Jump to content

nekozuki LPN

Pediatrics
Member Member Nurse
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 356

    Content

  • 1

    Articles

  • 15,982

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

nekozuki has 5 years experience as a LPN and specializes in Pediatrics.

nekozuki's Latest Activity

  1. nekozuki

    Racial Discrimination In The Nursing Profession

    A prime example of how racism plays out at my job: I'm biracial, but with my light skin and dye job, I am perceived as a white woman. I am treated differently at my job in subtle ways -- I am seen as more approachable and less aggressive. I am the first one to whom OT is offered, more likely to be given cash incentives, and when I cop an attitude, I am never called aggressive or accused of having an attitude problem. I'm perceived as "easier to deal with" and reap the benefits. All of administration, the board of directors, everyone in upper management are white, despite the majority of the nursing staff being black employees who've been with the company for 20-30 years. We promote from within. No one has put in the work to train up, empower and elevate a woman of color. Friends promote friends, and when the people at the top are white, it becomes a self-perpetuating thing. Management/owners are not overtly racist. They believe equality is important. But they do not have self-awareness of how their bias plays out. If black women disagree, they are labeled aggressive. When they talk with their close circle of friends during report, the cadence/speech changes to reflect who they are versus the professional code-switch they must use in front of patients/coworkers to sound "white" and thus, "appropriate." They are then called clique-ish for this, when really they are finding solidarity with one another. They are more regularly reprimanded and cited for behaviors that the rest of us exhibit, because there is a spotlight on "ghetto" attitude. The worse thing is black women are called aggressive, but when there are patients whose families are obnoxious/troublesome, management says "hey, let's put them with [black nurse] because she'll keep them in line and scare them into acting right! They'll get intimidated and leave us alone!" Racism is constantly labeling black women as aggressive to deny them professional respect, accolades and rewards, then weaponizing them in order to do your dirty work. It's not fair, it's not right, and this is why we need to work harder to educate ourselves and elevate people of color to positions of leadership.
  2. nekozuki

    Valencia college fall 2018

    We received the email last week! On Tuesday, six weeks exactly from the due date.
  3. nekozuki

    Valencia college fall 2018

    Nothing yet! Myself and two coworkers also applied, none of us have gotten anything.
  4. nekozuki

    RN's and LPN's working as Nursing Assistants?

    CNA duties *are* nursing duties. There is no separation between the two. For the sake of efficiency, nursing tasks that are safe for a layman to do can be delegated under supervision, but there is ZERO distinction. It's always weird to me when nurses think that wiping butts is beneath them or can hardly change a diaper. How do you do skin head to toe skin assessments without being able to roll, move, undress, and ambulate a patient? All my patients are total care and too fragile to be handled by anyone but a nurse, so we don't use CNAs here. Our ratio is never more than 1:3, so that helps. But it's always hard to precept/orient new hires who came from places with a lot of CNA support, because I know they're going to struggle. It's not easy giving a bedbath and putting a diaper on a 150lb PVS patient who neurostorms every time you touch them, while keeping the ventilator tubing, central line, JT/GT, subrapubic catheter and multiple monitors/wires from screeching. The joke in our facility is "How do you tell the difference between an LPN and a BSN?" "If the diaper is on sideways, the nurse has a BSN."** **I love you, BSN nurses, don't come at me with the fury of a thousand suns
  5. nekozuki

    is this bullying?

    Throw a small group of people together in an extremely stressful, high-pressure and competitive situation, and this sort of thing can happen. Benign quirks and personality differences get blown out of proportion, little annoyances become intolerable, and people find reasons to pick at one another. By the end of nursing school, our class was down to only 8 people and separated into two cliques that loathed one another. Three days after graduation literally everything was forgotten and no one cared. As time passes, none of this stuff will seem important anymore. Take this as a lesson. Ask yourself what parts of your personality might come ass as abrasive or off-putting. Be grateful for the learning experience and ability to work on how you interact/engage with others before entering the workforce. You'll be fine.
  6. nekozuki

    Lpn to RN fast track

    If you want to avoid hoop-jumping and want easy exams to pass, just go to one of those 50,000 dollar for-profit degree mills that do clinical rotations in some terrible LTC one violation away from being shut down. Standards protect us. Standards ensure that you have a basic foundation and can meet minimum criteria. Ten years with an LPN license doesn't guarantee that you can pass the RN Nclex. That being said, it seems so cruel to be one point away and be told to re-take everything. What a nightmare.
  7. nekozuki

    I hate the politics in nursing

    Honestly, pretty much every field sucks. Retail sucks. Hospitality sucks. Some of my friends are engineers, and sometimes it sucks. Education sucks. In just about every job, you have to get up at the same time every day and do things you might not want to, or not be able to pay your bills. Work is a microcosm of society, in that a bunch of people trying to make their rent plod through their day, and have typical interpersonal conflict and deal with environmental stressors. It's not a nursing thing. It's a human thing. Take comfort in the fact that it's awful everywhere
  8. nekozuki

