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BEDSIDE...run, don't walk!

Posted

Has 10 years experience.

I don't know who needs to hear this today, BUT...

You are NOT required to martyr yourself for the sake of the nursing profession!

You are a human being, and deserve a lovely life.

You deserve to wake up everyday and not feel knots in your stomach while preparing to go to work.

You deserve BETTER!

The day I transitioned away from the (abusive) hospital system was the day my life started to significantly improve. I've never looked back, and the thought of having to subject myself to the poor working conditions ever again makes me sick to my stomach. I don't envy my friends/professional colleagues who decided to "stick it out" even though they were admittedly suffering.

I'd encourage anyone, new-grads or more tenured nurses, to RUN don't walk away from the hospital system if it's negatively impacting you.

Ignore the zealots who tout it as a calling, that you must give your everything... That's logic is beyond stupid! You are not required to subject yourself to abuse.

Edited by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN

mmc51264, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in orthopedic; Informatics, diabetes. Has 9 years experience.

I have an MSN and CHOOSE to be at the bedside. I love it. I don't want to be anywhere else. I work for a great organization and while it is very large, it tries very hard to take care of us.

During Covid, they have been amazing. I think it is not fair to generalize that all bedside nursing is bad. Just because it is not for you does not mean it is not fir anyone. I work with nurses that have spent 25+ years at the bedside and they still like coming to work.

Some just can't cut it bedside 😉

6 minutes ago, mmc51264 said:

I have an MSN and CHOOSE to be at the bedside. I love it. I don't want to be anywhere else. I work for a great organization and while it is very large, it tries very hard to take care of us.

During Covid, they have been amazing. I think it is not fair to generalize that all bedside nursing is bad. Just because it is not for you does not mean it is not fir anyone. I work with nurses that have spent 25+ years at the bedside and they still like coming to work.

Some just can't cut it bedside 😉

If your organization has been "amazing" during Covid, you are the exception, not the rule. We are required to report any Covid-like symptoms (even if minor), accept a Covid test and wait for the result while burning through PTO. Nurses are starting to hide their symptoms.

JadedCPN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU. Has 15 years experience.

14 hours ago, mmc51264 said:

I have an MSN and CHOOSE to be at the bedside. I love it. I don't want to be anywhere else. I work for a great organization and while it is very large, it tries very hard to take care of us.

During Covid, they have been amazing. I think it is not fair to generalize that all bedside nursing is bad. Just because it is not for you does not mean it is not fir anyone. I work with nurses that have spent 25+ years at the bedside and they still like coming to work.

Some just can't cut it bedside 😉

What a passive-aggressive, gaslighting thing to say.

The OP did not generalize all bedside nursing as bad and in fact stated specifically that the advice is only for people with negative experience at the bedside.

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

14 hours ago, 2BS Nurse said:

If your organization has been "amazing" during Covid, you are the exception, not the rule. We are required to report any Covid-like symptoms (even if minor), accept a Covid test and wait for the result while burning through PTO. Nurses are starting to hide their symptoms.

Same in my organization....

JabuJabule, LPN

Specializes in LTC. Has 2 years experience.

I personally love working bedside! I'm only at my first job though, we'll see where I end up. :)

CaffeinePOQ4HPRN, BSN, MSN, LPN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

On 8/18/2020 at 8:10 PM, mmc51264 said:

Some just can't cut it bedside 😉

Or, perhaps some of us Nurses just have integrity, self-respect, and healthy self-esteem that we don't feel a need to tolerate being treated like garbage 😉

Edited by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

On 8/18/2020 at 12:11 PM, CaffeinePOQ4HPRN said:

I don't know who needs to hear this today, BUT...

You are NOT required to martyr yourself for the sake of the nursing profession!

You are a human being, and deserve a lovely life.

You deserve to wake up everyday and not feel knots in your stomach while preparing to go to work.

You deserve BETTER!

The day I transitioned away from the (abusive) hospital system was the day my life started to significantly improve. I've never looked back, and the thought of having to subject myself to the poor working conditions ever again makes me sick to my stomach. I don't envy my friends/professional colleagues who decided to "stick it out" even though they were admittedly suffering.

I'd encourage anyone, new-grads or more tenured nurses, to RUN don't walk away from the hospital system if it's negatively impacting you.

Ignore the zealots who tout it as a calling, that you must give your everything... That's logic is beyond stupid! You are not required to subject yourself to abuse.

I don’t think every bedside nursing job is bad but I will say that nursing and healthcare has changed drastically throughout the years - and not necessarily for the better for nurses, physicians, or patients. Nursing is simply not what it was a decade or two decades ago. I have seen my healthcare system change in just under a decade.....I am choosing to leave the ER and go to a different bedside job not because I don’t like it, but because I feel a different job without the constant pressures can make my life so much less stressful when I have other things going on in my life.

CommunityRNBSN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community health. Has 3 years experience.

I know a lot of people who love love love hospital nursing. I am not one of them, and I work in an FQHC. But I'm glad not everyone wants to flee hospitals! Otherwise, who would take care of us? It's a shame that many hospitals have such a terrible work environment, but the solution is that the hospitals need to improve, not that all the nurses need to quit.

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

I agree with you that in many places, esp today, it is tantamount to an abusive relationship! They keep cutting staff and increasing patient ratios with rising patient acuity while the nurses are just expected to work harder to keep this sinking ship of corporate healthcare going and profitable for those at the top!

I agree with you and wouldn't wish my children or friends or anyone frankly to endure what I've endured over the years because of the abusive working conditions. If only I had known of other options when I was younger, now I'm nearing the end of the road and that fills me with relief!

I feel for the new ones starting out, but know most have seen the writing on the wall and are using a short stint at bedside to pave a better life for themselves, either through other nursing options or advancing to NP. I wish them luck because I don't see things ever getting better, only worse!

