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Bad neighborhood?

Nurses   (2,457 Views 13 Comments)
by netglow netglow (Member)

netglow works as a RN.

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I live about 45 to an hour away from a major metro area. Years ago, I had clients in and around the area, and as a new grad in my first career worked downtown in this city. Neighborhoods change, some were up and coming back then, but, I've lost touch with all that as I've been away for many years. So in checking out hospitals down there, where, I've got no idea of the danger level these days, and have absolutely no info on "what's what", I've got creative in checking out the neighborhood. Other than "street" blogs on crime that have started up, I just google these words:

was taken to (hospital name)

This I find, will bring up shootings, etc. all sorts of media worthy stuff. You know how it goes, closest hospital first. Then regardless of trauma level really, you will see the street names where the incident occurred... frequent shootings very close by in this particular case. I wondered why so many NG positions only at this one site, where just about everywhere around me is not really hiring. Are new grads used for target practice? :eek: just kidding... sort of.

I also wonder who here is working in gangsta land?!?! What do you do for your safety?

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I was sent to gangsta land to work home health night shift. The nursing supervisor could not go out at night when I worked because it was "not safe" for her. So, I sarcastically remarked, "Oh, it's ok for me to go there at night to work, but she can't come to supervise me for ten minutes?" I should do this little number you have suggested and give it to the employer. Ha, ha!

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ChristineN works as a RN.

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As someone that has worked at several inner city hospitals, some in not so nice neighborhoods, relax. Hospitals want to protect their employees. However, I often found that people tended to think neighborhoods were alot more dangerous than they actually are. I would still be careful, but I wouldn't carry your designer handbag, loads of cash, or 5 credit cards, especially if for whatever reason you are parking off hospital property. I would frankly be more concerned about how good the hospital than the neighborhood.

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pagandeva2000 works as a Licensed Practical Nurse.

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I also would try not to wear my nursing uniform if I had to take public transportation or if you have to walk too far from your car to the facility. Many of the 'gangsta' folks I know really believe that nurses make great money or carry drugs. Or, believe it or not, you can be approached to do strange things.

I work in a city hospital clinic that deals with Medicaid patients, and unfortunately, many of our patients are the type that come in wearing expensive clothing, which we can tell that they sell drugs, or just have dirty dealings in general. Once, while walking to the hospital lunchroom, a patient approached me and offered me money to get ahold of narcartic prescription pads. He wasn't that friendly when I told him, no, either, but, I gracefully pulled away, saying that all of them are numbered and would be immediately traced.

Another time, just when I was about to leave the facility, a person in a three pieced suit came to me and said that he had not been at work for close to a week, and that he needed a note with 'any hospital letterhead' saying that he was being treated there. Only medical records releases that sort of information, I told him. He says "Well, the issue is, I was never treated here, but if I go back to work tomorrow with no note, I will be suspended without pay". I told him that no licensed person would say that they treated someone who actually did not. Then, he asks me if there is another 'more cooperative nurse' around. The nerve of people, really.

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Fiona59 has 18 years experience.

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My hospital is considered "inner city" and in a "rough neighbourhood". Having said that I've never had a problem in a decade of being there. Other nurses report having issues.

But then some people manage to look approachable, refuse to pay for on site parking and prefer free parking in the area. You set yourself up.

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I live about 45 to an hour away from a major metro area. Years ago, I had clients in and around the area, and as a new grad in my first career worked downtown in this city. Neighborhoods change, some were up and coming back then, but, I've lost touch with all that as I've been away for many years. So in checking out hospitals down there, where, I've got no idea of the danger level these days, and have absolutely no info on "what's what", I've got creative in checking out the neighborhood. Other than "street" blogs on crime that have started up, I just google these words:

was taken to (hospital name)

This I find, will bring up shootings, etc. all sorts of media worthy stuff. You know how it goes, closest hospital first. Then regardless of trauma level really, you will see the street names where the incident occurred... frequent shootings very close by in this particular case. I wondered why so many NG positions only at this one site, where just about everywhere around me is not really hiring. Are new grads used for target practice? :eek: just kidding... sort of.

I also wonder who here is working in gangsta land?!?! What do you do for your safety?

