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CommunityRNBSN

CommunityRNBSN

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CommunityRNBSN's Latest Activity

  1. CommunityRNBSN

    New NP grad at 50 years old. Is the age an obstacle to be hired?

    I just had to chime in and say I’m 37 but I look older; several of my classmates were in their 50s, and all of us walked into the jobs we wanted out of RN school. I know that wasn’t your question— yours is about NP school— but when I read this commentor’s blanket statement about age discrimination being widespread, I had to comment. It is no doubt a problem in some places, but it is far from universal.
  2. CommunityRNBSN

    Coronavirus

    I have told my patients that if they don’t get a flu shot every year, they are not allowed to say anything about Coronavirus, including but not limited to how badly a vaccine for it is needed.
  3. CommunityRNBSN

    Parent Pick-Up of Sick Kiddo

    That school nurse’s behavior is inexcusable. It wouldn’t be acceptable under any circumstances of course— but particularly because they have never had this situation with the mom before. It’s not a case of a family who can NEVER be reached and NEVER has the correct phone numbers on file and always refuses to come pick up their kid. I am so sorry that happened; that poor mom. I never understand the comments that “people should have a backup” as though it’s a solution to everything. I do have backups. But they might go to a movie and turn their phone off; to a church service; hiking out of cell range; or just otherwise living their lives. I do not have anyone in my life who sits in their home, phone in hand, waiting for the once-every-five-years moment when my child needs to be picked up from school.
  4. CommunityRNBSN

    Critical Care Eliticism?

    If you were a lawyer, people would fill your ears about how unethical and greedy lawyers are. If you were a musician, people would say “Must be nice to just sleep late and play around at the piano all day” If you were a teacher, people would say you must not be very smart since “Those who can’t, teach.” If you were a psychiatrist, people would tell you that it’s barely even a real branch of medicine. You have to chose your career (and your next job) based on what you WANT to do, and not what people say or imply about it!
  5. I work outpatient so I know it’s not relevant. But one of my coworkers had gotten in the habit of working off the clock. (Our workload really is too much to accomplish in each shift, so she felt like her choices were either leave stuff undone or stay late, and we aren’t allowed to have overtime.). The manager found out and told her she had to go home on time. It eventually escalated until she was told that if she’s working off the clock, security will be called to take her out! They don’t want the liability of someone in there messing around with drugs and patient charts, but not officially being at work.
  6. CommunityRNBSN

    Threw out back, what’s next?

    I work in an FQHC. It’s all patient education and a lot of phone/paperwork. There is no lifting, and I can get up and walk, stretch, sit as needed. It seems ideal for someone with back issues.
  7. CommunityRNBSN

    Disrespect & Profanity

    I definitely do not call patients Mr or Ms. It has never occurred to me. I do avoid “sweetie” and that sort of thing. Although honestly, I’m from the south and I love being called by endearments like that. If a nurse is calling me “honey” it makes me feel like I’m going to be well taken care of. I recognize, however, that I am in the minority with that opinion! So I would never call a patient by an endearment. When I have patients from Africa, they sometimes call me “Sisi” or “Mama” and I usually reflect that back to them. I admit to being a little offended that I am more often called “mama” rather than “sisi” these days as that must mean I’m getting old.... I do think that in general, being respectful overall is more important than the specifics words I use. I’ve been treated very poorly by people who were impeccably polite!
  8. CommunityRNBSN

    Keep getting rejected

    I am trying to make a light-hearted silly comment so PLEASE don’t take this as me being mean. When I first read your post my thought was: “How can you be more competitive? Learn to use capital letters correctly!” But I don’t have any actual advice, I’m sorry, and good luck. You’ll get there, just keep your eye on the prize.
  9. CommunityRNBSN

    New Grad Losing Hope of Getting Job

    I did not job hunt before graduation. I was exactly one year ahead of you in terms of timing. I got my first interview in February and started work in March. That was after many rejections which honestly seemed like auto-rejections from hospital online application programs (I’m not sure a human ever looked at them).
  10. CommunityRNBSN

    how much lido do you all add to rocephin IM?

    We always do 0.9 mL (so it’s just replacing sterile water; same amount) Ha-ha “What the provider orders...”. (I’m being light-hearted, I don’t want it to sound harsh.). I work outpatient (FQHC) and I promise the doctors have no idea how to reconstitute it! Their responsibility ends at diagnosing gonorrhea and prescribing 250mg of ceftriaxone. Google and/or the pharmacist give instructions from there.
  11. CommunityRNBSN

    MA being called "nurse"

    It is so hard for patients to keep us all straight but the DOCTOR should certainly be able to!
  12. CommunityRNBSN

    Ruining My Career?

    If you don’t want to work in a hospital, why on earth would you need to gain experience working in a hospital?? I do a lot of diabetes education in my job at an FQHC. It’s incredibly important and needed. As evidence: My patient today was diagnosed with T2DM in 2016, has been under the care of a series of PCPs since that time, and did not know what “carbohydrate” meant. He said “Nobody ever talked to me about what I should eat.” They just give him Lantus and Metformin and call it a day. (And then they wonder why his A1C was 10.)
  13. CommunityRNBSN

    Breakdown at work

    In this temporary period when you don’t have any professional help, good self-help can be incredibly effective. Have you read “Help and Hope for Your Nerves” by Claire Weekes? It’s probably at your library. Or, if you’re not a reader, I highly recommend the free podcast “Not Another Anxiety Show”. Start from Episode 1. The host is a nurse and she was where you are now. She has amazing, grounded advice. There is hope for you. I promise. This season will not last forever.
  14. CommunityRNBSN

    Where do I go from here?

    This is most of what I do. I work in an FQHC. Almost no “skills” other than giving shots. Tons and tons of patient education. I build relationships with (some of) our patients and I have LONG visits with them. An option for the future is Certified Diabetes Educator (you have to get experience first and then there’s an exam).
  15. CommunityRNBSN

    What Is One’s Opinion If You See A Man Wearing a Dansko Shoes?

    Basically never have I noticed what a colleague is wearing on their feet. Who stares at shoes??
  16. CommunityRNBSN

    Career doom or new age of nursing?

    I just wanted to let you know: I graduated from a 1-year program in 2018. I have only kept in touch with about 5-6 of my classmates. Of them, TWO quit their hospital jobs (which were highly ranked residency programs at well regarded hospitals) before they were off orientation. Professors were horrified: “You’ll never get another job! What will this do to the reputation of our BSN!?” Both of them are so happy now, in their new jobs. One works in L&D at a different hospital, and loves it. One works with me, at a FQHC. It is not unusual to quit your first position (and really, an orientation is a testing ground, isn’t it? For you and the hospital to be sure it’s a good fit?) Hang in there, you’ll be fine!
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