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Paging Doctor Nurse

Posted
by sauce sauce Member

I, myself have no intent on ever getting a DNP. All personal reasons aside, the rational behind my decision is due to the lack of benefit of spending a large sum of money on this degree. This does not include the large amount of time invested and other opportunity cost involved.

I am asking people who do think this degree is worth it to explain the rational for pursuing this degree, with explanation to why they want to acquire it, if it will be monetarily worth it for them, etc.

There have been many topics on this in the past, but it seems to not clearly depict the rational of going for a doctoral degree in an objective manner.

my guess of possible reasons would be one of the following

Teaching

So they can have a terminal degree

Leadership at a large hospital

Further one's education

Research (even though PhD is more research-y.

Maybe this will give people a second light before they decide to throw an extra 20-100k at a questionable (in my opinion) degree, and possibly save some people some financial troubles in the future.

Have fun folks and lets discuss this like a horse thats been ran over 15 times and homogenized so thoroughly you could separate the oxygenated RBC from the deoxygenated RBC in a centrifuge going at 1000rpm.

Boom

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 44 years experience.

Well, first of all it's 'rationale'. And homogenized means 'not able to be separated'.

I am pursuing a DNP as a non-advanced practice nurse because it suits my educational needs. I am paying cash out of pocket, and the cost is quite reasonable- well under the numbers you cite.

If you don't want to get the degree, why are you stirring the pot? I don't really understand the point of your post.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

I had a number of reasons for it:

1. To advance my fund of knowledge.

2. To advance my practice.

3. For the terminal degree aspect as it relates to my involvement in academia.

The biggest reason for me is that is cost very little for me because I was actively involved in teaching and precepting; I figured I should get it over with when it was nearly free versus later in my career when I might have to pay more for it.

WKShadowNP, DNP, APRN

Specializes in Hospital medicine; NP precepting; staff education. Has 20 years experience.

I will pursue this because I want a terminal degree, I'd love to increase my knowledge base, and I may want to teach in the future, we'll see.

I have no problem or concern with paying student loans.

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 27 years experience.

I would consider it if it's offered at the institution I'm affiliated with. The DNP is still not offered in the publicly funded institutions close to where I live with the exception of some of the privately-run nursing schools. As it stands, we have an option to pursue a PhD and can have 2/3 of the tuition reduced as an employee benefit. I've thought of it but don't see the appeal when a PhD would lead me to an academic/research career that will pay less than my clinical role. That is of course how I feel for now, I would likely have a different plan in the coming years.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

That is of course how I feel for now, I would likely have a different plan in the coming years.

Later in the career a academic job with a pension wouldn't be terrible, at least that's my plan :)

juan de la cruz, MSN, RN, NP

Specializes in APRN, Adult Critical Care, General Cardiology. Has 27 years experience.

Oh for sure. There are perks to an academic career (though my pension is already tied to an academic institution now). I'd love to teach full time one day and do something "less stressful"...just at the current time my financial obligations would not go well with a reduced salary.

sailornurse

Specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care. Has 39 years experience.

I am in the process of working on my application for DNP this month. I taught for ten years in a BSN program and getting the DNP would help if I decide to return to teaching as I am a FNP. I have never had any loans and do not plan on getting one for this degree either. Current cost is $15K. Having been and LPN, ADN/RN, BSN, MSN/FNP, every time I returned for more education, I became a better person & a better nurse. I may not actually use it as I am working in a variety of settings, but it may open more doors, more opportunities and that can not hurt.

I am very near the completion of my DNP. I have heard the common argument that the DNP is not a clinical doctorate and therefore is not worth pursuing. However, the knowledge gained in my program (ie. outcomes-based research, program evaluation, informatics, etc) has been immediately useful in my clinical practice. I have translated this information into a pilot study and the development of a new clinical program.

I had several reasons for pursuing the DNP. I expect that the number of DNP students will continue to proliferate and I wanted to remain on the forefront of this trend. I am young and have many years of clinical practice before me and feel it behooves me to have this degree early if it becomes a future standard. I also wanted a terminal nursing degree that will allow me to enter academia at some point.

