94 or higher is an A?

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bgxyrnf, MSN, RN

1,208 Posts

Specializes in Med-Tele; ED; ICU. Has 10 years experience.
I find this really annoying that the school I want to go to... This is so crazy... they have such a low passing rate... I can't believe they haven't thought to change it...
You start by saying that you want to attend this program but then proceed to rip it.

Since you have such disdain for it, why on Earth would you want to go there?

~~~

The obvious answer to complaints about the grading scale is to simply score 100% in each class and don't worry about the scale. It can be done, you know.

Quota, BSN, RN

329 Posts

Specializes in Oncology, OCN. Has 4 years experience.

My high school graded on a similar scale. I was surprised when I went to college and they had a 10 point scale for grading (100-90, 89-80...). I have no problem with nursing school using what was a "normal" grading scale to me for years anyways.

Also agreeing that this is nursing school, you want everyone to truly learn the material and do well in these classes. Below an 80 really isn't doing well in a class.

Ellie G

186 Posts

My school was 93+ for an A. I worked full time and was a single parent. I had no grade lower than 91 which gave me a few B grades. At first it bothered me to make a B because I'd always been an A student, but I do feel my school prepared us well. Only one failed NCLEX. Back in the day when we had to wait 12 weeks for results. That was a long 12 weeks

Oceanblu

27 Posts

I guess I was so shocked by this because a 90 was always an A for me in school. And in some cases an 86 or higher was an A for when I was taking my hardest science classes. So I truly never actually thought that a 94 could be consider an A.

RNNPICU, BSN, RN

1,261 Posts

Specializes in PICU. Has 17 years experience.

This was my grading scale

[TABLE=width: 301]

[TR]

[TD]A[/TD]

[TD]94 -- 100%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]A-[/TD]

[TD]90 -- 93%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B+[/TD]

[TD]89 -86%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B[/TD]

[TD]85 -83%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B-[/TD]

[TD]82 -80%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]C+[/TD]

[TD]79 - 76%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]C[/TD]

[TD]75 - 73%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]C-[/TD]

[TD]72 - 70%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]D[/TD]

[TD]69 - 60%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]F[/TD]

[TD]59% or below[/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

WellThatsOod

897 Posts

Yup. Welcome to nursing school where C's are awesome, B's are the new A's, and A's don't exist. :p

Specializes in Palliative, Onc, Med-Surg, Home Hospice. Has 6 years experience.
I've found that the majority of programs work this way, often without rounding up either

My program worked this way and no rounding. Which sucked for those who were .1% away from a passing grade. I got all B's.

BeachsideRN, ASN

1,722 Posts

Specializes in NICU, Trauma, Oncology. Has 9 years experience.
My program worked this way and no rounding. Which sucked for those who were .1% away from a passing grade. I got all B's.

Yes we've had several fail by less than 0.1 point. One failed the semester by 0.05 points [emoji30]

ThePrincessBride, MSN, RN, NP

1 Article; 2,592 Posts

Specializes in Med-Surg, NICU. Has 8 years experience.

I am surprised to see so many schools not operate with +/- system. Anything between a 90 and 92 was considered an A minus in my program.

BBboy

252 Posts

Specializes in PICU, CICU. Has 2 years experience.

We need an 80 to pass and a 96 ​to get an A

Mahrn1

3 Posts

That sounds like my nursing school, but it was a 76 to pass.

[TABLE=class: cms_table, width: 301]

[TR]

[TD]A[/TD]

[TD]96 -- 100%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]A-[/TD]

[TD]92 -- 95%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B+[/TD]

[TD]88 -91%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B[/TD]

[TD]84 -87%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]B-[/TD]

[TD]80-83%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD]C+[/TD]

[TD]79 - 76%[/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD][/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD][/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[TR]

[TD][/TD]

[TD][/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

oldandintheway

81 Posts

Specializes in ED. Has 10 years experience.

I know that no one likes to hear old people take about "well back in my days" but when I returned to school in 2006 I was surprised that some of my school mates expected 90% to be an A in college. I also believe that grades are so instructor and school/program specific they are essentially meaningless as a broad comparison. After your first job interview or grad school no one is interested in your GPA, just in your competency.