A very trivial question about hair!

  1. I'm going to be entering an RN nursing program soon, and I'm wondering how people are about hair colors/styles as a nurse.

    See, I currently have pink hair [which I know is NOT going to fly, and I have to get rid of] but I was wondering if a dark reddish pink http://c3.ac-images.myspacecdn.com/i...d8ff75a6b6.png << Like that might be acceptable. I know things will vary from place to place [I'm planning on working in psych] but I'd just like some general opinions.

    If that's completely out of the question I'm just going to go a very platinum blonde, so please don't yell at me about my ridiculous hair color choice. :]
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    About amphigouri

    Joined: May '09; Posts: 5

    16 Comments

  3. by   jessi1106
    Hi, some nursing schools may have "rules" on hair color, etc...perhaps you should contact the school and inquire?
    As far as actually working....on my unit, things are pretty relaxed. We have some really bright red hair colors, piercings, tatoos etc. Acting in a professional fashion and giving excellent pt care is the bottom line (IMO at least).
    Good luck to you!
  4. by   ToxicShock
    Quote from jessi1106
    Hi, some nursing schools may have "rules" on hair color, etc...perhaps you should contact the school and inquire?
    As far as actually working....on my unit, things are pretty relaxed. We have some really bright red hair colors, piercings, tatoos etc. Acting in a professional fashion and giving excellent pt care is the bottom line (IMO at least).
    Good luck to you!
    Shoot, I wanna work with you! Do they care much about full sleeve tattoos?
  5. by   MurseMikeD
    If it's a question of will you be "allowed" to have that hair, then the answer is it's up to the individual nursing education program and each hospital.

    Even here in the San Francisco Bay area some places are really liberal (i.e. Highland ED where several nurses have facial piercings and brightly colored hair) and others are really conservative (John Muir ICU, where they don't wear print scrub tops).

    If it's a question of what "should" you do... well, I guess that's a matter of opinion. Maybe it's because I come from working in fire/rescue and EMS, but I think your appearance as well as your conduct should project you as a professional. Many patients, especially those of an older generation may not have as much confidence in a nurse who doesn't "look the part."

    I'd consider the effect you want your appearance to have on the people you work with and treat, whether or not that's important to you, and act accordingly.
  6. by   Virgo_RN
    Quote from MurseMikeD
    Many patients, especially those of an older generation may not have as much confidence in a nurse who doesn't "look the part."
    While this may be historically true, the patient population is changing, and with that, the perceptions of appropriate attire, hairstyles, tattoos, piercings, etc. are changing as well. It also depends upon the community in which you live, i.e. Seattle or San Francisco vs. the deep South.
  7. by   MurseMikeD
    Quote from Virgo_RN
    While this may be historically true, the patient population is changing, and with that, the perceptions of appropriate attire, hairstyles, tattoos, piercings, etc. are changing as well. It also depends upon the community in which you live, i.e. Seattle or San Francisco vs. the deep South.
    I live and work in the San Francisco area, and I can certainly vouch for that. Why take that chance though when you may be the face a patient looks up at and needs to have confidence in on the "worst day of their life"?

    All I'm saying is OP should consider the issues at hand and make a decision on what's most important to them.
  8. by   RNperdiem
    When it comes to being different in fashion and style, I believe that people are divided into two groups: those that can get away with it and those that don't.
    It helps if you are popular, young and attractive.
    If you feel that you need to ask that question, then maybe platinum blonde is for you.
  9. by   chicookie
    It depends on the program and the instructor. In my NS there were this girls I thought they were awesome one had black and white hair and the other had pink pink hair. I thought they looked great for the first 3 semesters no one told them anything at all. That last semester their nursing instructor told them they couldn't wear it like that anymore. So they changed it. This morning I saw one of the girls and she is back to her old ways and working in the peds unit. =D
  10. by   NewRN2008
    I agree with others, you need to start with worrying about what the school will tell you first. then when you get on your own, you need to worry about what your facility will tell you then. after that, you do what you see fit and all that jazz.
    -H-RN
  11. by   DeeAngel
    I would have my hair be a "normal" color until I learn the culture of the particular school I was attending. Schools can range from quite relaxed to quite rigid and you need to know what your school is. I can see that hair color putting some instructors off and ******* off the instructors from your first day is not going to make things easier for you.

    IMHO this is not a good or advantageous way to start nursing school. School is difficult and demanding enough with out adding hair drama to the mix.
  12. by   Aneroo
    If you have to ask, then the chances are no. If I were an instructor, I wouldn't allow the hair in the picture (I think it's cute, just not appropriate for the clinical learning setting). I'm from the south, so they're more strict here though. I would imagine if I had grown up in a liberal area, it might be different.
  13. by   GOMER42
    Looking ahead past school, I think you would find it hard to find employment going into an interview with hair like that.
    You represent a hospital and school in addition to yourself.
  14. by   Reno1978
    It's up to the dress code of the nursing program and the hospital(s) you may be working in for clinicals. Most describe hair color as it must be of a color that occurs in nature.

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