You Know You’re A *Pediatric* Nurse When… - page 2

by slbull07

41,118 Visits | 49 Comments

For the past five years, I have had the opportunity to have a profession in Pediatric Nursing. People often say, “How can you work with sick little kids?” in response to me telling them I work in the Pediatric and Pediatric ICU... Read More


  1. 3
    I think the one thing I NEVER wanted to be when I started Nursing School was a Peds Nurse, and then it happened and here I am, a Pediatric Nurse.

    I even have decided to become a Foster/Adoptive Parent of a chronic Peds case, and the population has stolen my heart. I have made it my priority to provide them with competent and compassionate care even if it means watching a TON of Sponge Bob, Little Mermaid or whatever the latest obsession is.
    caddywompus, Daisy_08, and Kidrn911 like this.
  2. 1
    I'm so glad there is someone like you (and hopefully a lot like you) working with children! I *could* do it, but I would be horrible at it. I'm terrible at playing, being "silly" or consoling kids that aren't mine. Kids deserve to have a nurse who loves pediatrics and I can tell you're one of them!

    I hope you never lose your passion! Also, never forget how important those stickers are! I've had nurses seem annoyed when my own children asked to have a sticker at the end of a doctor's appointment....those are the nurses who don't belong there! It's so funny how important one sticker is to a kid after getting a shot or a procedure...especially when the nurse gives it to them for doing a "good job" (even if they were horrible).
    not.done.yet likes this.
  3. 0
    Having Phenergan Coughed back into my face and burning like Pepper Spray- yet having to act calm and smile wiping it away heading for sink- that's a fond memory, and a cute little booger too!

    Yes, it helps to have the Spongebob and Dora Stickers! But, I have to say I was much more shocked by the maturity of the terminal and critical kids I worked with. The few that make my nerves bath in adrenaline are the minority(however I can't think of a scarier place to be for a child than an ER or any other part of the Hospital. Love my Pediatric Wards, just don't get to go there as much anymore since the Pediatric ER went away to a now General ED. Now mainly in the Clinic- but I would have to say 90% of the stress is not the kids- but that's another thread
  4. 0
    nicely written
  5. 0
    i remember a peds nurse helping my parents and i brainstorm "code words" to use for catheters after my vesicostomy/urinary diversion in first grade. she came up with "straws" and somehow weasled my parents into getting me my first purse (pink tie-dyed jean material with glitter and flowers....w/e it was '94 and fashion was odd) b/c i "surely needed something to hold them in while at school". she gave me a wink as if to say, don't worry kid, i'll help you get that purse!!
  6. 0
    I've never done any pediatric nursing, so this was great to read. Thanks for writing it up
  7. 0
    "When you believe in magic and miracles...."

    I have recently decided I want to go back to school to become a pediatric nurse and this post reminds me why I am dropping everything in my life to pursue that goal. Thank you for your passion and insight into the profession.
  8. 0
    I can't wait to be a peds nurse!! Thank you for posting this!!!
  9. 0
    Just beautiful!!made me smile and my heart swell.... and im terrible with kids
  10. 5
    Quote from babyRN.
    This is really sweet. I always thought I might like PICU in nursing school and ended up in NICU as my one true love. However, I was excited when I first got to float to PICU initially and then knew that I could never do it.

    I'm curious: How do you deal with the fact that most of the PICU patients are fresh traumas, chronics (comatose) that live there until they're 21 and go to an adult facility, or their parents abuse them?

    I realize that some of our ex-preemies graduate to the PICU, but the majority of them turn out just fine. I just don't know how you guys do it!
    Actually, *most* PICU patients are small children with respiratory issues who recover fairly quickly and go home. Many of our chronics are actually very interactive and have families that love them to pieces. And those fresh traumas come back to visit us months later walking, talking and ready to go back to school. Our cardiacs may have been so sick the ECMO fairy flitted around their beds for days, but most of them do well in the end.


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