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Desperate and need advice

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You are reading page 2 of Desperate and need advice. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

See your doctor. This is fixable, but the onus to fix it falls on you, not the school.

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I have a similar issue- mine is comorbid with my learning disorder. I would definitely see my doctor at this point, especially if the sleep meds aren’t working. I think the only reason mine isn’t gonna be a huge issue is I only have to adjust my schedule by about 2 hours , as I’ve had to get my kiddos to school for a few years now. 

I would also get this documented and request accommodations through the schools disabilty center. 

It’s immensely difficult to shift it, and when you’re completely sleep deprived everything looks awful. (To quote fight club:  “everything is like a copy of a copy of a copy”) 

I sympathize, but I will say, there are ways to temporarily shift this - if you don’t have class or clinical over the summer you can shift it gradually which is what I had to do. It’s brutal but doable. Something I used to do before kids, was I’d work 5a-2, come home, nap til 730/8pm and then “nap” again for a few hours til 4 around 2. Some folks can survive if they split up their sleep into 2 chunks provided you get enough REM. 

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Stick with it, sounds like you are a natural for night shift!  You wouldn't by chance be going to Chaminade on Oahu would you?  Sketchy program at best.

 

Cheers

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If you have a medically diagnosed disorder, I would think schools have to make reasonable accommodations for you. From what you wrote it sounds like you actually have a medical issue, and it's not a matter of taking melationin or making sure the bedroom is for sleep only.

I can see that you are trying to make it work. It might be worth looking into another nursing program that has the schedule you need if you can't depend on the info being told to you at your current school.

Please do not drive on one hour's sleep. There are others on the road and it's silly to risk others lives because you have to get to a clinical.

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On 2/11/2019 at 5:51 AM, Jory said:

That is why even if you can't sleep, it's important to at least lay in bed and rest and try to turn off your thoughts.  

OP this is saving me in nursing school.. this advice is GOLDEN

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Have you tried any prescription sleeping meds? Something like Ambien might work well for you to get through clinicals. I would discuss it with your doctor. I have a similar natural sleep schedule and it worked well for me in the past. 

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I am also a night owl.  You have been given some good advice - the link to the article on delayed sleep syndrome has excellent advice.  I had to be at my clinicals at 6 am (one hour before shift start) and sometimes had a 30 to 45 minute commute to get there on top of that, but I made it.  My natural body clock is to go to bed at 1 am to 2 am and get up between 9 and 10 am, but that would make it very difficult to hold down any sort of professional job.  I have trained myself to go to bed about 11 pm and also take Ambien and trazodone.  You have to train yourself to go to sleep earlier, and you can also use a mild sleep medication like Ambien and/or trazodone.  The nursing school does not have to guarantee you afternoon or evening clinicals - it is hard to get clinicals for students.  Good luck.

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On 2/11/2019 at 12:54 AM, Been there,done that said:

 These questions are for your doctor and your academic advisor.   The school does not owe you any accommodations. 

Nursing is  physically and emotionally demanding. Some health issues can interfere with safe patient care.  Taking Xanax,and doxepin will not go over well with your employers, prescribed or not.

With your medical issues, I would rethink my career.

 Best wishes.

Huh??  Taking a prescribed benzodiazepine and a TCA are going to be frowned on by a potential employer?  That this nursing student should rethink their career path?   That he/she will be incapable of performing their nursing duties in a safe manner?  Wow! Really?  That sounds like some serious stigmatization.  You do realize that there are hundreds of thousands of fully functioning and capable nurses who just so happen to be diagnosed with a mental disorder and take polypharmacy to manage their illness(es)??

Edited by morelostthanfound

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I have no advice besides what others have said.  Try to do the re-learning of moving your bedtime forward or backward an hour or so every few days until you, hopefully, get to the place you need to be.  

Perhaps an occasional hypnotic (Ambien, Chloral Hydrate, Dalmane) could help you get at least 5 or 6 hours of sleep, good REM sleep, deep sleep.

Oh,  BTW, you don't have to tell anyone you are taking meds (if you are taking any).  As long as you are functioning, it is no one's business - not the school's, not an employer's.  Just don't talk it about it EVER to anyone, especially at work.  Your secrets with quickly become fodder for gossip all over the school or job.  I mean it - not a single word to friend, foe, boss, peer, anyone.

 

Warm bath?  Warm milk?  Yoga or other meditation/relaxation/breathing techniques?  Total darkness, phone totally off, doorbell disconnected.

I wish you the very best.

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On 2/11/2019 at 2:54 AM, Been there,done that said:

Nursing is  physically and emotionally demanding. Some health issues can interfere with safe patient care.  Taking Xanax,and doxepin will not go over well with your employers, prescribed or not.

I get that taking a benzo will not go over well with an employer, but doxepin?

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3 hours ago, FeliciaRNCPN said:

I get that taking a benzo will not go over well with an employer, but doxepin?

The use of doxepin may or may not become evident. That would depend on the facility, and the specific screen used. Doxepin can cause some nasty false positives.

When benzos are found, OP  would be asked  a lot of questions.

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2 hours ago, Been there,done that said:

The use of doxepin may or may not become evident. That would depend on the facility, and the specific screen used. Doxepin can cause some nasty false positives.

When benzos are found, OP  would be asked  a lot of questions.

^^^No, wrong!^^^  Not a lot of questions. If asked by a manager and you are forthcoming, offer current/valid proof of prescription from a licensed medical provider, and are taking the medications as prescribed, there are no other questions.  The one caveat to this is Sinequan's strong sedative properties-taking it before or during work probably is not a good idea.

Edited by morelostthanfound

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