Things you'd LOVE to be able to tell patients, and get away with it. - page 69

:spin:Just curious as to what you would say. Mine goes something like this: Hi, my name is AngelfireRN, I'll be your nurse tonight. I am not a waitress, nor am I your slave. Yelling... Read More

  1. by   psalm
    No, I'm not calling your doctor coz you want more pain drugs or nausea drugs. If you'd stick to your clear liquid diet and turn your lights off, TV off or down, keep your O2 on and relax and work with the meds, you might feel better.
  2. by   eriksoln
    Quote from squeakykitty
    I'm guessing her body absorbed too much alcohol way too fast, and it was an overdose.
    Makes sense. Man, what people will do these days for..........well,errrr......fun.
  3. by   SoundofMusic
    To the lady last night who gave me the evil eye in the a.m. just because on a night we were short techs, nurses and any decent measure of help, I FORGOT to move her husband to a "window" bed:

    Lady, if you haven't noticed, hospitals are short staffed. I am ONE woman w/ five patients and NO help. You perhaps could have called in and reminded me -- that would have been courteaous. But the immediate needs of pain, meds, and immediate care of my other four patients trumps your husband's need to be near a "window seat" for now.

    I do not appreciate your glares and your short attitude with me. You should be grateful that your husband is receiving care at all in this hospital, that you have insurance, that doctors are working SO hard to find out why he's having repetitive fevers. Your husband is wonderful and very appreciative -- you, however, are an ungrateful wretch of a woman who thinks the world must revolve around you. You and others like you are the reason for problems in health care, in my opinion. But go ahead and crab == because I feel the days are numbered as to how long hospitals and this economy can support bending over backwards for folks like you. There's going to come a breaking point -- and mark my words, you will be on the wrong side of it.
  4. by   psalm
    To the family members and/or friends who parade in from ER for the admission to our floor:

    Please wait in the family room so I can get started on patient care...the pt. comes first...

    I cannot scramble around the whole hospital for a reclliner just because the doctor said you were guaranteed a recliner;

    I don't want you to answer the questions I am asking the patient unless said pt. is unable to answer;

    Box lunches are for pts, go to the cafe for your food;

    No, don't bring any food back to the pt. room; the pt. is nauseated, has an NG tube and eating in front of her is just plain mean, as well as smell of your food is making her nauseated;

    No, I cannot "share" with you the personal issues your loved one has unless there is permission from the pt.

    There's many more of these we can all add to, but most importantly, these are things I'd like to say just ONCE and not have to repeat over and over and over and over and over to the same family/friends.
  5. by   twistedpupchaser
    Your daughter is having trouble breathing so do you want that blanket (for yourself) before or after I stabilise her?
  6. by   Chixie
    JUST SHUT UP!!!or by the gods i will strangle you with that call bell!!!


    and to the relatives please stop ringing at handover/during bedbaths/during meals- i am rushed off my feet,i dont have time to give you a 30 minute run down on how your relative is, hell i havent even seen him yet-how about you just come in and visit?

    and something else whilst im here-thank you to the relative who rang every 20 minutes asking when her husband will be discharged-ive told you 8 times, we will RING YOU!!

    oh and another thing-asking how your husband/father/sister/mother is today is of no help to me if you dont tell me their name!!!i am not psychic!!!!!!!!
  7. by   medpsychRN
    For my patient who drops the f bomb every time I ask him to do something..."right back atcha!" LOL
  8. by   teeniebert
    Quote from squeakykitty
    I'm guessing her body absorbed too much alcohol way too fast, and it was an overdose.
    Most likely. The nice thing about taking alcohol PO is that, when you pass out, you stop drinking and have less chance of overdosing. If you take it PR it not only gets absorbed faster, but your body continues absorbing it after you've passed out.

    I love this thread, btw.
    To the gentleman who requested prn Vicodin yesterday morning: When I ask if you can tell me your full name and birthdate, answering, "No," will not go over well...especially when you're A&Ox3. To the CENA in the room at the time, thanks for backing me up. I know he's Joe Schmoe, you know he's Joe Schmoe, but I will NOT give narcotics without a positive ID, especially on my instructor's license. When you said, "come on, she can't give you the meds unless you say who you are," I thought he was going to dislocate his eyeballs from rolling them so hard! :icon_roll
  9. by   diane227
    Patients and family members do not care if you are short staffed. They need and want care. I recommend that you never tell patients or relatives that you are short staffed. The best way to deal with patients that are a pain is to set limits and to let them know that you will be with them as soon as you can. I tell them that their nurse is involved with another patient right now but she will get to your room shortly. This usually enough for them to understand. As charge, if it is something I can do to help the nurse or CNA, I do.
  10. by   talaxandra
    Quote from eriksoln
    I've many a family member flash the fact that they have a medical background like it were a badge that was going to get the preferential treatment or something.
    I love when that happens. Or when they say that and think you'll give out extra information ("fantastic - as a nurse/doctor/OT you know that we're legally not allowed to disclose information about the patient over the phone. So many laypeople just don't understand that").
  11. by   talaxandra
    "Yeah, no worries - even though there isn't an order I'd be happy to get you the benzos you want. No, we don't have to tell anyone, it can be our little secret. I'm not quite sure how I'll fudge the figures in the book that, according to Federal law, is checked at every change of shift and kept for five years, but it'll be sweet. I didn't really want to keep my registration any way and would much rather you got a little rest." Or we'll wait for the resident, who's off at a code, to assess you and prescribe whatever s/he thinks is appropriate.
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from diane227
    patients and family members do not care if you are short staffed. they need and want care. i recommend that you never tell patients or relatives that you are short staffed. the best way to deal with patients that are a pain is to set limits and to let them know that you will be with them as soon as you can. i tell them that their nurse is involved with another patient right now but she will get to your room shortly. this usually enough for them to understand. as charge, if it is something i can do to help the nurse or cna, i do.
    [font="comic sans ms"]vent threads are for venting.
  13. by   fuzzywuzzy
    We have an alert and oriented resident who is rude and verbally abusive to all us CNAs. Tonight when I was helping her get ready for bed she actually had the nerve to slap me and throw a dirty washcloth in my face :angryfire: and when I told her that I don't have to put up with that kind of abuse, she said I should be grateful for it in the first place because she "pays my salary."

    What I did say: "I am leaving the room now. I can't deal with your behavior right now. I'll come back in a few minutes to see if you're ready to carry on without abusing me."

    What I wanted to say, "You pay my salary huh? Well guess what? Spending the last hour in here with you was NOT WORTH 13 BUCKS! So either give me a raise, or wash your own damn ass!"

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