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LVN before RN? Should I? Help!

Posted

Specializes in Family Practice & Emergency Department.

i am a pre-nursing student and i want to get into the field as fast as possible. i hear its faster if i do lvn before rn? i don't know. im not sure if there are jobs out there for lvns in california? what did you guys do? i'd like to hear from everyone and get some advice. thank you ahead of time!

RITA2007

Specializes in Cancer research/ Orthopedics/ Surgery. Has 5 years experience.

I graduated nursing (RN) school at 21. I did it by working through my pre-requisites and taking classes towards my AA at the same time. If you have a good GPA and have made A's and B's in your pre-reqs, you're more likelly to get in to RN school. I'd personally recommend getting your RN license. That way you can work in a hospital on an acute care floor. Also, start working as a nurse tech when you finish your first semester of RN school. It's great experience, believe me!

nursynurseRN

Specializes in TELEMETRY. Has 12 years experience.

I got my LVN while being on a wait list for the RN program. I waited 4 years... I got a job in Acute Care easily and so did most of my friends. I don't think it was hard to get an LVN job they start off between17-21 dollars an hour as a new grad. Being an LVN while going through RN school helped a LOT financially. Honestly I liked going this route because as a LVN you always have the RN as a backup. Makes you a much stronger RN. I felt that by being an LVN I had a much stronger foundation as a RN. The other thing is that in acute care, the LVN does everything the RN does except IV pushes and IV piggybacks. So you get a lot of experience. Just don't get stuck being an LVN make sure you finish. I got a lot of negative comments by becoming an LVN first, But i wouldn't go any other way if I had to do it over. MY charge nurses and a few other nurses that I work with were also LVN's first and They are very strong NURSES.. GOOD LUCK!

Edited by nursynurseRN
messed up

Sherriblu

Has 30 years experience.

I would say dont do it, the LPN market is very bad and lpns are being phased out..Go right for RN and be an aide until you get RN..

kimima01

Specializes in telemetry, ortho, med-surg.

If you want to just "get in" to nursing quickly then go the LVN route. However, I think that the RN route is your best bet. As a poster before me has mentioned, LPN/LVN's especially in hospitals are being phased out. I also believe that your options would be limited if you ever wanted to specialize because there is only so much an LVN is allowed to do.

LPN*PRN

Has 12 years experience.

I am an LPN and I think you should go for RN if you don't have to wait very long to get into an RN program. If you must wait, getting your LPN while you do would be benificial.

go for your rn. my sister took her lvn license first n got accepted to a nursing program which had her start from the first sem! now she's justworking to pay off her lvn tuition!

I say go straight for your RN. Better opportunities. But let me just say, (I am an RN) the best nurses I have ever worked with, were LPNs.

from my understanding if you do the LVN/LPN it takes a year off you clinicles and also makes it eaiser to get into RN clinicels...so my nursing advisor had told me. i am from CA and currently live in louisiana at an army base and taking my pre-reqs and am getting A's how ever wheni go back to sacramento CA next year then hubby gets deployed i want to do the LVN but can not find a school under 27k thats just crazy!

i have also heard it makes things easier when you do become a nurse you have been around the RNs and can see there job and have worked side by side

LPN_2005/RN_10

Specializes in Cardiac Care, Palliative Care. Has 5 years experience.

Phased out where? Hospitals yes. Nursing homes, subacute facilities, md offices, clinics, and assisted living facilities will certainly have a need for LPNs for awhile.

I would say dont do it, the LPN market is very bad and lpns are being phased out..Go right for RN and be an aide until you get RN..

Edited by LPN_2005/RN_10
More to add.

lwndrgn

Specializes in LTC. Has 3 years experience.

I am in the LVN program right now. If you want to be stressed out, worried about passing checkoffs by instructors who expect you to teach yourself, and who rush you to finish said check offs...then fail you for not getting them done perfectly. Or, if you want to stress yourself to death with a test every week on four or five and sometimes even seven chapters of pharmacology. Or better still, watching as classmate after classmate are getting kicked out and its not even the end of the first semester...then come and apply to the LVN program. I suggest you take the RN maybe it is less intense and you might be able to learn something from and instructor rather than clueless classmates.

Most often non-LVN's will say do a RN first and pre LVN's will say go that route. The reality is in timing. I was a LVN first then I got my RN. If you can afford not to work and do school full time then a RN is great but if you need a substantial income go for the LVN first. If you enter a bridge program (LVN to RN) program it cuts out being on a waiting list and praying for acceptance. You are virtually guaranteed a spot if your grades meet the requirements. Also remember if you have no college credits you must take prerequisite courses first. An ADN program may take 2-3 years to complete unless you go full time year round. Look at the school and see when classes are offered. Some classes you may only be able to take during certain semesters. BSN classes at my school were offered year round but ADN classes were only offered in the Spring & Fall. Your situation is unique to you so weigh your options...don't let our opinions sway but use them for insight. However you get it...just do it! P.S. ...as an agency LVN I made $24 hr..good money

I am an LPN (almost finished with my LPN to RN program now) and I would have to say if I had it to do over again I would not have gotten my LPN first. I knew what the wait lists for the RN/BSN programs in my area were like... and had already taken several classes pre-veterinary school before changing majors... so I chose to get my LPN first so I could get some experience in the field while working on my RN/BSN instead of spending time on a wait list. Overall I would have to say that it was a poor choice considering I knew when I started that I wouldn't be happy until I at least got my BSN. I did bypass the clinical wait lists... by doing the LPN then LPN to RN (and there will be no wait for my BSN clinical rotation) BUT it really drew out the length of time and will end up costing a solid amount more for ending with the same degree.