    Bizarre Med Order

    Honestly, q4h albuterol is normal in our facilities (different medical daycares and groups homes with patients of various ages and conditions, some ventilator dependent, some that are highly functional and eat/breathe on their own). For a few of my patients with significant reflux/vomiting, they were kept on that regiment for years. Pulmonology wanted it that way due to chronic issues + potential aspiration/overlap issues from reflux + being fragile while around other kids. Possibly excessive, but definitely not unheard of. Bless school nurses. You all are such a catch-all for everything under the sun.
  9. nekozuki

    Pro Life Beliefs and Nursing

    I'm a queer nurse that must provide care to homophobes and people that think that simply existing in a queer body is bringing about the apocalypse (and tell me to my face). But that doesn't really matter. Nursing isn't about me being a champion of my personal values. It is about fulfilling the duties and obligations my job requires of me, and that's that. So I do my job. If you can't, find a job that constructs itself around your social/religious narratives.
  10. nekozuki

    Valencia college fall 2018

    I applied for the fall 2018 LPN to RN/accelerated track as well! 4.0 pre-reqs, 3.96 overall GPA, 91 on the TEAS, so I'm not worried about getting in, more worried I missed something on the application or that east campus never passed it along.
  11. nekozuki

    Can nurses live a luxurious life?

    Income-wise, I'm considered upper middle class for my region, but I also have no student loan debt, no children, and I keep my credit card balance at a few hundred bucks. But I also have to work 60 hours a week, constantly negotiate for higher pay through agencies, and field multiple calls a day. I work per diem in an area with a severe nursing shortage (and a relatively low cost of living), so some of my friends break 100k. But it's hustle, juggling agencies, inconsistent, and sometimes not worth it.
  12. nekozuki

    Locker Room Talk

    You're not invisible. You're the one I call when I can't figure something out or need a second opinion. You're the one who shows me that colostomy bags have a surprisingly broad number of unconventional uses. You're the one who shows me how to jiggle the bedrail juuuuuuuuuuust right to get to it slide down. You're the one that threw a young, rude surgeon out of the unit for being nasty to me, to which I whispered "holy f***! Nurses can do that?!" You're the one that showed me how to handle creepy male patients who make inappropriate comments. You're the one who reminded me that the my sweet, frail dementia patient needs to be kept out of suckerpunch range You're the one who caught me before I made a stupid mistake and counseled me instead of just complaining to a manager about me. You're the one who tolerates me watching terrible reality TV in the breakroom. You're the one who walks calmly into the room, pats my hand, tells me to calm down and use my clinical skills when I'm frazzled over a patient desatting You're the one who acts guilty and ashamed when you bring your laptop to work so I can fix it (seriously, it's fine, I owe you 3523892 favors) You're the one who always seem surprised when I thank you. You're not invisible. Sometimes you just being present in the same space creates an environment where I feel supported enough to do things on my own. I mean, a lighthouse may not feel as though it interacts with all these ships passing in the night, but they are so much more important than they realize.
  13. nekozuki

    My Body Is Not My Resume: Exploring Nursing Dress Codes

    I work in a series of pediatric group homes with six patients staffed by two nurses. Most of the kids are on hospice or PVS, nearly all of them wards of the state with little parental involvement. It's a pretty sad atmosphere where you're just caring for kids the state is waiting to die so they can upgrade abuse charges against the parents for murder. They try to make it as relaxed and low-stress as possible, and honestly, the *only* dress code rule is pretty much to be clean. Crazy tats and funky hair are totally acceptable. People come in with pajamas on, bizarre footwear, street clothes, last week during the cold snap I relieved a nurse wearing a tank top, sweatpants, and full lace-up Ugg boots. My company isn't perfect, but I appreciate that they roll with the punches in terms of redefining what "professional" means. The times are changing, and tats/hairdye/piercings will no longer be the ruler by which we measure professionalism.
  14. nekozuki

    LPNs and central lines

    Trying to answer a question for another nurse and I'm not entirely sure, as the BON guidelines so often cannot cover guidelines for every situation. She works in a facility where there are often only LPNs on duty. She has no IV certification. Her patient has a central line and TPN, which she cannot touch except to turn on and off. An RN comes in once per shift to set everything and is available by phone on call 24/7 (but not on site). This is a total care infant who constantly attempts to pull the central line (plus her J-tube) out. In my opinion, it is a bad idea to assume care for this patient. However, I could not answer as to whether it is illegal in the state of Florida or against the scope of practice. Generally, it seems like this *might* be okay if under the supervision of an RN, but on call via phone doesn't seem the same as being on site. Anyone have any thoughts? She is concerned, as we nurses so often are, that refusing the assignment will result in consequences and rolled eyes from the scheduling office as well as nurse administrators who aren't afraid of risky practice like this. Frankly, I find it disturbing enough she received zero training or education on central lines/TPN.
  15. nekozuki

    Weird/ Dumb Nursing School Rules

    Underwear color. We were forced to wear all-white scrubs with white underwear to prevent colors/patterns on our butts from showing through. Then, a new clinical instructor later docked us all points for not wearing nude-colored underwear, because the visible panty-lines of our mandatory white underwear was too "deliberately provocative" for the hospital setting...y'know, when we were just following the program rules
  16. nekozuki

    Not Enough Backup-CPS?

    Thank you so much, SnowyJ. There are so many children whose abuse and exploitation could have and should have been detected, reported, and stopped at the school level, and I'm so grateful you're refusing to play a role in that brand of neglect/inattentiveness.