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yourstrulynurse87 yourstrulynurse87 (New Member) New Member Nurse

Can a registered nurse work as a medical assistant

Nurses   (949 Views 16 Comments)
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Hello fellow nurses.

Quick Background: I have been a registered nurse for 3 years in General Medicine and had a critical background experience in the PACU for a year. I had to take a career break to be a full-time caregiver of my ill-parent. After a year of being out of the workforce, I am now ready to refocus my career.

I have been on a job search for 2 months now and I did not get any phone calls from anybody I applied for yet. BTW, I only applied for jobs that I know I am qualified (considering the minimum qualifications). I am now worried about my employment gap. I wanted to get a job ASAP that is in line with my healthcare background. I am now considering applying for a Medical Assistant or Phlebotomy job. One of the requirements in the MA job is to be RMA or MA certified. And as for the Phlebotomy job, holding a valid Phlebotomy certification is a must.

Is it not almost if not all of the MA's and Phlebotomist job descriptions and responsibilities are more or less the same as the nurse? In fact, nurses have broader scope of practice than them. So, is there any possibility for me to be hired as a Medical Assistant or a Phlebotomist?

Thanks in advance for your replies.

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Have you looked more broadly for other RN options? There are other RN jobs that are outside hospitals such as LTC, home health, etc. Since you have bedside experience, I would assume you qualify for those? 

If you must take an MA or phlebotomy position, be aware that you are required to be covered under professional liability insurance as an RN. Having said that, your malpractice risk is probably going to be rather low in those roles.

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I would highly advise against it , I’m not sure where are you located but your experience is enough to get a decent nursing job. I would advise that you continue to apply for nurse  position  , also try to reach out to the  recruiter directly . Do you have any contact with people from you me previous employment ? If so, I would also advise that you reach out to those people as well.

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,You will most likely be wasting your time in applying for MA jobs as no employer will think they can get an RN to work for wages that low and they do not want to pay the minimum wage an RN would expect to do the job.  While you are applying for regular RN positions look to the companies that do flu shot and wellness clinics for short term employment opportunities.  A good way to get a more recent RN job title on the resume.

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A one year gap is not that long. Have you looked at clinics and long term care facilities? It sounds like with your background you would be a great addition to RN staff in those facilities. I also think you will probably not be considered for MA jobs because employers will assume that you will quickly move on to something more related to your licensure. Good luck!

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Thank so much for all your inputs! I live in Texas, I have applied to both long term care and skilled nursing facilities as well. I am just wondering why it took so much time for them to contact potential candidates to fill in vacant positions. I am thinking that those kinds of facilities would have high turnovers due to the fact that they have lower pay than hospitals. I am considering contacting recruiters as well however somebody advised me that talking to recruiters are a waste of time as they usually do not work on your favor. I feel the same way when submitting my applications online. It is as if that after I completed the application and clicked the "Submit" button, it goes directly to a loophole.

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Have you looked into any local agencies in the mean time? It might not be idea or as permanent/stable as full time employment in a hospital, but I would think it would look a lot better on your resume plus pay more than an MA or Phlebotomy job while you are still looking for a full time position. 

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What distance are you considering? It may help to increase the distance from your home, within reason.

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7 hours ago, yourstrulynurse87 said:

Thank so much for all your inputs! I live in Texas, I have applied to both long term care and skilled nursing facilities as well. I am just wondering why it took so much time for them to contact potential candidates to fill in vacant positions. I am thinking that those kinds of facilities would have high turnovers due to the fact that they have lower pay than hospitals. I am considering contacting recruiters as well however somebody advised me that talking to recruiters are a waste of time as they usually do not work on your favor. I feel the same way when submitting my applications online. It is as if that after I completed the application and clicked the "Submit" button, it goes directly to a loophole.

Talking directly tor recruiter can help  , if they like your application , they can bring it  to the attention of the  hiring manager quicker.

Edited by johsonmichelle

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The MA at my former PCP was a LPN who had gone back to the RN bridge program but never finished. They paid her at the top of the MA scale. She told me she took the job because it was M-F guaranteed hours of 7:30-4:30 and no weekends with no call.

Since she was hired in the MA role she did refer to herself as a MA and not a LPN.  

So yes, you can do it, but I would advise against it. A year isn't that long and I'm sure with an on the job refresher you'd do just fine back on the floor or in a clinic.

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8 hours ago, yourstrulynurse87 said:

Thank so much for all your inputs! I live in Texas, I have applied to both long term care and skilled nursing facilities as well. I am just wondering why it took so much time for them to contact potential candidates to fill in vacant positions. I am thinking that those kinds of facilities would have high turnovers due to the fact that they have lower pay than hospitals. I am considering contacting recruiters as well however somebody advised me that talking to recruiters are a waste of time as they usually do not work on your favor. I feel the same way when submitting my applications online. It is as if that after I completed the application and clicked the "Submit" button, it goes directly to a loophole.

Most LTCs usually pay more than hospitals, as they are not as "glamorous" as hospitals.  Good luck with your job search, let us know how it's going

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Hi Nurses. Good news! I got an interview last week and the DON hired me on the spot and offered me the night shift position. Although I accepted the job offer, I do not like working night shifts so I opt for the day shift position which they do not have an open position yet. So she told me that she will hold off first and will contact me if a day shift position opens. Now, I have some questions that need clarifications and would be happy to hear from fellow nurses before contacting the facility’s DON.

1.)   Am I really hired?

2.)   Can the DON revoke her verbal statement that she hired me without a written document or contract?

3.)   When can I expect a written offer?

4.)   Can I possibly contact other potential employers at this time?

I am so confused. Thank you so much in advance for your responses!

 

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