2year RN vs BSN

  1. 0
    Hello I wasn't sure where to post this but this is a quick question from a prospective nursing student to a 2 year college, I've been hearing that more hospitals are angling for 4 year degrees as they try to become "magnets" is it fruitless to go after the 2year RN and what really is the difference and can I work with then pause after the 2yrs RN and then go back for BSN? Just curious with all this shifting in the market place.
  2. 14 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Yes, magnet hospitals must hire a certain amount of BSN vs ADN to attain/keep that status. However, I wouldn't say that it is fruitless to go for the ADN. It is important to look at jobs in your area. New grads are having a tough time. If your area isn't affected, I would recommend that route. Often, the hospital will pay for your RN to BSN schooling too.

    The difference between BSN and ADN is that BSN students have management, policy, liberal classes, etc on top of regular nursing courses. If you go into a BSN program, you cannot pause and go back. You get your RN at the end of the four year program.
  4. 0
    Ah thanks for this, well I want to do the RN pause, maybe get paid to take the BSN and move on so by the time the whole turn-over happens hopefully I would have the BSN oh boy what a road I'm taking Thanks for the clear up though, just getting nervous. I've already got a BA but in Radio/TV and can't do the fast track program due to the job constraints and the GPA is literally .01 point off
  5. 0
    You can go back for a BSN, but you might save time, money, and aggravation by getting your nursing degree from a BSN program to begin with.
  6. 0
    I know the very large hospital near my parent's home is now *only* hiring BSN nurses. Any nurse with a 2-year degree may stay, only if they get their BSN within a certain number of years (2 or 3 I think?). I believe the hospital will pay for it.

    I would certainly go for the BSN. If you only get into 2-year programs or it is only what you can do financially I would suggest getting your RN to BSN online or via a traditional university. Its what I plan on doing anyway. The job market is so competitive, I'd like any edge I can get.
  7. 0
    For my situation it is faster for me to get my ASN and then do the transition to BSN program. It would take me longer to get my AA and then to start a traditional BSN route...but I am not a traditional student straight out of highschool nor am I an older student who already has another degree so look into it...here once I get my Associates which will be two years they will give me 30 credits towards my bachelors degree so it will only take me one more year for the BSN. And since I will already be a RN I will have the option of working while I finish my BSN.
  8. 0
    There are hospitals here, in NE Florida, that will only hire BSN. After taking all of my re-reqs, it will take me just as much time to get an ASN as it will a BSN. I have applied to both but if I don't get into the BSN after two application tries then I will get ASN and then go back for one year to get the RN to BSN bridge. It will take an extra year but it will be worth it.....even at my age (42).
  9. 0
    Quote from tokyoROSE
    Yes, magnet hospitals must hire a certain amount of BSN vs ADN to attain/keep that status. However, I wouldn't say that it is fruitless to go for the ADN. It is important to look at jobs in your area. New grads are having a tough time. If your area isn't affected, I would recommend that route. Often, the hospital will pay for your RN to BSN schooling too.

    The difference between BSN and ADN is that BSN students have management, policy, liberal classes, etc on top of regular nursing courses. If you go into a BSN program, you cannot pause and go back. You get your RN at the end of the four year program.
    I agree with tokyoROSE, getting your BSN now is the very best option if you EVER plan on going on with schooling to obtain an advanced-practice degree (NP, CRNA, etc.). Many hospitals (mostly magnet) now require nurses with their ADNs to go back to school to get their BSN so you are best off to get it in the first place.
  10. 0
    If you can go for the BSN, do it. You will not regret it.

    While you could attend a 2-year school to get your ADN, you will likely have a harder time finding a job. In my town, 1/4 of the ADN graduating class from 2010 is still looking for jobs. Very few of the 2011 students have jobs. The this is the same at community colleges across the state, and it it likely that the community colleges will be reducing nursing enrollments next year because of the budget cuts and the difficulty in ADN graduates to get jobs. One dean I spoke with was expecting to enroll 1/3 fewer students in 2012 than they did in 2010.

    Another thing to consider is that many employers in my area are decreasing their tuition benefits to employees. One local hospital reduced their annual benefits from $2000/year to $600/year. Another only provides the tuition for the cheapest instate school (212/credit) regardless of the cost of the program.
  11. 0
    Check around in your area. It's different everywhere. In my area we have two schools: the CC and the University. The hospitals here will hire an ADN RN from the CC over the BSN RN from the University because our CC trains better nurses - higher nclex pass rate, better clinical skills, etc. But that is how it is where I am. It all depends on where you live. I even saw a job opening here the other day for a nurse mgt position and ADN was the required education level. Just remember it's different everywhere!


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and Create Job Alerts, Manage Your Resume, and Apply for Jobs.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top