Are you a nurse with "alternative" spiritual beliefs? - pg.6 | allnurses

Are you a nurse with "alternative" spiritual beliefs? - page 6

If so, have you gotten grief from coworkers or patients because of it? Tell your stories here!!I'm pagan, and I'm pretty low key about it. I have nothing against Jesus. If he existed, I think he must... Read More

  1. Visit  Indy profile page
    4
    I'm a heathen, and what I mean by that is that I don't belong to a religious group, and I refuse to be accepted into one. I don't trust large groups of people at all, and I prefer to be what I am, and let my actions speak for themselves. I very much enjoy being part of a profession that washes feet and cares for all people in their time of need, and if people need to label that then they can, but I do not belong to those people.
  2. Visit  bigsick_littlesick profile page
    1
    I'm an atheist. I try not to talk about it at work but the subject has come up in breakrooms and whatnot. I'll be honest and my co-workers are pretty nonchalant about it which is awesome. I think I get more flack from my own family more than I do at work. I might keep it a secret from prospective employers as I think they subconsciously take that into account even though they're not supposed to. As far as patients, I've been asked things like if I believe or not or which church I go to... I think I do a pretty good job at redirecting it back to them and it usually works.

    I have never been asked to pray at bedside and I hope I never have to. I used to be Christian and I was always so horrible at praying in front of other people. Made me really nervous, I don't think even if I tried to, I would be any good at it. I dunno... I would probably call a chaplain in at that point. I try to live my life honestly and I would feel rotten pretending to pray for someone if I wasn't of their faith. Likewise, if I was a patient and I knew my nurse was faking it just because, I probably wouldn't be too happy about it.
    somenurse likes this.
  3. Visit  DeLanaHarvickWannabe profile page
    2
    I'm a Christian but my patients don't know it. For background, I was raised pagan and when I became a Christian my family mocked me. (That was fun!) I still consider myself culturally pagan, meaning although my beliefs don't align with being pagan anymore, I recognize it as an important part of my life.

    Anyway, it is all about the patient. I don't wear any sort of Christian or pagan symbol because being a nurse is not about ME or my beliefs. Nursing has a spiritual side but the patient dictates it. That does not mean that patients of any belief system should preach to their nurses or anything; rather, it means that if the patient desires any sort of spiritual input in his or her care, it must be the patient desiring it.

    Wearing a cross, to me, might make a non Christian patient uncomfortable, or a Christian patient TOO comfortable with me.

    When you are my patient, what I believe does NOT matter.
    kabfighter and somenurse like this.
  4. Visit  db2xs profile page
    0
    I am a fusion of Hinduism (primary) and Native American spirituality. My grandfather was Buddhist but my country of ancestry is now riddled with fanatical Christians.

    To say the least, whatever my spiritual leaning is, when I am with a patient, it is about supporting their beliefs, whether they're Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Buddhist, whatever. That's what hospital chaplains do as well--or at least are supposed to do.
  5. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    3
    Quote from kabfighter
    We are all born atheists until we are brainwashed by the society around us. Atheism is not a system of beliefs any more than not believing in Santa is. We find insufficient evidence to accept religious claims as fact, and therefore reject the claims as preposterous. The Bible is less believable than Homer's Odyssey, yet a great majority of Americans accept it as fact (at least in part). This makes me shake me head in disappointment in my countryfolk. I was fortunate to grow up in the least religious state in the country. We also have the highest rate of high school graduation and one of the lowest crime rates. It's a good place overall.

    "Any god that would allow such misery to exist cannot be GOOD, and any god that is powerless to prevent it cannot be GOD." -The Buddha

    "You are your own god." -The Buddha
    tnmarie, 5ummer, and llg like this.
  6. Visit  kabfighter profile page
    4
    Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able?
    Then he is not omnipotent.
    Is he able, but not willing?
    Then he is malevolent.
    Is he both able and willing?
    Then whence cometh evil?
    Is he neither able nor willing?
    Then why call him God? -Epicurus

