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NP still working as a bedside nurse on the side...

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by LM NY LM NY (Member)

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Hey guys! Just wondering if any NP(non-acute setting) on this board still works in an acute setting as an RN and not an NP. Maybe a per diem or part time in order to keep their acute care skills ongoing. Thanks!

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4,009 Visitors; 141 Posts

2 hours ago, LM NY said:

Hey guys! Just wondering if any NP(non-acute setting) on this board still works in an acute setting as an RN and not an NP. Maybe a per diem or part time in order to keep their acute care skills ongoing. Thanks!

I don't  but i do teach nursing clinical on occasion for a local college so I still find myself in the hospital  in that function.

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206 Likes; 2 Followers; 5,533 Visitors; 937 Posts

Typical NP job 50 hours a week, when all is considered. And you are maintaining some other skills why?

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37 Likes; 13,515 Visitors; 368 Posts

Not an NP yet, but didn’t ever want to lose my critical thinking or assessment skills that are more centered around acute care. I’ve heard some say “once a nurse, always a nurse”. How true is that? I have friends who are not NP’s, but have left the bedside to LTC, clinics, case management, etc. and were honest enough to tell me that they don’t feel confident enough to jump into an emergency situation if the occasion ever arises. I don’t want that to be me. I was thinking more along the lines of once an FNP, I can do one shift a month. I know it’s just wishful thinking, but it is a thought.

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ArmaniX has 5 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Surgical Critical Care CRNP.

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Can’t ever lose those critical acute care skills! Just like we kept those flash cards from Nursing Fundamentals 1. 🙄

I’d invest your time and energy into your soon new career path. You won’t need to know how to run a CRRT machine or push adenosine as an FNP. There is no need to continue to maintain a set of skills that hold little value in your day to day. Let them go, enjoy all the new responsibilities and duties that are about to be sitting at your feet. 

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206 Likes; 2 Followers; 5,533 Visitors; 937 Posts

Nobody can possibly attain or maintain every nursing skill. There are simply too many different clinical settings.

I have been a Psych NP for 15 years, and couldn't start an IV to save my life or anybody else's. It doesn't bother me at all.

I am well qualified and very confident to deal with mental health emergencies.

An NP should be working to expand their advanced practice. There will be ample opportunity.

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traumaRUs has 25 years experience as a MSN, APRN and works as a Asst Community Manager @ allnurses.

503 Likes; 14 Followers; 127 Articles; 184,960 Visitors; 20,508 Posts

I've been on my rural volunteer fire dept for 20 years and love it. Just enough adrenaline rush to keep me fresh. In my day to day APN life I also run codes although usually only the first 10-15 minutes until EMS gets there....

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Neuro Guy NP has 7 years experience as a DNP, PhD, APRN and works as a Neurocritical Care NP.

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I agree with others. Just let it go. It won't be pertinent anymore. Don't buy into the mantra some preach that's it's necessary. If you want to do it because it's your passion, go right ahead. After all, you know what they say, "if you like it I love it." I'm just saying it's not going to add any value to your overall career path.

Not to mention that some people will look upon this suspiciously. For example, while I was waiting to  get my NP license for the first time ever in a new state, it was taking a very long time (6 months). It even was delaying the start of my fellowship program. So I did a travel nursing job in the interim to keep myself occupied. However there were several nurse managers who were suspicious because they had looked up my pending NP license online and we're suspicious about me possibly leaving during the middle of my assignment if it came through before I completed the assignment. Long story short there are some nurse managers who will be insecure about your NP education, thinking that you will not be committed to the RN job if you find a better opportunity as a nurse practitioner somewhere along the way.

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The-DON works as a Director.

1 Like; 24 Visitors; 3 Posts

I remember being taught that regardless of your position you are held to your highest level of degree. Meaning you may be working as an RN but if you are an NP and something goes wrong, you are held to the NP scope.. (even though your employer has limited that scope). So it is best to avoid situations like this. Teaching is definitely a better option. With that said, I haven't ever confirmed this but I personally wouldn't want to take the risk either way. 

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37 Likes; 13,515 Visitors; 368 Posts

I guess I am just waiting for that one moment of saving a life in the middle of nowhere. Like a MVA or a passed out person. I want to jump in with no hesitation. You know, that quick and sharp ability to intervene and do something life saving. I guess by skills, I meant like rapid response type skills. Once I’m an FNP, how will I satisfy my need for an adrenaline rush? I definitely don’t want to do ACNP. I still have a few years to go, but here I am already thinking about it.

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The-DON works as a Director.

1 Like; 24 Visitors; 3 Posts

You could work in the ER as an NP. I worked with many as a trauma nurse,

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37 Likes; 13,515 Visitors; 368 Posts

I thought I can't work in the ER with an FNP. I don't want to remain in acute care full time once I get my FNP, but would love the chance to do it once in a blue. Maybe I am thinking too much about it now, when I haven't even started the FNP program. All I know is, I will always have that itch for the hospital setting, just not full time.

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