are private school more lenient on their admission requirements? | allnurses

are private school more lenient on their admission requirements?

  1. 0 are private school more lenient on their admission requirements?
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  2. 20 Comments

  3. Visit  DadStudentPerhaps profile page
    #1 0
    I've heard that some are a little more lenient.
  4. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    #2 0
    I think this depends upon the school and perhaps, individual circumstances. It would be hard to believe that Suzy Q wouldn't get leeway if her father made a substantial gift to the school some time prior to her deciding to apply there. That scenario is quite possible even at public schools.
  5. Visit  BuckyBadgerRN profile page
    #3 0
    As far as?....
  6. Visit  Esme12 profile page
    #4 0
    Yes...some are.
  7. Visit  morte profile page
    #5 1
    not always a good thing, if you/your academics are poor, why would you put yourself in this position of spending money for nothing? also, they are contributing to the glut of nurses.
  8. Visit  elkpark profile page
    #6 2
    The term "private school" can mean a lot of things. Are you talking about traditional private but non-profit schools? Some are more competitive and restrictive than many public schools. If you're talking about the proprietary (private-for-profit) "schools," AFAIK, most of them will take anyone with a pulse and the ability to qualify for student loans.
    Last edit by elkpark on Dec 26, '13
  9. Visit  INN_777 profile page
    #7 0
    From my research specifically on ABSN programs, state university programs are more competitive because they are usually half, if not a third, of the cost of a private school program. Only makes sense.
  10. Visit  203bravo profile page
    #8 3
    Quote from elkpark
    The term "private school" can mean a lot of things. Are you talking about traditional private but non-profit schools? Some are more competitive and restrictive than many public schools. If you're talking about the proprietary (private-for-profit) "schools," AFAIK, most of them will take anyone with a pulse and the ability to qualify for student loans.
    This is exactly correct --- how lax is Yale, Princeton, or Harvard .. they are all private schools..

    But the likes of DeVry and Capella do accept and aggressively sell (er recruit) anyone that show any ability to come up with the tuition -- beware if tuition is more at the college in a strip mall than at Harvard.

    That being said, there are some good programs in some of these colleges so one should weigh all choices carefully.. Always research and talk to current and former students.. make sure any credits taken can be transferred to any other college (Uni) in the state.. Check with local nursing board to verify NCLEX pass rates..
  11. Visit  nekozuki profile page
    #9 0
    For-profit schools are more lenient. And by lenient, I mean, if you have a pulse, you'll likely get in. Although, the ease of admission is offset by 60k in loans.
  12. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    #10 0
    Quote from nekozuki
    For-profit schools are more lenient. And by lenient, I mean, if you have a pulse, you'll likely get in. Although, the ease of admission is offset by 60k in loans.
    There's a private-for-profit BSN program in southern California that charges $132,000 in tuition for a traditional BSN program. The desperation of some people to obtain a nursing degree amazes me at times.
  13. Visit  BoxingRN profile page
    #11 0
    If you can secure the loan you are good to go. It's quite sad to be honest.
  14. Visit  nekozuki profile page
    #12 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    There's a private-for-profit BSN program in southern California that charges $132,000 in tuition for a traditional BSN program. The desperation of some people to obtain a nursing degree amazes me at times.
    The business model is genius, and I can see why so many people fall into that trap despite the crushing debt and permanence of student loans.

    Instant gratification + no upfront payment = willing participants.

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