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How do you feel on displaying your certification credentials on your badge?

Nurses   (9,602 Views | 188 Replies)

choksantos has 17 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac TCU /tele/SDU.

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From what I can tell it is the norm for many/most hospitals to have staff wear plastic IDs that are larger than their name badge, that say "

RN" or "LPN".  I would rather it say just "NURSE" since that's all people are really trying to determine by staring at someone's chest anyway. 

 

I disagree. I'm often asked by patients if I am a registered nurse or an LVN. Some most definitely seem to care.

Edited by Horseshoe

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1 hour ago, Horseshoe said:

 

 

I disagree. I'm often asked by patients if I am a registered nurse or an LVN. Some most definitely seem to care.

That's interesting and honestly refreshing.  I haven't had that experience.  For the most part I have found patients just wanting "a nurse" or "my nurse".  It's good to know that some not only know there is a variety of types of nurses but what that difference might be, assuming they are asking for a reason.

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Asystole RN is a BSN, RN and specializes in Vascular Access, Infusion Therapy.

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On 9/14/2019 at 4:28 PM, klone said:

Why someone would go through and complete a BSN program, and not sit for the NCLEX.

Beyond not being able to pass there are those who no longer work clinically and for whatever reason wanted to retire their license but still wish to acknowledge their history. Not uncommon in some administration or in industry like pharma or medical device. 

I've also know a couple MDs that were once nurses and display their BSN as a sort of unity thing with the floor nurses. 

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klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

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48 minutes ago, Asystole RN said:

Beyond not being able to pass there are those who no longer work clinically and for whatever reason wanted to retire their license but still wish to acknowledge their history. Not uncommon in some administration or in industry like pharma or medical device. 

I've also know a couple MDs that were once nurses and display their BSN as a sort of unity thing with the floor nurses. 

Okay, but none of those are the circumstances of the poster in question. My “Why would someone do their BSN and not subsequently take the NCLEX” was more of a rhetorical question. 

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tacticool has 3 years experience and specializes in BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN.

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2 hours ago, Waiting for Retirement said:

That's interesting and honestly refreshing.  I haven't had that experience.  For the most part I have found patients just wanting "a nurse" or "my nurse".  It's good to know that some not only know there is a variety of types of nurses but what that difference might be, assuming they are asking for a reason.

Our hospital did away with LPNs. In the past I've had to do some things for a patient that the LPN couldn't do and explain to the patient why I was there. Not to mention having to do the LPN's admissions, plans-of-care, etc. 

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subee has 45 years experience as a MSN, CRNA.

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It seems kind of meaningless to me to use all the initials...the patients don't know what they mean , so we are doing it for each other?  Do MD's wear badges identifying their board certs?  And I see folks here use every set of initials they ever earned.  It's a nursing forum and I don't really care what you did before you became RN.

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Quote

It seems kind of meaningless to me to use all the initials...the patients don't know what they mean , so we are doing it for each other?  Do MD's wear badges identifying their board certs?  And I see folks here use every set of initials they ever earned.  It's a nursing forum and I don't really care what you did before you became RN.

I have often seen Docs wearing white coats with John Smith, M.D., P.A., FACP on them. Sometime "Cardiology" or their specialty on the second line. I always wondered why they bothered with the P.A. since the M.D. was the title with the most extensive scope.

ETA: I work in a private surgery center, so I no longer work at a hospital, so this could have changed.

 

Edited by Horseshoe

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Serhilda is a ADN, RN and specializes in Cardiac telemetry.

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I couldn't care less about displaying credentials. All patients see is an alphabet soup, and coworkers won't care. Achieve what you will for yourself, but there's no point in being a show off.

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What I object to is this:

An NP/PHD works in our ER.  His Badge gives his name as Dr. "John Doe".  He introduces himself as "Dr. John Doe".  The patients think he is a Physician and he does nothing to dispel that falsehood.  If he wanted to be known as a physician, he should have gone to medical school,, not NP school.  It's not the same game and Its not even the same sport.  I'm not saying he is not highly educated; I'm saying he is not educated as an M.D. or D.O..  He is educated as a Nurse Practitioner and he should claim it proudly or go to medical school.

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Nurse.Kelsey has 1 years experience as a RN and specializes in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology RN.

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14 minutes ago, mene19 said:

What I object to is this:

An NP/PHD works in our ER.  His Badge gives his name as Dr. "John Doe".  He introduces himself as "Dr. John Doe".  The patients think he is a Physician and he does nothing to dispel that falsehood.  If he wanted to be known as a physician, he should have gone to medical school,, not NP school.  It's not the same game and Its not even the same sport.  I'm not saying he is not highly educated; I'm saying he is not educated as an M.D. or D.O..  He is educated as a Nurse Practitioner and he should claim it proudly or go to medical school.

lol dang you are salty.

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choksantos has 17 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiac TCU /tele/SDU.

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25 minutes ago, mene19 said:

What I object to is this:

An NP/PHD works in our ER.  His Badge gives his name as Dr. "John Doe".  He introduces himself as "Dr. John Doe".  The patients think he is a Physician and he does nothing to dispel that falsehood.  If he wanted to be known as a physician, he should have gone to medical school,, not NP school.  It's not the same game and Its not even the same sport.  I'm not saying he is not highly educated; I'm saying he is not educated as an M.D. or D.O..  He is educated as a Nurse Practitioner and he should claim it proudly or go to medical school.

Yeah the original topic is about displaying credentials like CCRN,PCCN, CSC etc. on badges as a nurse.

 

The Ph.D. has earned him the right to be called Doctor, he is a doctor of philosophy, after all, doctorates are not limited to MD or DO.  Although in this case, it's a gray area where the circumstance and location are factors where one might easily think of him as an MD or DO. Although is he functioning within a scope of being an NP

Edited by choksantos

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Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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Badges shouldn't say "Dr." especially when it's an academic degree like PhD. Every physician I have ever worked with has "MD" or "DO" after their name. I don't think that is a gray area at all because it is in a clinical setting and is potentially misleading. 

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