Jump to content

LPN as quick transition into nursing field...

Posted
bmarrero bmarrero (New) New

I have currently applied to the LPN program at La Guardia Community College. Due to financial responsibilities, I cannot take the time off to pursue a RN right now. Would pursuing an LPN be a good move to transition from one career into the nursingy field?

NJMEDguy48

Specializes in student.

Hey Bmarrero,

Shall u get any responses to this post Please pass them along...... May I ask you some questions regarding your possible career choice and La Guardia (I am thinking NY?).

Thanks

littlemammanurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in PP, Pediatrics, Home Health.

Yes it is a good idea!I did what you are doing.I am an RPN(I think the same as an LPN in the States?)and I decided that due to a lot of responsibilities at home, a newborn and just bought a new home, that I would only be able to attend college for 2 years rather than 4.It is a great stepping stone as to where you want to work and gives you great experience in the nursing field!Hope this helped!

I have currently applied to the LPN program at La Guardia Community College. Due to financial responsibilities, I cannot take the time off to pursue a RN right now. Would pursuing an LPN be a good move to transition from one career into the nursingy field?

What is the difference between using the time to get your LPN and using it to get your RN?

OgopogoLPN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTC/Geriatric.

That is what I did. Have been an LPN for just over 2 years and will be starting my ugrades to apply for the BSN program in January. I knew my ulitmate goal was to be an RN, but at the time, I sure couldn't afford, the time or money, to do 4 year, plus ugrades, so really 5 years.

(Here LPN is 12 months straight through and RN is 4 year BScN. There are no 2 or 3 year programs, so it's from one extreme to the next. Now that I'm an LPN, I can apply to the 2nd year of BScN, so it will still be a year of upgrades, plus 3 years of university)

himilayaneyes

Specializes in Critical Care/Coronary Care Unit,.

Doing a LPN program is one way to transition to the nursing field if you can't afford the RN program right now. I know the LPN programs are significantly cheaper than RN programs. Just realize that if you're in the states, LPNs are being phased out of acute care facilities. A lot of hospitals don't hire them anymore. However, there are still opportunities in home health and SNFs (few in hospitals). If you go to a SNF try to work on a sub-acute floor if you're ultimate goal is to be a RN in a hospital. Just don't get too comfortable as a LPN and not go for your RN.

littlemammanurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in PP, Pediatrics, Home Health.

The RPN to BSCN program here is 2 1/2-3 years depending on if you do the quick stream.I am doing part time so it will take me 3-4 years to complete.

nakinok

Has 4 years experience.

I decided to go that route because I am in a state that has insane waiting lists for programs and I have had friends waiting for 2-3 yrs to get in and your prereqs are not good after 5. I know someone who waitied and now has to take some things over, which is crazy huh.

I saw many programs that offered the bridge for LPNS without the long wait list. This will probably become saturated soon as well because alot of people are going this route. There are even some private colleges that offer the bridge a year after you do the LPN and have a quicker enroll for alumni. It isnt for everyone but if you need to work soon and the options are like they are where I am I would do it all over again.

I was getting a bit discouraged not doing anything remotely close to nursing doing my prereqs and looking at the wait after finishing them and the cuts made at the state college nursing programs. Since I started classes for my LVN and having a time frame of when I will be in clicicals I have my groove back, and am learning alot of fundamentals that will help me when I do bridge. Also there are a few scholarships that you can get that obligate you to work for a certain hospitals for like two years after graduation and that is a gauranteed position after school. You get assistance with funding and experience from this.

Just be careful of the program you pick and check them out on your nursing board and listen to what people say about it, and go sit in a class yourself.

Yes some places are fazing out hiring LVNS but not every place and I see many jobs for LPNs, and many of my friends who work at hopitals as RNs tell they are still hiring LVNs. Salons and cosmetic surgery places hire LVNs as well. As my teacher says you gotta sell your skill. Like the last poster said just dont get comfortable being and LVN and not go back for RN.

NJMEDguy48

Specializes in student.

Doing a LPN program is one way to transition to the nursing field if you can't afford the RN program right now. I know the LPN programs are significantly cheaper than RN programs. Just realize that if you're in the states, LPNs are being phased out of acute care facilities. A lot of hospitals don't hire them anymore. However, there are still opportunities in home health and SNFs (few in hospitals). If you go to a SNF try to work on a sub-acute floor if you're ultimate goal is to be a RN in a hospital. Just don't get too comfortable as a LPN and not go for your RN.

I am from the "States" NJ/NY region. Two reasons LPN to RN.

1. 3 year wait MAYBE to get into RN schools.

2. Economics... There maybe some incentives offered by facilities/agencies that hire you to move forward with degree.

Cat_RN, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Geriatric, Hospice. Has 12 years experience.

It is definitely a good way to segue into nursing. That's what I did! I will start my RN next year. I have been an LPN for a year total now. I love it! I think it's a great way to see if nursing is the field for you.. I'm surprised more people don't do it! (Although many, many do!)

NJMEDguy48

Specializes in student.

