Help - Should I Work or Wait?

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I’m currently pregnant expecting my fourth child. I would like to work PRN at a local hospital (if they have a position that works for me). However, I know that I will not want to work postpartum- indefinitely. Raising babies is hard and important work! 

My concerns are that 1) They won’t hire me since I’m pregnant and might not return after maternity leave (is that discrimination?) and 2) a short few-months long of working will look bad on my future resume. I worked for that hospital for  3 months last year but left in good standing for other personal reasons. It’s so hard to work consistently with a family. I’m afraid if I don’t work now while I feel good I won’t work again for a couple of years. I love nursing.

Any thoughts? Thank you ☺️

Sour Lemon

Has 12 years experience. 5,015 Posts

3 hours ago, kat1822 said:

I’m currently pregnant expecting my fourth child. I would like to work PRN at a local hospital (if they have a position that works for me). However, I know that I will not want to work postpartum- indefinitely. Raising babies is hard and important work! 
My concerns are that 1) They won’t hire me since I’m pregnant and might not return after maternity leave (is that discrimination?) and 2) a short few-months long of working will look bad on my future resume. I worked for that hospital for  3 months last year but left in good standing for other personal reasons. It’s so hard to work consistently with a family. I’m afraid if I don’t work now while I feel good I won’t work again for a couple of years. I love nursing.
☺️Any thoughts?

Yes, they might not hire you if you're visibly pregnant, but they're probably not stupid enough to tell you that's why they're not hiring you. I'd go ahead and let go of the discrimination "case" right now.

Is the three month stint your only experience? If it is, it might look flaky to have another very short term gig and nothing else on your resume. If you have abundant experience, working a few extra months probably wouldn't have a positive or negative effect.

I would advise researching what your BON requires for license renewal if you're taking an extended amount of time off. Some require a certain amount of current experience, or they'll make you jump through some hoops.

kat1822, BSN, RN

33 Posts

I only have 3 months of experience, but it was on a busy stepdown tele unit and I was handling 5 pts virtually on my own by the time I left. I learned a lot in that short time. Before that, I had an externship at the same hospital for 6 full weeks. During nursing school, I was in two different programs (long story, basically one entire university shut down while I took a bit of time off from the program, so I had to retake some stuff in my new program). I have had clinicals in 8 different facilities around the state, so I've seen quite a bit. I have a lot more clinical hours than most grads. 

All that to say, surely it won't impact my hireability too much considering I have legitimate reasons for not working anything very long term? Namely, having babies and staying home with them for awhile...

I am keeping my license up to date. I finished my BSN last Summer and that bought me an extra 2 years before I need to do any more working/continuing education in my state.

Thanks!

Sour Lemon

Has 12 years experience. 5,015 Posts

2 hours ago, kat1822 said:

I only have 3 months of experience, but it was on a busy stepdown tele unit and I was handling 5 pts virtually on my own by the time I left.

A lot of hospitals won't consider you for a per diem position with such limited experience. Mine requires a minimum of two years, for example. The clinical experiences are part of school and don't count, even if you've had a lot of them. And three months (for the actual job) kind of sounds like you quit right after orientation and haven't worked on your own, at all.

A long break after such a short work history may certainly affect your hireability. A lot will depend on the market when you do decide to return, how picky you are about what sort of work you want to do, and whether or not you're willing to relocate if necessary.

I don't think I'd bother trying to gain a few more months of experience while pregnant and having three other kids to take care of, especially if there were no financial need. I don't see how it would add much to your resume.

 

 

nurse2b marty

1 Article; 4 Posts

Hi there! I am not a RN but I work at a post Acute care facility and I have noticed RNs come from agencies on an as needed basis? Maybe you can try something like that so you decide if you want to work that day or not, and in terms of the resume if you’re with the agency for sometime I think you’ll be okay? I would check with an agency hope that helps! 🙂 I think that would help in terms of if you are worried about taking time off then they can accommodate that. Best of luck to you!

Edited by nurse marty

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 30 years experience. 2,611 Posts

45 minutes ago, nurse marty said:

Hi there! I am not a RN but I work at a post Acute care facility and I have noticed RNs come from agencies on an as needed basis? Maybe you can try something like that so you decide if you want to work that day or not, and in terms of the resume if you’re with the agency for sometime I think you’ll be okay? I would check with an agency hope that helps! 🙂 I think that would help in terms of if you are worried about taking time off then they can accommodate that. Best of luck to you!

Unfortunately, the three months of experience issue also applies. Agencies generally want employees with more...

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience. 20,870 Posts

I would not advise PRN with so little experience. Go full/part time and get more. Or stay home til you are able to return and then go back. Congratulations.

RNNPICU, BSN, RN

Specializes in PICU. Has 16 years experience. 1,240 Posts

I think the 3 months of experience is what is limiting.  

Clinicals from nursing school are what help you graduate and are not independent practice no matter how much independence you had as a student. 

They are needing vaccinators now, perhaps pick up some experience that way.  

PRN positions require you to have the experience that you can just start a job right away.  Most PRN jobs will only give a 3 day orientation since you are already supposed to now how to function independently.  Not to say PRNs cannot ask questions, but shouldn't need the support or extra resources as they are an experienced staff member.

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience. 20,870 Posts

Having been PRN trust me, I was glad I had the experience I did. 2 years was barely enough to function like I had to.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,764 Posts

The facility will not hire you for PRN, you do not have enough experience. They also may not hire you because you left after three months.

"All that to say, surely it won't impact my hireability too much considering I have legitimate reasons for not working anything very long term? Namely, having babies and staying home with them for awhile..." Yes it will impact your hireability. Facilities do not care that you are staying home for the grand purpose of making babies. They want experienced professionals that have a record of stability with an employer.

I see two choices. Start part time now... take your maternity leave and return part time.

Stay off  until you are ready to go back. Then  hope you can find something with not a good track record.

 

Davey Do

Specializes in around 25 years psych, 15years medical. Has 43 years experience. 1 Article; 9,457 Posts

17 hours ago, kat1822 said:

 It’s so hard to work consistently with a family. 

I had a vasectomy in 1986 and called off one shift to sit at home with a pack of frozen peas on the surgical area.

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 25 years experience. 20,870 Posts

It IS hard to work consistently with a family. I did it and I know. But I planned ahead and worked around my husband's schedule once I got that 2 years' experience.  Childcare is nuts and it's hard. If you can make it without working, I would try if I were you.