Is it possible to get a RN job with a 2.92 GPA?

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by violetday violetday (New) New

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I've heard that students won't get hired if they have below a 3.0 GPA, it shows that they didn't take nursing school seriously. This is completely false for me and I wish I wasn't labeled by just my GPA. 

I've done my calculations and will be graduating with a 2.92 GPA. Is it possible to get a decent RN job with that GPA, or into any new grad residencies? I'm worried

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 4,021 Posts

I have never had a nurse recruiter or hiring manager ask what my GPA was as a new grad. They only care about you having your license. A nurse residency may be a totally different subject.

BiscuitStripes, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU. Has 2 years experience. 422 Posts

In my time as a nurse, I've worked in three different states and have applied, interviewed, and been offered many jobs.  Not once in any of these situations was I asked my GPA.

The only time I have seen GPA even potentially be a factor was for very competitive new grad programs at competitive hospitals in California, and even then, most don't ask. 

Don't worry about your GPA, and don't list it on your resume.  No one is going to ask for it.  As long as you're licensed, you're good to go. 

Edited by BiscuitStripes

vintagegal

vintagegal, BSN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics. Has 3 years experience. 231 Posts

Nobody asked me about my GPA. As far as I’m concerned if you passed your classes and the NCLEX you are safe to be a nurse unless proven otherwise

ThursdayNight, CNA

Specializes in Wiping tears. Has 4 years experience. 190 Posts

On 3/25/2021 at 10:58 PM, Violet Day said:

I've heard that students won't get hired if they have below a 3.0 GPA, it shows that they didn't take nursing school seriously. This is completely false for me and I wish I wasn't labeled by just my GPA. 

I've done my calculations and will be graduating with a 2.92 GPA. Is it possible to get a decent RN job with that GPA, or into any new grad residencies? I'm worried

I even heard that there are people who can pass NCLEX without being in the RN program. I don't know if this is a fact, but that's the anecdotal evidence I learned about. That's why you can't take an NCLEX without going to school and do clinicals.
 

PDXOR

PDXOR, MSN, RN

Specializes in Operating Room Charge Nurse. Has 5 years experience. 18 Posts

On 3/27/2021 at 12:12 PM, ThursdayNight said:

I even heard that there are people who can pass NCLEX without being in the RN program. I don't know if this is a fact, but that's the anecdotal evidence I learned about. That's why you can't take an NCLEX without going to school and do clinicals.
 

I believe it. There's enough NCLEX prep books, classes, and/or other resources that you could use to study from. If someone really wanted to put in the time to do this I could see them passing the NCLEX. 

Also, I have never had a job ask me what my GPA was. 

Jeckrn1

Jeckrn1, ADN, BSN

Specializes in Operating room, ER, Home Health. Has 23 years experience. 264 Posts

The only time I was ever asked about my GPA or a copy of my transcript is for the Military. The Federal government usually ask for a transcript but not always.  Most DON’s know that a GPA doesn’t make a nurse. 

Edited by Jeckrn1

DowntheRiver

DowntheRiver

Specializes in Urgent Care, Oncology. Has 8 years experience. 983 Posts

No one has asked me my GPA at this point for just a regular RN job. I have had to provider transcripts for most jobs, though, so I don't know if they peak at it then? Only one job demanded by diploma. 

However, I am almost done with a MSN ED. program and was informed by my advisor that GPA may be requested by future employers. That's OK because I have busted my butt in this program and have a 4.0 with 3 classes remaining. 

 

QqGgKk

QqGgKk, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in PHN and OR. Has 2 years experience. 50 Posts

I don’t think that you need a 3.0 GPA to get a job. I personally have a close to 4.0 GPA but I interviewed a few times prior to being offered a job. The good GPA may make you look good in resume but it doesn’t quarantine a job. In action, it may not be preferable in the scenario that your low academic performance manager may become insecure with your amazing GPA. The bottom line is that you don’t need a high GPA in applying for a job. The fact is that the company needs nurses with various skill sets and the fact that academic skills are simply one of it. 

However, the high GPA may be required when you are applying for graduate programs since they want to know your academic potentials. 

Hannahbanana, BSN, MSN

Specializes in Physiology, CM, consulting, nsg edu, LNC, COB. Has 52 years experience. 1,183 Posts

On 3/27/2021 at 3:12 PM, ThursdayNight said:

even heard that there are people who can pass NCLEX without being in the RN program. I don't know if this is a fact, but that's the anecdotal evidence I learned about. That's why you can't take an NCLEX without going to school and do clinicals.
 

You might be able to pass any exam if you’re good at test taking skills (which can be taught) and basic knowledge about the subject.

However, approval to take it rests c the BON. And no BON will let you take it without your having graduated from an accredited school that they approve. 
 

That said, if you have graduated from an accredited school, passed NCLEX, and possess a valid license, nobody’s going to ask you about your GPA when you’re job-hunting.

You might find, as I did, that a suboptimal undergraduate GPA might make it more of a challenge to get into a graduate program (never say never- someday you just might change your mind). I worked 3 full shifts a week as an aide plus ran a household and graduated from an excellent college of nursing with a bachelor’s at 21, zero desire to set foot in academia ever again, and a stellar 2.87 and happy to have it.
Seven yrs later I wanted to get a master’s so I could teach, having discovered a talent for that. I got 98-99th %iles in the GREs cuz I’m not stupid, but the admissions lady literally chuckled at my 2.87 when I applied. I said, “You can’t tell me I can never go to grad school because of my how my life was at 17-21.” She told me to go take a couple of graduate-level courses as a non-degree student and then we could talk. I did, aced them, and got into a top-3 program. You just never know what life will bring you. 
Good luck in your future! 

lpag789

lpag789, BSN, RN

Has 1 years experience. 54 Posts

I'm pretty sure if you graduate your program and pas the NCLEX, that's what matters to employers. I think the only exception to this would be for new grad residencies. Most say they give preference to 3.0 and over but I've seen a couple who state preference for 3.5 and higher.