I work home health and I have one patient that lives in the worse neighborhood in the city. This neighborhood has the highest number of crimes any given day. I never see police patrols there.To make it worse my patient lives on the dead end street so basically in the event of roberry I cant even escape in car unless I back off with m car.When I get there it is very quiet except the house next to my patient's house has a crates and locks around the doors and windows and there is a gang sign hanging on another house fence. I call it a dead silence heh. Not to mention I'm a fairly young skinny female not some 200 pound big guy,I'm an easy target.Well what I do is I try to go there before evening time (the latest would be 12-afternoon).I wouldnt go see my patient in the evening time.I always have my scrubs and stethoscope around my neck.When I'm driving in my car I usually dont look at people walking by.Once as I was driving I took a glance at a person walking by and this person who was a young male started starring at me with such hatred,hostility that made me terrified and guess what as I was driving away from his view he even turn his head following me with his eyes.I got this bad feeling about this person.I'm sure he would attempt to hurt me if I was walking instead of driving.Basically starring or observing people even from distance from you car can provoke violence,trouble,hostility. Just keep driving pretending you dont see anyone,ignore assults and other.Next,dont stop nowhere else except your destination.Dont use a gas station at the bad neigboorhood.Once you arrived at your destination,look around is it safe to get out,avoid parking by vans especially those without windowns.Someone can easily kidnap you and throw you in this van and then you cant even scream for help cause no one will see you...Next lock your purse in your trunk,you dont want to carry your wallet with you in a bad neighboorhood.Lastly,introduce yourself to the people living on the street,tell them you are a nurse and you came to help,they will leave you alone and often look out after you.

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16,172 Visitors; 1,216 Posts

I also would try not to wear my nursing uniform if I had to take public transportation or if you have to walk too far from your car to the facility. Many of the 'gangsta' folks I know really believe that nurses make great money or carry drugs. Or, believe it or not, you can be approached to do strange things.

I work in a city hospital clinic that deals with Medicaid patients, and unfortunately, many of our patients are the type that come in wearing expensive clothing, which we can tell that they sell drugs, or just have dirty dealings in general. Once, while walking to the hospital lunchroom, a patient approached me and offered me money to get ahold of narcartic prescription pads. He wasn't that friendly when I told him, no, either, but, I gracefully pulled away, saying that all of them are numbered and would be immediately traced.

Another time, just when I was about to leave the facility, a person in a three pieced suit came to me and said that he had not been at work for close to a week, and that he needed a note with 'any hospital letterhead' saying that he was being treated there. Only medical records releases that sort of information, I told him. He says "Well, the issue is, I was never treated here, but if I go back to work tomorrow with no note, I will be suspended without pay". I told him that no licensed person would say that they treated someone who actually did not. Then, he asks me if there is another 'more cooperative nurse' around. The nerve of people, really.

Totally not true.Nursing uniform can actually save your behind while working in a bad neighboorhood.Take it from someone who was face to face with bunch of drug dealers and trouble makers.If I wouldnt be wearing my uniform right now God knows what would have happend as they were very hostile toward my person.

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I work in the inner city in a pretty rough area but they are fairly good about making sure we are protected and there is always plenty of employees walking around the block where it is located so I feel safe. The good news is that the experiences there are incredible and imo you will see much more diversity and interesting things than a smaller community hospital.

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netglow works as a RN.

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I guess. Lots of drive-bys surrounding this place.. a few blocks to the interstate, just gotta make it... LOL!

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DCtraumarn has 9 years experience and works as a Nursing Director- Critical Care.

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My hospital is also inner city and I have never had an issue. I took the metro for years, but now I drive. We get our fair share of the gun and knife club trauma's, the array of homeless (undomiciled) but the biggest threat may be the rampant HIV. Be on your guard for needlestick injuries.

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happy2learn works as a Employed at a Level 1 Trauma Center.

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I volunteer at a hospital in a "bad neighborhood." I just keep my windows rolled up when I leave the hospital garage, and keep the music down low. As long as you don't go walking around the hospital, you should be fine. And don't stare at anyone. I just look ahead.

I feel pretty safe there. But I can't say I feel that safe outside the block. The entire block is a few different hospitals, once you get outside the hospital network, you're in a high crime zone.

Although, some of the criminals do come into the ED looking for the person they assaulted to finish the job. They are actually nice. They want to get back there and they know they won't get far if they cause a scene. Of course, they never get back because all assault victims have a special code on them. We send them to an office, where security follows, lol.

Oh, and we have a metal detector.

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Totally not true.Nursing uniform can actually save your behind while working in a bad neighboorhood.Take it from someone who was face to face with bunch of drug dealers and trouble makers.If I wouldnt be wearing my uniform right now God knows what would have happend as they were very hostile toward my person.

I don't know that this is true in all neighborhoods. In some areas, I think that this identifies you as someone who may be carrying medications, including narcotics. I have done home health assignments in high crime areas, and my coordinators have always been quick to point out that I should carry small bags and not wear medical uniforms. They, or my patient families, also let me know what colors signified gangs in the area, so that I didn't wear those colors because I took public transportation to those assignments.

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