    tnmarie, goingontheRN, llg, and 1 other like this.
  7. Visit  JordanHudson profile page
    0
    I am a Christian and attend a private christian university. I big on religion and take my faith very seriously. I just applied for a nursing program that is part of a Christian based hospital system but i'm sure many nonbelievers attend it. When I am working in hospitals I won't be one to push my beliefs or judge my patients based on their beliefs. I will however be more than happy to discuss my religion and pray with patients and their families IF they request that service. I believe that it is just as important in healing as the physical aspect of nursing. With that being said, I also would like to point out that their mission statement is "
    [FONT=OpenSans]To extend Christian ministry by caring for the whole person--body, mind and spirit--and by working with others to improve health and quality of life in our communities." To me this applies to the way that I will approach my patients but I would never overstep boundaries by pushing my beliefs on my [FONT=OpenSans, Verdana][COLOR=#5a5f69]patient coworkers or on anyone for that matter.
    [FONT=OpenSans]
  8. Visit  Mr Midwife profile page
    2
    I've always listed my religion as Biker (Catholic under Pope Valentino Rossi), the other male midwife in my unit says he's Protestant Biker under Minister Stoner!
    NRSKarenRN and goingontheRN like this.
  9. Visit  bugya90 profile page
    1
    I was raised catholic and am a " Christian" trying to figure out what exactly I believe. I don't take everything my preist and nuns taught me for fact. I believe man wrote the bible several years after Christ's death so how do we know how much of it is true? I have atheist friends and can understand some of the points they have brought up. There is just something inside of me telling me there is something more, I'm just still trying to figure out what that is. I respect all religions and beliefs and live learning from people of different faiths. I think as long as you have a reason for what you believe and aren't just "following the crowd" then you have every right to believe whatever.
    ceccia likes this.
  10. Visit  C-lion profile page
    0
    I am a Buddhist in the deep South, and work at a Christian hospital. I did not do any clinicals there, so I was unaware that they pipe in prayer over the intercom each day, or that each meeting would start with a prayer. We have been taught to respect patients religions, but I feel like it is assumed that all the employees are Christians.
  11. Visit  grandpaj profile page
    1
    I'm an agnostic, living in an area of the country where there is a church on just about every street corner. I routinely get asked by patients if I'm a Christian, if I share their faith, if I "know Jesus Christ." I debate about whether I should be honest or lie. I work on an oncology unit, where the patients are often terminally ill, and I feel like if I dodge around the question it's the same as saying no. I don't judge anyone based on their religion and don't feel that religious beliefs affect my ability to provide competent and compassionate patient care. I haven't yet come up with a universal strategy for how to deal with these questions - rather, I just try to answer based on what I feel the patient wants to hear and how much of a rapport we've built. Sometimes though, I feel like patients want nurses to share their religious beliefs, as though it affects the quality of the care one provides, and that can be frustrating.
    tnmarie likes this.
  12. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Quote from maybelaterRN
    I'm an agnostic, living in an area of the country where there is a church on just about every street corner. I routinely get asked by patients if I'm a Christian, if I share their faith, if I "know Jesus Christ." I debate about whether I should be honest or lie. I work on an oncology unit, where the patients are often terminally ill, and I feel like if I dodge around the question it's the same as saying no. I don't judge anyone based on their religion and don't feel that religious beliefs affect my ability to provide competent and compassionate patient care. I haven't yet come up with a universal strategy for how to deal with these questions - rather, I just try to answer based on what I feel the patient wants to hear and how much of a rapport we've built. Sometimes though, I feel like patients want nurses to share their religious beliefs, as though it affects the quality of the care one provides, and that can be frustrating.
    As a spiritual agnostic, if someone states to me "Do you know Jesus Christ?" My response is "I am aware if Jesus Christ". If one decides to go further, asking about if I claim him, salvation, etc., I state that "I have a belief system I am comfortable with, tell me more about yours" or something to that effect...most if the time I leave out the belief system and go straight to the tell me more statement...take the lead from the pt...
  13. Visit  qaqueen profile page
    0
    Quote from Merlyn
    Just asking. Atheist means you don't believe in any deities and Pagan means one is polytheistic. Oh well, none of my business anyway. Blessed Be.
    Depends on your definition of pagan. Here are some definitions that you may not have found (or considered)
    1.) "a follower of any of various contemporary religions that are based on the worship of nature or the Earth; a neopagan. "

    2.) "Synonym Study Heathen and pagan are primarily historical terms that were applied pejoratively, especially by people who were Christian, Jewish, or Muslim, to peoples who were not members of one of those three monotheistic religious groups."


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

Visit Our Sponsors
Top
close
close