94 or higher is an A?

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Specializes in Emergency. Has 21 years experience.

What's the problem? My diploma program was:

94-100 = A

87-93 = B

80-86 = C

I had a 93 average, so i was a b student. I was fine with that because letter grades mean nothing.

CountryMomma, ASN, RN

1 Article; 589 Posts

My program was similar - 92 was an A, 82 was failing. I started with 9 my RN year and 7 graduated, 6 passed the NCLEX. My school had high NCLEX pass rates and moderate attrition rates. I was ok with this.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

Every nursing program with which I've had any experience over the years, as a student or as a faculty member, used 93-100 or 94-100 as the range for an A. And responsible programs aren't looking to "increase their passing rate" by relaxing their standards. They want to turn out well-prepared graduates who will be competent nurses. Students maintain 4.0 GPAs in nursing school by working hard and making school their top priority.

111 graduates out of 130 original students isn't bad. How many of those 111 pass the NCLEX on their first try?

aeris99

490 Posts

Our program uses about the same scale for grading. Anything under an 80 is failing. Absolutely no rounding, ever. And they calculate out to four decimal places.

My cohort started with 40 students. We are down to 21. That might drop again in the next day to 19, with graduation 4 days away.

I wouldn't worry so much about the letter. I'd be more focused on keeping your eases high so you have a buffer when you get hit with a curveball.

Oceanblu

27 Posts

My program was similar - 92 was an A, 82 was failing. I started with 9 my RN year and 7 graduated, 6 passed the NCLEX. My school had high NCLEX pass rates and moderate attrition rates. I was ok with this.

Wow only 9???

Oceanblu

27 Posts

111 graduates out of 130 original students isn't bad. How many of those 111 pass the NCLEX on their first try?

Actually I just rechecked the pass rates to make sure and that was the year before that passing rate when 111 students passed. In 2015, 147 students were admitted and only 107 passed. Which is really bad.

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

Hey everybody - my newest soapbox is Grade Inflation.... it's a thing now.

Take a look at that link if you want to see how serious it is. Students feel that they 'deserve' high grades & get very upset if anything else happens. Student 'likes' are increasingly important in faculty performance ratings so they're reluctant to enforce academic rigor for fear of upsetting students. As a result, any educational pathway that has to achieve standardized outcomes (e.g., NCLEX) is having a rough time. Especially right now - after NCLEX 'passing' standards were increased not so long ago.

Although I was reluctant to see the advantages at first, I am beginning to think more positively about 'competency based' educational programs... where students must achieve specific objectives rather than grades. They can't go on to the next level until they meet the previous objectives. The emphasis shifts from GPA to outcomes. I'm seeing the merit.

Zibbie

58 Posts

Hey everybody - my newest soapbox is Grade Inflation.... it's a thing now.

Take a look at that link if you want to see how serious it is. Students feel that they 'deserve' high grades & get very upset if anything else happens. Student 'likes' are increasingly important in faculty performance ratings so they're reluctant to enforce academic rigor for fear of upsetting students. As a result, any educational pathway that has to achieve standardized outcomes (e.g., NCLEX) is having a rough time. Especially right now - after NCLEX 'passing' standards were increased not so long ago.

Although I was reluctant to see the advantages at first, I am beginning to think more positively about 'competency based' educational programs... where students must achieve specific objectives rather than grades. They can't go on to the next level until they meet the previous objectives. The emphasis shifts from GPA to outcomes. I'm seeing the merit.

I think this is so important. GPA does not show knowledge or ability to apply critical knowledge and yet it is a standard we use to prove worth. There should be greater emphasis on skill and application and I think we lose that when we put such heavy emphasis on GPA, especially when GPAs are distributed so unequally.

Purple_roses

1,763 Posts

My program is similar. 94 and above is an A, so it's very difficult to achieve a 4.0. I have not maintained my 4.0, though I've put in 100% of my effort. I keep getting 93s (it's enough to drive me crazy; though I'm still content knowing that I'm doing my best and learning a lot). The cut off score at my school is a 78%, so a bit more lenient than your school's cut off scores. I don't think you should worry though. If you work hard and dedicate enough time toward studying, you'll most likely be just fine.

Purple_roses

1,763 Posts

I've found that the majority of programs work this way, often without rounding up either

Yes, you can count on NO rounding. One in my cohort needed a 78% to pass and received a 77.5%. My nursing program does not allow any rounding, even if the teachers want to.

elkpark

14,633 Posts

Actually I just rechecked the pass rates to make sure and that was the year before that passing rate when 111 students passed. In 2015, 147 students were admitted and only 107 passed. Which is really bad.

"Really bad" how? That's a rate of around 73%. That's quite a bit higher than the US national average for college graduation (within six years of starting a degree), which is only 59%.

Fast Facts

HigherEdInfo.org: Graduation Rates