Quit while on orientation

  1. Hello,

    I would like some opinions. I am currently on orientation but was offered a new job elsewhere. The new job pays considerably more. I'm a new grad RN but have extensive experience in other aspects of healthcare. I will not go into further detail about that. I don't think I will be able to give proper notice to current employer.

    What is the best way to notify current employer? I'm pretty sure I will not just be burning this bridge but blowing it up. I am overall satisfied with current employer but cannot pass up this new opportunity. Any ideas?

    There is more to this whole thing but I don't want to go into extensive detail for fear of being recognized.

    Thank you all.
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    About Throwaway11

    Joined: Aug '18; Posts: 5; Likes: 11
    from OK , US

    36 Comments

  3. by   beekee
    Any employer should understand that you need to give at least 2 weeks' notice to your current employer. In fact, if they know you are employed, I think it'd look bad (to the new employer) that you don't give proper notice. However, be aware that if you give notice on orientation, it is quite likely that you will not be required to work out your notice.
  4. by   Daisy4RN
    I think you should give a 2 week notice and an extra excuse as to why you are leaving, better for my family, closer drive etc. (better to burn than to blow up, nursing is a small world) And, if you are "overall satisfied" with your current job I would think twice about accepting a different job based on higher pay alone.
  5. by   Silly_Sally_RN
    I would see if your employer has a policy on how much notice is required to leave in good standing. I know my facility has one and requires licensed professionals to give 4 weeks notice.
  6. by   Twinmom06
    I did the same thing. I was hired at a hospital with a promise to orient to the unit I really wanted after I oriented to med surge/tele. When I asked the educator about the timing, I was informed that while the recruiter told me that, it wasn't happening. So I pursued a job closer to home with a $10 per hour increase in pay and got the job. When I gave my notice I was basically told that my services were no longer necessary. So I promised them a month and they told me not to come back at all.
  7. by   caffeinatednurse
    Been there, done that.

    Be aware that your current employer could put you on a black list to keep you from taking up precious orientation resources again in the future. This may or may not be a big deal for you. But do keep in mind that even small hospitals are owned by bigger corporations that own other hospitals and doctor's offices...and that they often share a large HR office that processes the same applications. This is what happened to me as a new grad.

    Either way, it is not a decision to be made lightly. If you're satisfied with your current employer, and the move is just for $ you could be making a big mistake. And "dream jobs" in nursing rarely turn out to be such. Just something to keep in mind.

    At the very least, give a notice and a decent recent why you're leaving. But don't be surprised if they show you the door immediately.
  8. by   SC_RNDude
    Why would any employer want a orientee to stick around for 1 more day let alone 2 or 4 weeks????

    Whenever you give your notice will likely be your last day.
  9. by   hherrn
    I doubt they care about the two week notice- why would they want to invest any more into you?

    I am not sure it matters to them how you tell them. look at it this way- if the situation was reversed, and at this point in the job they fired you because they had somebody they just couldn't pass up, would you care how they told you?

    While it may not matter to them, it may matter to you. If it was me, I think I would ask for a sit down with my manager, give them a brief, simple explanation, and apologize for the inconvenience. If there is some incredibly compelling justification- the new job includes free dialysis for your child, maybe include that.
  10. by   Throwaway11
    Thanks to everyone for the replies. To add a little more to the story, I have been employed with the current employer for years now in other capacities. So it's a little different then someone that just started working there. I am glad that I am not the only that has quit a new grad position for higher pay etc...

    The pay difference is not the only reason that I want to leave but is a huge factor.

    I think I will have a chat with my manager and see how it goes.
  11. by   Jedrnurse
    Quote from Silly_Sally_RN
    I would see if your employer has a policy on how much notice is required to leave in good standing. I know my facility has one and requires licensed professionals to give 4 weeks notice.
    Out of curiosity, do they give employees 4 weeks notice for lay-offs?
  12. by   caliotter3
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    Why would any employer want a orientee to stick around for 1 more day let alone 2 or 4 weeks????

    Whenever you give your notice will likely be your last day.
    I gave notice one time and wasn't even allowed to go near the work floor. Straight to the manager's office where he immediately did the HR paperwork and I was shown the door. Probably lasted less than 30 minutes, can't even remember. Give proper notice and count on not serving out the full notice.
  13. by   adventure_rn
    Quote from SC_RNDude
    Why would any employer want a orientee to stick around for 1 more day let alone 2 or 4 weeks????

    Whenever you give your notice will likely be your last day.
    I agree. At all of the facilities where I've worked, you were allowed to quit without giving notice during your 90 day probation period (in the same way that they were allowed to fire you without cause during your 90 day probation period). If you're quitting on orientation, they wouldn't want to spend any more money orienting you. I'd look at your facility's policies, as they may specify if you need to give notice during your 'probation' period.

    That being said, do realize that you may be made ineligible for rehire with that hospital system (in case you had ever hoped to work there, for instance in a PRN role).
  14. by   caffeinatednurse
    I would not want to burn bridges with a company I had worked for, for years. What if you change your mind later on down the road and decide that you want to work for them? You might not be able to then.

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