I would recommend working as a CNA while doing your RN... but if you want to do the LPN knowing you want your RN... it is possible to have it work out to your advantage in some ways if you plan ahead. I say that I would have gone straight through... but my LPN introduced me to my peds job that I :heartbeat more than I ever thought possible... so I can't say that my LPN was a waste of time since I will be staying on even after finishing my BSN.

Make sure that classes at the school where you do your LPN will transfer to the school where you will do your RN (the nursing ones won't you will get advanced standing for those... but where I got behind was because my psych, anatomy & physiology, etc did not transfer so I had to retake them for my RN... which was an expensive waste of time :hdvwl: ). The transferring between schools can be complicated.... so make sure you talk to everyone and get confirmation that the credits will transfer and what credits you will then need for your RN. If I had really taken my time and not rushed it just because I was tired of waiting and feeling behind then I think I would feel a lot more positive about the progression of my nursing education.

One thing that sucks... is having to sit for the NCLEX twice lol :vlin:

Good luck to you... if you live in the OH area I could be of more help

RITA2007

Specializes in Cancer research/ Orthopedics/ Surgery. Has 5 years experience.

Phased out where? Hospitals yes. Nursing homes, subacute facilities, md offices, clinics, and assisted living facilities will certainly have a need for LPNs for awhile.

This is correct. I work at Healthsouth rehab and work with A LOT of LPNs. I look to them for guidance a lot because they have a lot of experience. But we need RNs too to admit patients: ie, do their physical assessments and push IV meds (some patients have PICCs).

I'm currently facing this decision as well. So I did a bit of research.

LPN classes takes one year to complete, and costs about $4000.

RN classes at the community college take (I THINK its 18 months, but it might be 2 years.) and run about $6000 for the program.

So I looked into the LPN-RN transition option, and honestly...it was a joke. For your one year of classes you took for the LPN, and obtaining your state license, you'll be awarded a whopping 9 credits. And you'll pay a fee to have those accepted. Furthermore, you take ALL the same classes as the generic RN program. The only difference is instead of taking nursing process I + II, you take transition nursing I+II. And they still charge you 6000 for the program.

So it's considerably more expensive to go the LPN-RN route. Also, I remember reading somewhere that after the first year of the nursing program, you're qualified to perform LPN functions anyways.(This may vary by school/program) So either way, one year after you start you can begin working.

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I am in the LVN program right now. If you want to be stressed out, worried about passing checkoffs by instructors who expect you to teach yourself, and who rush you to finish said check offs...then fail you for not getting them done perfectly. Or, if you want to stress yourself to death with a test every week on four or five and sometimes even seven chapters of pharmacology. Or better still, watching as classmate after classmate are getting kicked out and its not even the end of the first semester...then come and apply to the LVN program. I suggest you take the RN maybe it is less intense and you might be able to learn something from and instructor rather than clueless classmates.

Welcome to nursing school. Don't kid yourself that the RN programs are any different.

OP,

I did my LPN first and was happy with my decision. It was nice working while continuing on in school. My bridge program was 2 1/2 semesters long and virtually painless. Good luck!

As I suggested before, I think everyone has their own experience and unique life situations. See what programs your state offers and the Board guidelines of practice. In Louisiana LPN classes don't transfer because they are not the same classes it's just the same subjects but a more simple version. I think the bridge program requires @ 37 hours of general studies classes. I know in La. you can not work as a LPN regardless of how long you have been in RN school. You must have a license and sit for Boards. You are only allowed to work as a CNA after you've been certified. If you have the time & don't need a steady income do the RN. RN Nursing requires alot of reading and ability to critical think. LPN's don't focus much on critical thinking. They are more consumed with bedside care and patient needs. This is why most RN's say they make good nurses. Their clinical skills are usually pretty good. Good luck in your choice.

As I suggested before, I think everyone has their own experience and unique life situations. See what programs your state offers and the Board guidelines of practice. In Louisiana LPN classes don't transfer because they are not the same classes it's just the same subjects but a more simple version. I think the bridge program requires @ 37 hours of general studies classes. I know in La. you can not work as a LPN regardless of how long you have been in RN school. You must have a license and sit for Boards. You are only allowed to work as a CNA after you've been certified. If you have the time & don't need a steady income do the RN. RN Nursing requires alot of reading and ability to critical think. LPN's don't focus much on critical thinking. They are more consumed with bedside care and patient needs. This is why most RN's say they make good nurses. Their clinical skills are usually pretty good. Good luck in your choice.

You're right. It was CNA you can work as. Not LPN. That was my mistake.

I don't have any experience in the field as of yet, so I still mix up the titles sometimes.