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How Soon After Graduation Did You Take NCLEX?

NCLEX   (1,322 Views | 15 Replies)
by TONI SLOAN TONI SLOAN (New) New

111 Profile Views; 2 Posts

I am in an ADN program but completed the LPN requirements 12/11/19. I have already gotten my ATT for NCLEX-PN, but I needed some advice. I am torn between my options.

I am kinda wanting to take NCLEX before my 4th semester starts on 1/8/20. Our instructors have told us this would be the hardest semester of the program thus far. I also have to take microbiology this semester. If I take NCLEX before the semester begins, it would be one less worry and one less thing to study for.

I also feel like maybe I should wait and take it the end of January/first of February. Then I could run into the busyness of clinicals and tests of the current semester. 

I have been doing NCLEX style questions since the Christmas break started. My program uses ATI, and I scored a 99% predictability of passing NCLEX-PN first time. 

If I take it before semester 4 begins, I would have 7-12 days to study. My current study regimen is 50-75 NCLEX questions/day and read all rationales with PN Mastery. Write the ones I am struggling with. Watching videos and referencing textbooks with struggle areas. 

Do I feel comfortable? Nope. But, does anyone going into this test? lol

I don't know if I would be more comfortable wating or getting it over with.  

How long after graduation did you all wait before taking NCLEX? Did anyone take NCLEX while in the program? 

Are there any other NCLEX practice exams that give an estimated predictability of passing? 

I know it is my call as to what I feel is the best decision, but I just need some advice to help make my decision. What would you guys do?

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61 Posts; 733 Profile Views

I took NCLEX about a month and a half after graduation. I bought UWORLD and took the comp predictor test. Honestly, I wouldn't rely on predictability on whether you will pass or not. My school also did ATI and I always did horrible on them. ATI said I had ~50% chance of passing the NCLEX and the UWORLD comp test said I was borderline for passing.

I ended up passing on my first try with 75 questions. I think that it's better to take the NCLEX soon after graduation rather than waiting a few months. But, thats just me, some of my friends didn't take NCLEX until about 3-4 months after graduating and they passed. It really just depends on you. 

It's great that you are practicing questions. Another tip I can give you is to know you lab values & prioritization. At least for the NCLEX RN, I'm not sure if the NCLEX PN is similar or not. 

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1,048 Posts; 11,032 Profile Views

Is passing the NCLEX-PN required for a job or your program for any reason or are you wanting to take it for the experience?

I would definitely take it prior to the start of the semester and not have to worry about current semester, Micro, and trying to pass the NCLEX.

Best of luck

Edited by 203bravo

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FolksBtrippin is a BSN, RN and specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

3 Followers; 1,678 Posts; 14,911 Profile Views

Take NCLEX ASAP. You are going to pass it. Just get it out of the way.

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19 Posts; 196 Profile Views

To increase your chance of passing, you should take the NCLEX as early as possible. I believe years ago when I took the The NCLEX-PN, I took it a couple months after I graduated. That’s because I waited so long to get my ATT. the continental testing in my state moves slow. I passed it. Then, Years later When I took the NCLEX-RN, It was almost a few months after me graduating from the adn program took it. I passed it again.

The college that I went to also used ATI and my probability of passing was I think 97%.

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1 Post; 11 Profile Views

Sooner better than later. You will be fine, I took it 3wks after finishing my program. I studied using uworld. 

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1 Post; 29 Profile Views

I graduated in May. Got my ATT in June, took NCLEX a month after my ATT (I was working at the time so I wanted extra time to study), passed in 75 questions.

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12 Posts; 579 Profile Views

Graduated in May, but my school incorrectly submitted my transcript so I had to wait six months to take the test. This was kind of infuriating as I could feel the info draining away. I did 4 weeks of studying (mostly UWorld), which seemed to work really well. The rationales are great, and they are *incredibly* similar to the NCLEX itself.

I'm in the 48-hr window post NCLEX. It kicked me off right at 75 questions, it felt like it was mostly SATAs, and I've gotten the "good popup" from the Pearson site.

Just before I graduated my last Kaplan exam gave me a 97% probability of passing, but we'll see. But yeah, take it as soon as you can after graduation, while things are still fresh.

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FacultyRN has 12 years experience.

84 Posts; 654 Profile Views

Unless you are planning to work as an LVN during your last semester, or it is a requirement of your program, I wouldn't add one more expense/stressor to your load.  

Since you're months away from graduating, I would just wait and take the NCLEX-RN.  I don't think having an LPN license with 0 days of employment experience will help in your new grad RN job search. 

Additionally, a bad NCLEX-LPN testing experience would add additional stress heading into your NCLEX-RN. (I don't expect you'd have any problem based on your ATI though.)

As for your timeline question, I think it's best to take NCLEX as soon as you can after graduating when information is still fresh in your mind.  Some students do well with endless practice questions, but I think others get more discouraged.  My thought is after a good nursing program, and many practice questions throughout the program, you either know it or you don't by graduation.

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B52 has 9 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN and specializes in Psych, Substance Abuse.

167 Posts; 5,153 Profile Views

I agree with FacultyRN. I would not take the NCLEX-PN unless it was mandatory. 

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Nurse.Kelsey has 1 years experience as a RN and specializes in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology RN.

140 Posts; 1,112 Profile Views

Dont bother taking the PN if you arent even going to use it. Buckle down for school and continue to prepare with those nclex style questions you are doing. Good luck

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2 Posts; 111 Profile Views

Thanks guys! 

No, taking the NCLEX-PN is not mandantory but I have a LPN job to work flexi in my last semesters of nursing school. 

I am also averaging between 71-75% on PN Mastery Q-Bank. Their comp predictor doesn't give a percentage of passing. 

I think I am going to take it Friday! Fingers crossed for passing on the first try! 

Thanks again for all the advice! 🙂 

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