How are the job prospects for us in the "Northeast " as LPNs? Very few openings to say the least here in the once well under served NJ region...........Even in LTC. Cna's big , lpns booted from hospitals and unemployed Rn's taking on lpn roles

Many thanks for all the responses. This website is so helpful. It keeps me inspired to pursue my goal. I currently work as an Executive Assistant. Granted I make a decent living, but it is time for change. I actually met an LPN yesterday who also advised this was a good idea. Folks I will keep you posted. All the best, Barbara

I think it's a great idea-I am doing it too. This is a career change for me, so I don't feel like I can waste time on wait lists. I got into a LPN program, and am going part time-it will take me 2 years (1) that's the only spot they had for me and 2) with a family and a long commute, it works fine. I will then get into an LPN-RN program at a neighboring college within 6 months of graduating the LPN. I've already done the prereqs. No wait list, no drama over getting in or not-it's fairly straightforward, and I'll be a RN. I plan on doing a BSN online, afterwards...

It is true that in my area (CO) LPNs are pretty much working in LTC. But it's decent pay, great experience, and they don't seem to have trouble moving on from that.

NJMEDguy48

Specializes in student.

I think it's a great idea-I am doing it too. This is a career change for me, so I don't feel like I can waste time on wait lists. I got into a LPN program, and am going part time-it will take me 2 years (1) that's the only spot they had for me and 2) with a family and a long commute, it works fine. I will then get into an LPN-RN program at a neighboring college within 6 months of graduating the LPN. I've already done the prereqs. No wait list, no drama over getting in or not-it's fairly straightforward, and I'll be a RN. I plan on doing a BSN online, afterwards...

It is true that in my area (CO) LPNs are pretty much working in LTC. But it's decent pay, great experience, and they don't seem to have trouble moving on from that.

Sounds like this career pursuit is perfect for you and your family. I wish you nothing but continued success. May I ask you your class size and M/F ratio...

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

What is the difference between using the time to get your LPN and using it to get your RN?

Well for one thing I made $40,000 working as a LPN the year I was getting my RN which sure beats racking up the loans.

OP I am very happy with my choice to become a LPN first. It allowed me to kind of try out nursing without investing a ton of time or money. My LPN program provided an excellent education and prepared me to easily move forward. Good luck if you decide to try it!

.

Thanks again for all the responses. MAXCAT - Where is the part time LPN Program you attend? NY?

NJMEDguy48

Specializes in student.

Well for one thing I made $40,000 working as a LPN the year I was getting my RN which sure beats racking up the loans.

OP I am very happy with my choice to become a LPN first. It allowed me to kind of try out nursing without investing a ton of time or money. My LPN program provided an excellent education and prepared me to easily move forward. Good luck if you decide to try it!

.

JULES, A question If I May.....

R u aware of the LPN prospects here in NJ? I have of course "heard".... in the recent past 2-4 yrs ago "health care health care". Then I see in the papers everyday within the last year layoffs, closings etc. I am not entering the LPN field just for the money. I want to 'contribute' but are there real jobs out there for us. I have read articles that many RN's cannot find work so they are taking less preferred jobs to work (and pay off loans) and facilities are hiring more CNA's due to costs. I actually contacted some (4) LTC facilities in my area and the HR depts admitingly say they are slow to hire new right now just because positions are filled and they actually have waiting lists.

I am going to be careful in saying this butttt. App 5 yrs ago construction trades was the place to be and schools promoted those careers and the costs astronomical. We see were those jobs have went. 8 yrs ago computers 1/2 those schools gone... now fewer good paying jobs and lay offs. Now health care schools are all over Unbeleivable costs they are full but I have recently again started to here fewer and fewer jobs. Is it really possible we are creating to many personel for positions available.

I see the 8yr RN nurses with many certs have a much better job outlook but LPN CNAS and new Gen RN's seem to be going (do I dare say) way of the dinosaur possibly because of specialization, the new health care reform and politics there of, the economy. If specialization is a course what type of specializations shall I loook for as a prospective LPN.

Thanks

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

JULES, A question If I May.....

R u aware of the LPN prospects here in NJ? I have of course "heard".... in the recent past 2-4 yrs ago "health care health care". Then I see in the papers everyday within the last year layoffs, closings etc. I am not entering the LPN field just for the money. I want to 'contribute' but are there real jobs out there for us. I have read articles that many RN's cannot find work so they are taking less preferred jobs to work (and pay off loans) and facilities are hiring more CNA's due to costs. I actually contacted some (4) LTC facilities in my area and the HR depts admitingly say they are slow to hire new right now just because positions are filled and they actually have waiting lists.

I am going to be careful in saying this butttt. App 5 yrs ago construction trades was the place to be and schools promoted those careers and the costs astronomical. We see were those jobs have went. 8 yrs ago computers 1/2 those schools gone... now fewer good paying jobs and lay offs. Now health care schools are all over Unbeleivable costs they are full but I have recently again started to here fewer and fewer jobs. Is it really possible we are creating to many personel for positions available.

I see the 8yr RN nurses with many certs have a much better job outlook but LPN CNAS and new Gen RN's seem to be going (do I dare say) way of the dinosaur possibly because of specialization, the new health care reform and politics there of, the economy. If specialization is a course what type of specializations shall I loook for as a prospective LPN.

Thanks

Hi, no clue as to job prospects in NJ, sorry. I'm working in the DC area now and jobs are not nearly as plentiful as years ago but still out there. My unit hired 3 new grad RNs but it seems to be important to apply before graduation and have something lined up for when the hospitals do their mass new grad orientation. If it is really difficult in your area a tech job might be the way to go as a segway into a position. It seems there is always a shortage of good techs. If you are hired and they get to know and love you if they hire LPNs you should be able to have a job waiting for you upon graduation. FWIW in my area LTC is always hiring all positions so although it might not be someone's first choice as a LPN it might be the best bet. Good luck.