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I turned in my mentor because she was diverting morphine

Addictions   (309 Views | 5 Replies)

InSchool4eva20 has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Instructor of Nursing and Med/surg nurse.

244 Profile Views; 46 Posts

I had to turn in a nurse who was my mentor, friend, and someone I had on a pedestal. She made my kids baby blankets, we would trade shifts and I caught her diverting morphine. Diverting from a patient who had acid burns on his face on hospice care in hospital. This happened several years ago and after I turned her in I found out she had three other occurrences reported. This was back when we wore crocs at work and she had slipped on ice and broke her leg and became addicted. Throughout the years I have caught two more, one other was a PICC line nurse who gave the patient morphine and I caught him injecting himself at the patients bedside. This is so haunting and traumatic for everyone involved. It makes you suspicious of everyone overtime and each time I discovered it was by accident. 

What are your experiences with this?  

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2 Followers; 1,040 Posts; 6,584 Profile Views

Traumatic is the exact word for it. I hate to see nurses become addicted. I can't imagine what they're thinking but it's great there are programs to help them kick the habit and continue in the profession.

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Emergent has 25 years experience.

9 Followers; 2 Articles; 3,181 Posts; 69,071 Profile Views

I turned in a co-worker once. It was very stressful at the time. It doesn't bother me now, he is back into a monitoring program and working as an IV therapist.

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amoLucia specializes in LTC.

2 Followers; 5,735 Posts; 47,708 Profile Views

Kudos to OP (and all others) for having the courage to do what most prob were some of the most difficult decisions ever to be made.

I've learned of nurses I've known/worked with who had similar addiction/diversion difficulties. Maybe because I'm one to just mind my own business when I went in, went home, went in, went home, etc, I never saw things occurring. And I was 11-7 LTC.

Even with narc counts, I don't recall ever being suspicious of anyone.

I guess that made me a lucky one.

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TriciaJ has 39 years experience as a RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

15 Followers; 3,873 Posts; 42,339 Profile Views

I guess I must have led a charmed life.  I can't imagine having to turn in someone I was close to and cared about.  I guess all you can do at the time is frequently remind yourself that you're really saving that person's life. 

 

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hppygr8ful has 18 years experience as a ASN, RN, EMT-I and specializes in Psych, Addictions, Elder Care, L&D.

8 Followers; 3 Articles; 3,089 Posts; 34,498 Profile Views

It does take courage to step forward if you suspect someone of Diversion - however this forum is more for nurses who engage in the care of person's suffering from the disease of addiction.  Maybe we need to start a forum that directly deals with reporting or put it under colleague relations.

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