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guest974915

guest974915

Member Nurse
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guest974915's Latest Activity

  1. guest974915

    Disrespect & Profanity

    You're missing the point-some people (especially older), prefer a more formal greeting-"Mr./Mrs.", some people prefer a middle or a nickname, some people prefer an alternative pronoun. It's professional courtesy to address people in a manner in which they prefer.
  2. guest974915

    Disrespect & Profanity

    Not real sure I'm understanding? Regardless of age, gender, race, rank, social class...a safe, initial introduction would go something like; "Hello, my name is [insert name]. I am a Registered Nurse and I will be caring for you this evening until 11:00 P.M. Could you please tell me your name and how you prefer to be addressed?".
  3. guest974915

    Disrespect & Profanity

    ^^^Disagree and I'm siding with Davey on this. First of all, Clark sounds like a complete heel with a serious case of arrested development and I found Davey Do's approach to him entirely appropriate. Having dealt with this personality type before, I know that subtleties are usually ineffective, hence the need for blunt and pointed dialogue. Nursing report is not the time to shoot the bull and talk about the upcoming weekend, it is a time to communicate pertinent patient information and facilitate continuity of care. If Clark was blathering on and a critical bit of report-i.e. a patient's critical lab, consent, unverified order.... was missed, it could potentially have serious consequences. As such, Clark's interference could be viewed as a patient safety concern.
  4. ^^^^Completely agree! I have long thought that academia is entirely out of step with nursing practice. At the curricular level, I remember the hours and hours spent in the classroom learning NANDA nursing diagnoses. In the real world, no one give two whits about care planning (other than to check off the mandatory boxes in their documentation). Then, as touched on above, nursing theory-I'm sorry but some of these theories are so arcane and just wacky-really? No practical application whatsoever! Lastly, APA ad nauseum; When what you say (write) means little but the complete preoccupation with capitalization, commas, and citations-give me a break!
  5. guest974915

    Disrespect & Profanity

    Kudos Davy Do and this is also a major pet peeve of mine also. Not that I am prudish or don't use profane words sometimes myself, but never in a professional setting or in the company of someone that I don't well. I guess this reticence stems from my (our) age and upbringing, but to me, regardless of someone's class or status, this kind of talk comes just across as trashy, ignorant, and inarticulate-not cool or hip. I'm going to catch heat for this also, but the same goes for a person's appearance and presence.
  6. guest974915

    Just Say “YES” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Wow! Unless I'm mistaken, you weren't drafted into military service but are voluntarily serving. Also, your immature, over the top machismo is only surpassed by your ignorance of the subject matter and quite frankly, I'm embarrassed for you:(
  7. guest974915

    Just Say “YES” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Without imposed governmental regulations, do you think the labor bosses of old would have voluntarily stopped the systematic exploitation of children in mines? What about the other innumerous, inhumane, and dangerous labor practices commonplace in our country during and following the Great Depression. While at work, when you enjoy your 30 minute lunch and 15 minute breaks, be grateful for governmental regulations!
  8. guest974915

    At a crossroads

    I'm a very sensitive person also so I totally understand and can relate. Unfortunately, people are people and in almost every job that I have ever held (outside of nursing and within), there always seems to be the same personality types including the toxic coworker(s). Also, like you, I also prefer workplaces that are organized and the expectations of the role are clear. Personally, I would focus on finding as low stress a job as possible and as nursy above suggested, focus on some 'you time', including therapy. Take care of yourself first and foremost!
  9. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    I’ve worked in California and its staffing model works well. As such, it could serve as a template for other states until the current system can be overhauled or drastically revamped. Other states’ experiences with the flexible model (as advocated by the ANA), prove that it is ineffective and untenable!
  10. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Like Tenebrae, RN, BSN, I too am completely gobsmacked that any nurse involved in direct patient care would not immediately support rigid staffing mandates akin to California's. I guess it all comes down to being a matter of perspective. Maybe when you in academia or seated in a comfortable administrative office, removed from the immediacy and necessity of the matter, can it then be a matter of debate.
  11. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    This^^^ Having worked all over the US as a travel nurse, I can assure you that many of these flexible staffing models consistently fail to capture an inpatient unit's true acuity and staffing needs. I favor California's approach where subjectivity is removed and grids, graphs and matrices can't be skewed by management to cover up a flawed, ineffective and danger staffing model.
  12. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    These flexible staffing models sound good in theory but unfortunately, in the real world they have no teeth and are often disregarded by many hospitals. Sadly, with these mandates, there is much room for interpretation, and that is often an open door for manipulation which tips in favor of management and results in higher acuity/patient loads for nurses.
  13. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Don’t be fooled; the ANA is plenty cozy with HCA and other large heath system conglomerates. Their advocacy and alliance for rank and file RNs is always trumped by its support for those who profit the most from corporate healthcare:(
  14. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Having worked at hospitals that have outsourced nutrition and housekeeping services along with security, I would say the answer to that question is a resounding 'yes'. If those shortsighted approaches don't appease the MBA numbers crunchers, then there's always the implementation of skeleton staffing, the slashing of employee benefits and wage stagnation to fall back on.
  15. guest974915

    Just Say “NO” to Nurse Staffing Laws

    Agree with Jedrnurse here. Sorry to say, but the American Nurses Association is in bed with corporate health care and as such, any position that they endorse is spurious to me and likely taken for political gain, not advocacy! A closer examination of the issue would show that while CA N/P mandates were somewhat responsible for hospitals' "cut funding for supplies, upgrades and education and holding patients longer in the ER", the CEOs and senior management continued to enjoy exorbitant salaries, company benefits, perks, and golden parachutes-odd, no cuts there. It is 'all about the money'.
  16. I am an experienced OR nurse and have circulated/scrub quite a few robotic procedures. However, this week was a new one for me-a Robotically-assisted G-tube insertion. To me, this approach seemed rather extreme, when a PEG tube procedure could have accomplished the same results, have been done with much less anesthesia time, no trocar port insertion sites, and been much cheaper. Thoughts?