non-contrast.

"What's your policy on foleys?- my aunt is mobile up to chair."  The foley had been in a couple days longer than their policy, came out a couple hours after my conversation, UTI happened anyway.  Had I been there 2 days earlier, there would not have been a UTI.

Walked in, found NGT on high continuous suction.  First thing I noticed just from the sound when I walked in.  When the medical team rounded, I told them.  They checked and said said that it was correctly set on low intermittent.  I told them that I had reset it, was not sure whether it should be low intermittent or low continuous, but that they should be sure to communicate that to nursing.

This was in an urban hospital, Bronx.  Nurses are overworked and understaffed and were missing things.  While they may have felt I was stepping on their toes, I do believe they stepped up things when they knew that an educated advocate was involved.

I was polite and appreciative in all my interactions, but kidney failure, utis, and whatever happens when suction is too high are all things that are worth intervening for.  

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Kitiger has 40 years experience as a RN and specializes in Private Duty Pediatrics.

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On 5/24/2020 at 7:31 AM, Kyrshamarks said:

I was in the hospital and my doctor outed me as a nurse.  My nurse comes in to meet me and says oh so you're the nurse, I reply "no I am a patient and talk to me as if I was just another patient". I was real sick and just wanted treatment.

This. Yeah, I forget to keep my language "non-medical", so they figure it out. But there is so much that I do not know! I want them to offer me the same teaching they would give to a regular patient. If it's information that I already know, we can discuss it more in-depth. 

As a private duty home care nurse, I work with clients who have trachs & vents. That's a fairly narrow focus.

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MichelleMacRN2017 has 1 years experience and specializes in Long term care.

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I will out myself as a nurse. I can't help myself. I am also a really good patient. I try to be polite and grateful for the services provided to me. I always thank my nurses and doctors and LNAs... that is until I go under anesthesia. But knowing this, I warn all healthcare providers that I become a nightmare when I am going under and coming out and to prepare yourself. I think healthcare worker to healthcare worker, those type of conversations are important. But luckily, all procedures I have had the warrant anesthesia were quick. I have never had cancer or anything that has threatened my life. I imagine it must be so scary, as a healthcare worker who has seen how cancer can destroy the body and the mind, to know it's coming. Or to see your parent or child go through something like cancer. 

I have no answers here. I guess I am just babbling my thoughts. 

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