I don't like my unit, what should I do?

  1. Hello Everyone,

    At the end of August I started my first RN job on a dialysis unit. Dialysis was never a specialty I thought about or wanted to do, but I didn't mind learning about it. At first, I was fine but as I continue to work on the unit I'm starting to dislike it more and more. I have absolutely no interest in furthering my knowledge on dialysis anymore. I still feel like I'm extremely slow and having a hard time keeping up and finding interest in this specialty. My unit is already short staffed, so having more patients to manage during change over is a little difficult for me. Recently a co-worker has told me that our unit has a really high turn over rate, she's only been there for a year and is looking for another job. I work 12-hour shifts and as soon as I get there I'm ready to go home. I worked really hard to become a nurse and I want to enjoy what I do, but I don't feel that way right now. Whenever people ask me how I like the unit I work on I always say it's ok. I didn't want to give up so soon but it's been 2 months and I know this isn't something I want to continue to do. I don't want to waste my time or my preceptor's time, but I don't know what to do. Has anyone else not like his or her first job as a nurse? If so, what did you do?
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    About HKRN18

    Joined: Oct '18; Posts: 1; Likes: 2

    13 Comments

  3. by   missmollie
    There are a few things you need to do before giving up on this job. First, look at every day as a new opportunity to learn. "I have absolutely no interest in furthering my knowledge on dialysis anymore. I still feel like I'm extremely slow and having a hard time keeping up and finding interest in this specialty. " This attitude will hurt more than help, and you should always be willing to learn about the field you are currently working in.

    Take responsibility for your patients and be the best nurse they could have. Stay for a year, then look elsewhere in the organization.
  4. by   VegasRNMom
    Start looking for a new job but don't leave this one til you find a new one. You're only 2 months in and have already lost excitement. That's a red flag. Work takes up a large portion of your life. You don't necessarily have to love what you do but you need to like it a little. It's not acceptable to you to be unhappy and already start burning out after you've worked so hard for your degree.
  5. by   Triddin
    Quote from VegasRNMom
    You're only 2 months in and have already lost excitement. That's a red flag. Work takes up a large portion of your life. You don't necessarily have to love what you do but you need to like it a little. It's not acceptable to you to be unhappy and already start burning out after you've worked so hard for your degree.
    I disagree with this statement. I think what the OP is experiencing is common with almost all new grad nurses, the honeymoon phase has worn off and it's a reality check to realize what nursing is while you are learning how to be a nurse . It's tiring and exhausting learning to be a nurse. I honestly don't think anywhere would be much different. Give yourself 6 months and see how you're doing. Track your growths as a nurse and see how much you've improved.
  6. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from Triddin
    I disagree with this statement. I think what the OP is experiencing is common with almost all new grad nurses, the honeymoon phase has worn off and it's a reality check to realize what nursing is while you are learning how to be a nurse . It's tiring and exhausting learning to be a nurse. I honestly don't think anywhere would be much different. Give yourself 6 months and see how you're doing. Track your growths as a nurse and see how much you've improved.
    Bingo!

    It seems as though almost all new grads hate their jobs. Two months isn't long enough to have learned everything you need to know . . . and if you're not interested in learning, that's an attitude problem. Change your attitude and you may decide that you like your job after all.
  7. by   rearviewmirror
    I am an oddball in cases like this. I believe that one does not owe anything to an employer, just as the employer owes absolutely nothing to the employee, especially at-will states like where I live. Hence you see employers throwing staff under the bus like lukewarm pancake. You don't owe anything to them unless you signed a contract, and believe me they do not give 2 cents about you. An employment is mutual trade between two parties. You provide labor that they need to generate revenue and profit, and they provide you with benefit and compensation that you accept; it is nothing more than that, and nothing less.

    I will say at least staying a 6 month before giving up is a good practice, but if you don't find interest in it and you hate it, you are free to go. Don't let anyone hold you back. You don't owe them anything, and they don't owe you anything. Just don't do that too often, since that will look terrible in your resume if possible employer sees the pattern.
  8. by   CharleeFoxtrot
    Quote from Triddin
    I disagree with this statement. I think what the OP is experiencing is common with almost all new grad nurses, the honeymoon phase has worn off and it's a reality check to realize what nursing is while you are learning how to be a nurse . It's tiring and exhausting learning to be a nurse. I honestly don't think anywhere would be much different. Give yourself 6 months and see how you're doing. Track your growths as a nurse and see how much you've improved.
    Perfect, especially noting there is a honeymoon phase in this career. At two months in my first job as a new nurse I couldn't remember how to get to the parking lot from the unit much less where I parked my car.
  9. by   llg
    You don't like your unit? Maybe you should try to make it better.
  10. by   klone
    Quote from rearviewmirror
    Hence you see employers throwing staff under the bus like lukewarm pancake.
    I have NEVER seen anyone throw pancakes under buses, regardless of temperature. Do people do that where you live?
  11. by   NightNerd
    I would try to stick it out for the first great and then move on. From the sound of it, it's kind of blah, a little stressful, not really your thing, still lots to learn. That is basically every first nursing job. If there is nothing truly, outrageously wrong, it would probably serve you better to just get the experience and reference under your belt. It totally sucks, but seeing the growth you've made after a year is worth the challenge.
  12. by   Hoosier_RN
    dialysis takes way more than 2 months to learn. I've been working at it for 9 months, and have just gotten comfortable. Give it some time. I used to dread it some, but love it now. As a new nurse, any area of nursing is going to feel this way until you get your groove. I've worked in many arenas in 20 years, and can tell you from experience that it takes time. Good luck on your decision, but I hope you stick it out
  13. by   AnnieOaklyRN
    To the OP I am in the same boat... I do plan on trying to stick it out for a year so I can move into a unit I am interested in, and not burn bridges. I get it too, there is still plenty to learn, but if you are aren't passionate or in the least bit interested in the field that learning is not desired. It doesn't mean you are to lazy to learn, it just doesn't interest you.

    I am also however looking for other jobs in the meantime, which is what you should probably do. I suggest staying put, but applying to jobs you are actually interested in and hopefully you will find one, but if not you at least have a pay check!


    Best of luck!

    Annie
  14. by   Been there,done that
    If you are still on orientation, it is perfectly acceptable to request a new unit.

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