WKShadowNP, DNP, APRN

Specializes in Hospital medicine; NP precepting; staff education. Has 20 years experience.

Oh, I wanted to add that in my current pediatric rotation for my MSN/FNP my physician preceptor is keen for me to do research/help him facilitate research on a specific topic that actually interests me. He knows I eventually want my DNP and he wants me to apply with his organization.

I swear, every day I'm with him he guides me further to the point of thinking he wants to give me a job. It's almost too good to be true, and then to be part of this study sounds pretty cool. It's multifaceted but he wants to identify risk factors for metabolic issues in later life, educate and manage the prevention now by going to the schools and following these kids after measuring both their presidential fitness and a "health report card" of his development (which he's asked for my input on), and then to see how this prevention impacts their well being as they age. Additionally, he wants to prove or have my research show the economical impact such prevention will engender. It's really motivating!

I want to take it a step forward as I am partial to the idea of motivational interviewing and its results on compliance and better outcomes. (Already have my problem statement for my premise written and I haven't even enrolled in DNP/graduated from my MSN.

I'm such a nerd/dork/professional student.

Oh, I wanted to add that in my current pediatric rotation for my MSN/FNP my physician preceptor is keen for me to do research/help him facilitate research on a specific topic that actually interests me. He knows I eventually want my DNP and he wants me to apply with his organization.

I swear, every day I'm with him he guides me further to the point of thinking he wants to give me a job. It's almost too good to be true, and then to be part of this study sounds pretty cool. It's multifaceted but he wants to identify risk factors for metabolic issues in later life, educate and manage the prevention now by going to the schools and following these kids after measuring both their presidential fitness and a "health report card" of his development (which he's asked for my input on), and then to see how this prevention impacts their well being as they age. Additionally, he wants to prove or have my research show the economical impact such prevention will engender. It's really motivating!

I want to take it a step forward as I am partial to the idea of motivational interviewing and its results on compliance and better outcomes. (Already have my problem statement for my premise written and I haven't even enrolled in DNP/graduated from my MSN.

I'm such a nerd/dork/professional student.

This is off topic but I love hearing about your fnp job prospects!!

FolksBtrippin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

Dear Sauce,

At first I didn't want my DNP either. Why learn stuff? I mean we're not Doctors after all....

:Emoticon-Devil:or are we.....

Then I found out that DNP stands for Da Nurse Practitioner, and I was like... yeah, that's what I'm talking about!

Then I looked at the curriculum.

And I'm like dude, what's research? And one of Da Nurse Practitoners was all like, "That's where we learn stuff so we have a rationale for prescribing meds." And I'm like "What's a rationale? Is that like, a rational?" and DNP is like "no it's Ra-Shuh-Nail" and then I left because I don't know anybody by that name.

But then I found out what they really do when they do research.

They take med students into the basement and homogenize their blood. And that turns them into milk.

So I'm totally going for the DNP.

oh you know I like to spice things up a little bit. It is my job.

WKShadowNP, DNP, APRN

Specializes in Hospital medicine; NP precepting; staff education. Has 20 years experience.

This is off topic but I love hearing about your fnp job prospects!!

Yesterday was my last day at his office but I didn't realize it until the end of the day. He told me to let him know when I submit my application so he can look for it and recommend me. Then he hugged me and his nurse hugged me twice.

But does one need a doctorate degree to conduct/ participate in research studies? Please educate me.

But does one need a doctorate degree to conduct/ participate in research studies? Please educate me.

You may not necessarily need a doctorate to conduct research. However, you really don't learn these skills in most graduate programs at the master's level. You also should be considering a PhD program if your intent is to learn and conduct research. The DNP has some courses on outcomes research and program development but research is not the true focus of the degree.

Edited by jaabrn

Palliative Care, DNP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I had 3 reasons for choosing the BSN to DNP program. First, I wanted a terminal degree in nursing. Second, I only wanted to go through graduate school once. At any point if the DNP becomes a requirement then I will have that complete. Third, I live in a saturated market and if the DNP can set me apart while job hunting then even better.

Nurse_Lightning

Specializes in Med-Surg, LTACH, FNP.

I want my DNP just so I can be called. "Dr. Lightning" :sneaky: