How To Answer The Most Common Nursing Interview Questions - page 2

To be perfectly blunt, interviews can be rather nerve-wracking because a lot is at stake. After all, you really want to be considered for this available position, and you only have one chance to make... Read More

  1. Visit  EmTheNewRN profile page
    3
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    I can NEVER think of anything to say when it comes to naming my weaknesses. It's not that I think I don't have any, I definitely do, but everything I think of I'm afraid to say because I'm afraid they won't hire me based on that! I HATE, HATE, HATE that question! Anyone have any suggestions?
    I care about each patient as a person, which is a valuable trait in nursing; however, it is important not to be consumed by it. I am working on learning to maintain a healthy work-life balance because "taking them home with me" doesn't help anyone. That is an honest statement from me, and my hope is that it reflects positively because empathy/caring is a positive trait in general, but it's important not to let it interfere with your clinical judgement or your own sanity. If there is something about you that is good as a person but can become a weakness as a professional, I think that's a good place to start.*

    *I'm relatively inexperienced so if the pros have a different opinion I'd love to hear it!
    tricia74832, KLW96, and theleaf like this.
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  3. Visit  BrandonLPN profile page
    1
    Quote from CrazierThanYou
    I can NEVER think of anything to say when it comes to naming my weaknesses. It's not that I think I don't have any, I definitely do, but everything I think of I'm afraid to say because I'm afraid they won't hire me based on that! I HATE, HATE, HATE that question! Anyone have any suggestions? Also, what exactly should we know about the facility? I mean, I can get on their website and see how many beds they have, etc. What do I need to talk about in an interview? This
    baffles me.
    WHATEVER you do, don't say something like "I'm a workaholic." or "I'm too much of a perfectionist."

    We do "team interviews" where I work, and I've sat in on a few where the interviewee said something like this. I always want to roll up a magazine and bop them on the head.
    i<3u likes this.
  4. Visit  EMTtoRNinVA profile page
    1
    My company utilizes Targeted Selection and so you won't be asked any of the traditional or "easy" interview questions during your interview. The goal is to determine "best fit" through past performance.
    kylee_adns likes this.
  5. Visit  adventure780 profile page
    0
    this is very helpful, definately looking at this before my next interview
  6. Visit  nurse2033 profile page
    2
    Quote from NayRN
    My interviews have been nothing like this. I was prepared for these questions. I'd done my research. I'd had deep thoughts on the mission, vision, and values of the company. The questions I was asked include:
    1. Identify a time when you were distressed by your ability to provide care for a patient within the constraints of the health care system and maintained a relationship with the patient afterwards. What happened? What is the patient doing now?
    This one threw me. I told of a time when I had a patient who was uninsured and not a citizen, and they were given emergency care and were stabilized in the hospital, but the docs were unwilling to provide the $25,000 surgery to fix their broken bone. I discharged them that way. I understood the business logistics of the situation, but as a nurse, it stunk to watch that patient walking out of the hospital still broken. No I did not maintain a relationship with the patient because I draw professional boundaries in my care and do not become personally involved with patients as a general rule.

    2. Identify a time when you had a problem with a coworker. What happened, and how did it turn out.
    I told about a time when I was a new nurse, and the charge nurse took my statement of "I have no idea if I can take a new patient right now, we need to ask my preceptor" wrong-I think she thought I was challenging her authority, or maybe my tone was just wrong. Anyway, after she walked off in a huff, I chased her down the hallway and apologized for my statement coming out wrong. 3 years later, she was one of the nurses who gave me a personal reference for this new job. Happy ending.

    3. Tell of a time you failed at something. What was it, and how did it turn out.
    I discussed a med error I had made. It was minor, and resulted in no harm, but an error all the same. I considered it a failure of many things including a stressful work environment and simple human nature. I related how it made me much more vigilant when checking medications, and how I consider it a success if I don't make the same or similar error again. I discussed how I have a hard time with the definition of failure because in my eyes the only "failure" is giving up. As long as something is learned from a mistake, it can never be considered a complete failure.

    There were several more questions, very open ended, but tailored to very specific circumstances. I felt good about it afterwards. I paid a lot of attention to my appearance and body language. It was a difficult interview, and I didn't get the job. The interviewer told me she would let me know either way by the end of the week. This was several weeks ago, and I never heard anything. I'm not sure what to think. Anyone else had an interview like this?
    I have had many similar questions. I would never admit to med error though, this could be the single reason you didn't get the job. I know, we are supposed to report, and management is supposed to give us an award for feeling safe and being honest. I'm not saying don't report med errors, but it is not something I would bring up in an interview.
    tricia74832 and CrazyGoonRN like this.
  7. Visit  nurse2033 profile page
    2
    Quote from deni_an
    I've thought about the "What are your weaknesses" question a lot.

    My weakness is I can't stand people who don't vaccinate their children, with their ignorance they are literally hurting society (herd immunity) and therefore hurting me or my future children.

    But I realize that is their freedom, and just because I don't respect you or your decisions doesn't mean I won't treat you with respect. I'll give you (and your children) the same care that I would give any other patient. But I won't be happy about it. :/

    I'll have to figure out a way to portray that in an interview. I think it is a valid answer though, at some point we'll all have to treat child molesters, murderers, drug users, or simply just rude people - our level of care cannot change when if we don't like someone. Luckily we don't have to be their friend we just have to help them get well.
    I would say you are passionate about being an advocate for immunization. "Can't stand" a paying customer is not a strong quality to show in an interview.
    theleaf and sublimeaurora like this.
  8. Visit  nurse2033 profile page
    0
    Good post!
  9. Visit  Volleyvolley profile page
    1
    Quote from nurse2033
    I would say you are passionate about being an advocate for immunization.
    Yes this is much better! Good call
    JulieL likes this.
  10. Visit  ~miss_mercy_me profile page
    1
    Food for thought... lots to think about... THANKS!
    TheCommuter likes this.
  11. Visit  Workitout profile page
    1
    In regards to discussing a med error at an interview- I personally don't think it is terrible so long as you can say you learned from it. There are very few nurses who haven't made a med error in their career. I wouldn't look at a med error as deal-breaker, and would appreciate the person's honesty. Especially when they can tell me that the error made them a better, more concientious nurse in the end. I agree with the poster who said a mistake is only a TOTAL mistake if you learn nothing from it.

    Med errors are bad because most are preventable and a serious one has the potential to cause great harm- so we are scared of discussing them and being labeled a 'bad' nurse, even though in reality, most of us have made at least one at some point. We are all human, we all make mistakes. Interviewers know this just as we do. I think our best hope would be that when we do make a mistake, there are no serious consequences and we learn from it.
    theleaf likes this.
  12. Visit  whitebunny profile page
    0
    i dont lie about med errors. i made few med errors(small) when i was casual, and when i became full time i became one of the RN with the best practice(least incident report) on the floor. Because i learn from my error and i figure out a way to establish the best practice for myself. i admit med error during interview and stating i learn from it, and i believe all interviewers expecting you being honest. they know me young,novice and they want to see that i can grow and i can learn from mistakes during interview.
  13. Visit  Rockstar Nurse profile page
    0
    Your answers were completely honest and clear. But I couldn't completely judge it If I haven't heard the total flow the interview.
  14. Visit  whatdoIdonow? profile page
    5
    Quote from deni_an
    I've thought about the "What are your weaknesses" question a lot.

    My weakness is I can't stand people who don't vaccinate their children, with their ignorance they are literally hurting society (herd immunity) and therefore hurting me or my future children.

    But I realize that is their freedom, and just because I don't respect you or your decisions doesn't mean I won't treat you with respect. I'll give you (and your children) the same care that I would give any other patient. But I won't be happy about it. :/

    I'll have to figure out a way to portray that in an interview. I think it is a valid answer though, at some point we'll all have to treat child molesters, murderers, drug users, or simply just rude people - our level of care cannot change when if we don't like someone. Luckily we don't have to be their friend we just have to help them get well.

    Wow! It's beyond funny to me to be lumped in with 'child molesters, murderers, drug users or simply rude people' because my children aren't vaccinated. Also beyond funny to me that you don't appear to have any kids of your own at this time to even understand the many reasons a parent makes the decisions they do for the welfare of their children- such as whether vaccination is appropriate or not. How naive you are! And, judgemental! Dig alittle deeper for some compassion toward impartial patient care cause I'm not buying it!
    Greenkji, Anniehow, monkeybug, and 2 others like this.


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