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NP still working as a bedside nurse on the side...

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by LM NY LM NY Member

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I don't get this, but we all have our own path.

The pay for an RN in my field is 1/3 of what I make, that could be most of the reason.

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WestCoastSunRN has 20 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CVICU, MICU, Burn ICU.

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On 6/24/2019 at 5:57 PM, Dodongo said:

Right??  When nurses say things like that it just shows they have zero idea what "critical thinking" actually is.  Haha.  Diagnosing and prescribing is about as critical as thinking can get.  And what skills are you afraid of losing?  Nursing skills?  Who cares?  I could take a high schooler and teach them how to put in an IV or foley.  Even during codes.  Pushing meds, doing compressions, etc - I'd much rather leave that stuff to the nurses.  I'll stand at the head of the bed or intubate or do a central line. 

I mostly respect your postings, but this ^ is beyond dismissive and condescending.  How many times have I witnessed a physician, with much more education and training than you, flub an intubation or central line insertion (shoving tubes as a previous poster put it)?  Fortunately it doesn't happen very often, but when it does I am there to help stabilize my patient, even though I am apparently not smart enough to do much more than what someone tells me to do with a wide-eyed, deer-in-the-headlights expression. 

Give me a break.  

I am an APRN student -- almost done with my program.  As far as critical thinking goes, I agree, diagnosing and prescribing requires high-level critical thinking.  And, although I have always sought to understand the pathophys, diagnostics, and rationale behind any treatment plan, I have a renewed respect for the responsibility of the providers to manage a patient's care.  So to the OP, I agree -- you will have plenty to occupy your mind with in becoming a good PCP or urgent care provider. If that is what you want to do.  Don't worry about losing skills unless you are not sure this is what you want to do.

 

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Dodongo has 7 years experience as a APRN, NP.

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2 hours ago, Oldmahubbard said:

I don't get this, but we all have our own path.

The pay for an RN in my field is 1/3 of what I make, that could be most of the reason.

Yeah, same here.

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Dodongo has 7 years experience as a APRN, NP.

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1 minute ago, WestCoastSunRN said:

I mostly respect your postings, but this ^ is beyond dismissive and condescending.  How many times have I witnessed a physician, with much more education and training than you, flub an intubation or central line insertion (shoving tubes as a previous poster put it)?  Fortunately it doesn't happen very often, but when it does I am there to help stabilize my patient, even though I am apparently not smart enough to do much more than what someone tells me to do with a wide-eyed, deer-in-the-headlights expression. 

Give me a break.  

I am an APRN student -- almost done with my program.  As far as critical thinking goes, I agree, diagnosing and prescribing requires high-level critical thinking.  And, although I have always sought to understand the pathophys, diagnostics, and rationale behind any treatment plan, I have a renewed respect for the responsibility of the providers to manage a patient's care.  So to the OP, I agree -- you will have plenty to occupy your mind with in becoming a good PCP or urgent care provider. If that is what you want to do.  Don't worry about losing skills unless you are not sure this is what you want to do.

 

Honestly, "skills" in general, at any level, are relatively unimportant.  That's not the heavy lifting in medicine/nursing.  Patient management is what matters.  Whether it's putting in an IV, or putting in a central line, anyone can be trained in a skill.  But assessment, integration, synthesis and treatment of patients, at the RN or NP level, are what distinguish the best in each profession.  So to those saying they are afraid to lose their RN skills - who cares?  Give me a nurse that can recognize subtleties in patient assessment, or make connections in lab work and patient tests, and make recommendations for care.  These are what a transferrable to being a NP, again, on an elevated level.  

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5 hours ago, Oldmahubbard said:

I don't get this, but we all have our own path.

The pay for an RN in my field is 1/3 of what I make, that could be most of the reason.

I also think that once your  used to making the decisions it would be really hard to go back to delegated tasks. ( I also think in hindsight the OP may be surprised to find that his perception of the critical thinking required in the traditional nursing role is diminished)

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On 8/7/2019 at 7:29 PM, JBMmom said:

I work in critical care and we have a couple NPs that work per diem in our unit as staff nurses. They say that they enjoy their primary care NP roles, but still miss the activity of the floor at times. And they say the extra money helps with vacations.

Thank you! That’s exactly what I mean. I am set on being a primary care provider, but there will be a part of me that misses that hustle and bustle. Which is why I wondered if there were any NP’s that still worked as bedside nurses on the side.

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382 Posts; 13,915 Profile Views

Thank you all for your responses. Like I mentioned before, I may feel differently once in the field.

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

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1 hour ago, LM NY said:

Thank you! That’s exactly what I mean. I am set on being a primary care provider, but there will be a part of me that misses that hustle and bustle. Which is why I wondered if there were any NP’s that still worked as bedside nurses on the side.

After 1-2 years as a primary care NP, you might want to move into Urgent Care.  A busy urgent care definitely provides that sense of hustle and bustle and variety.  It is also a great chance to learn some provider skills like suturing, foreign body removal from the eye, I&D, etc.  Find an Urgent Care that is affiliated with a hospital ER, especially one in a more poor or inner city area - tons of excitement.  My Urgent Care rotation in a busy inner city Urgent Care was my favorite rotation in school.  Urgent Care in more affluent areas tends to be more quiet and boring.

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PMHNP Man has 7 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Psychiatry.

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How do I unsubscribe from this thread? I don't want anymore emails about it.

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umbdude has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

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On 8/9/2019 at 8:46 PM, PMHNP Man said:

How do I unsubscribe from this thread? I don't want anymore emails about it.

Near the top third of the screen you'll see a green button called "Reply To This Topic." To the left of that green button you'll see a small heart-shaped button. Click on that and a drop-down box appears. Click the Red "Unfollow" button.

Edited by umbdude

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traumaRUs has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

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On 8/8/2019 at 6:51 PM, Dodongo said:

Honestly, "skills" in general, at any level, are relatively unimportant.  That's not the heavy lifting in medicine/nursing.  Patient management is what matters.  Whether it's putting in an IV, or putting in a central line, anyone can be trained in a skill.  But assessment, integration, synthesis and treatment of patients, at the RN or NP level, are what distinguish the best in each profession.  So to those saying they are afraid to lose their RN skills - who cares?  Give me a nurse that can recognize subtleties in patient assessment, or make connections in lab work and patient tests, and make recommendations for care.  These are what a transferrable to being a NP, again, on an elevated level.  

Can not like this enough. Its the assessment that is the most important aspect of critical care - the realization of what needs to be done. 

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On 8/9/2019 at 11:39 AM, FullGlass said:

 Find an Urgent Care that is affiliated with a hospital ER, especially one in a more poor or inner city area - tons of excitement. 

I had to *side eye* this comment. 

I'm sure those "inner city" folks wouldn't appreciate it if their concerns were looked at as something of excitement for those bored providers looking for a little Thrill from work 😑😒

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