The time of lifelong bedside nurses is nearing the end of its run. Sadly even the corporate yahoos are happy about this because all they care about is money in their pockets and their bonuses and want to replace the older, experienced nurses for new grads at the bottom of the wage scale.

I've heard my new boss actually had the nerve to tell the new grads she planned on getting rid of us and replacing us with newbies, this in the middle of a worldwide pandemic where nurses and other healthcare workers have gotten sick and even died no less! Where is the compassion!

For the newbies I'd be afraid to work here knowing what they have in store, only the blind leading the blind. They have no respect for experienced nurses, esp the vast knowledge, expertise and patient safety we bring with us. They would rather have all new grads that are inexperienced, but malleable; and management is willing to overlook the safety risks that imposes as long as it puts more Benjamins in their pockets!

Thankfully I will be walking away soon and starting early retirement to escape this, so hey its a win-win for me and my boss! But it is a lose-lose for the patients and the new grads!

Edited by brandy1017

OUxPhys, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 4 years experience.

I think it all depends on the system you worked for. My old job underpays everyone that works there including doctors. They consider it a privilege to work there and you should be grateful you even work there. My current job as a bedside I enjoy more. I enjoy the pt population more. I enjoy my paycheck more. Do some days suck? Absolutely. I am lucky to have good co-workers and a good manager/assistant manager. The acuity of the pt's is also lower than my previous job.

I have had my moments where I dabble at the idea of moving on from bedside. Some day I will but I won't move on just for the sake of moving on. It has to be for a position I know I will enjoy and not a position just to get out of bedside.

noyesno, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Medicine. Has 11 years experience.

I did 8.5 years in Med/Surg and it was horrible. I learned a lot and knew I wanted to be a NP so I kept at it despite the tachycardia from anxiety, sleepless nights before shifts, sleepless nights after shifts, no lunch breaks, physical demands, short staffing, hostile work environment, etc. Needless to say, it took a toll on my physical and mental health.

10 months ago, I started working as a NP and I do have to say all the time I spent in Med/Surg hell has benefited me in my current role. I'm good with patients. I know how to problem solve. I'm resourceful. I know a lot of doctors (helpful for referrals). I'm familiar with most treatments, procedures, diagnostic tests, and surgeries. I know how to deescalate angry patients.

Would I do it again? I'm not sure. It took a lot out of me. I should probably be in therapy. Wish there was an easier way to get to where I wanted to be. I would have taken it.

Edited by noyesno
Run on sentence

brandy1017, ASN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

1 hour ago, OUxPhys said:

I think it all depends on the system you worked for. My old job underpays everyone that works there including doctors. They consider it a privilege to work there and you should be grateful you even work there. My current job as a bedside I enjoy more. I enjoy the pt population more. I enjoy my paycheck more. Do some days suck? Absolutely. I am lucky to have good co-workers and a good manager/assistant manager. The acuity of the pt's is also lower than my previous job.

I have had my moments where I dabble at the idea of moving on from bedside. Some day I will but I won't move on just for the sake of moving on. It has to be for a position I know I will enjoy and not a position just to get out of bedside.

Yes things were infinitely better when we had good management. I had a wonderful boss for over 20 years, but he was let go. Also the best supervisor I ever had was let go. Basically all management and educators were shown the door when we were taken over by a hostile corporation. Even the doctors tell us and their patients how bad it is. Crazy! We lost so many nurses they need travelers in order to fill the gaps.

gettingbsn2msn, MSN, RN

Specializes in medical surgical. Has 5 years experience.

My son who graduated with a BSN 3 years ago is choosing to leave bedside. He told me it is unsustainable for him for the long term.

He worked in New York city during covid and I believe that did him in. They were short so he was doing 5 shifts per week. The good news is because he went to an inexpensive college and used the pay to pay off his student loans.

His brother is going in to engineering.

I also will add that 2 of the nurses in his group succumbed to covid. I think he is also depressed about their passing.

Edited by gettingbsn2msn
additional information.

CaffeinePOQ4HPRN, BSN, MSN, LPN, RN

Has 10 years experience.

2 minutes ago, gettingbsn2msn said:

My son who graduated with a BSN 3 years ago is choosing to leave bedside. He told me it is unsustainable for him for the long term.

He worked in New York city during covid and I believe that did him in. They were short so he was doing 5 shifts per week. The good news is because he went to an inexpensive college and used the pay to pay off his student loans.

His brother is going in to engineering.

I can't imagine what your son must have gone through on the COVID-19 frontlines in NYC. Your kids sound brilliant, btw!

Edited by CaffeinePOQ4HPRN

nursex23, BSN, RN

Has 3 years experience.

I left a year ago to work in a school. It's not the perfect job but it's 1000x better than working in a hospital, at least for me.

LibraNurse27, BSN, RN

Specializes in Community Health, Med/Surg, ICU Stepdown. Has 8 years experience.

On 8/20/2020 at 10:16 AM, CaffeinePOQ4HPRN said:

Or, perhaps some of us Nurses just have integrity, self-respect, and healthy self-esteem that we don't feel a need to tolerate being treated like garbage 😉

I'm sure it was not your intention but I feel a little insulted by this. I don't think bedside nurses don't have integrity, self-respect, or good self-esteem. Some people like bedside, some bedside jobs are not terrible, and others are stuck there because of lack of opportunities and financial needs.

My bedside job is hard, but I feel I have integrity for working for a public hospital, and it increases my self esteem to see critically ill pts get better and go home, and know I played a small part in it. I have respect for all types of nursing, and I don't think someone should be judged for staying at the bedside, just as no one should be judged for leaving it. Sorry if I sound defensive, just came off a hard shift... maybe that is proving your point! LOL