Inspiration is the Fancy Half of Breathing

by jadelpn Guide | 5,931 Views | 16 Comments

Gives new meaning to the phrase "take a breath". Ethics classes in nursing should start looking at balancing what a nurse needs to do for a patient, and what the patient wants the nurse to do for them. For what management wants - it has little to do with good patient care. Frustrations rise, and nurses are left wondering...what the heck has happened here?

  1. 30

    Inspiration is the Fancy Half of Breathing

    When did parts of nursing become a weird cult? That somehow, there's a lot of nurses drinking kool-aid at a party where you would prefer water? (or for some a stiff adult beverage?)

    The newest and greatest seems to be a constant message of nurses being in charge of their own stuff, when in reality, they are not in charge at all.

    Blame is fickle. If things are good and numbers are up, then management takes a bow, cheers themselves that they are successful, and starts a new plan to cut even more nursing staff to just play on the edge to see how far they can take their perceived success. After all, there is such a huge nursing surge of new grads who want to work, who cares who is stepped on along the way. Loyalty is a thing of the long past.

    If things are not so good, it is blamed on nursing. They are resistant to change. There is no way that anyone can prove that 7-8 patients are "too many". If you don't have the time, you need to make the time--as meal breaks are over-rated anyways.

    Then comes the part where nurses are given "opportunity" such as clinical ladders and other marketing type tools to make it likely that the patient ultimately doesn't get a nurse's all, but gosh darn it, we will give you a rung on the ladder of success. A "feel good" concept. Motivational "you are in control of your own ship/plane/bus" is a theory based on if it seems like a nurse is important, who cares if they have a huge patient load. "We believe in you" means dollar signs once you board the train to wonderland.

    Never have nurses felt so bullied, disrespected and harassed as they seem to at present by management. It is a rat race extraordinaire. And there are literally hundreds of threads on this very subject on AN as we speak. Hang up your art part of nursing--heck even your science--just embrace customer service. Only the customers are gravely ill, and you hold their lives and/or livelihood in balance. And all of the magnet/clinical steps/inspiration for the modern nurse/set sail for success stuff will not bring a patient back, a mistake unmade, a nurse's passion for being a nurse.

    Patient focus doesn't mean moving forward with patient function being priority. Patient focus is now on serving wants, being kind to visitors, making time out of no time at all.

    It is the ultimate ethical dilemma of modern nursing. Can a nurse be focused on the life and well being of a patient's function--while at the same time smiling, nodding, heck practically bowing and keeping a patient focus on why they are hospitalized and prevention as opposed to if their soup is too cold, their room is too hot, and the smart aleck nurse was rude to their cousins?

    Facilities have become business model corporations, and nurses the customer service reps. That they have the knowledge and ability to help a patient live is a side note.
    Last edit by Joe V on Jun 25
    toomuchbaloney, merlee, brandy1017, and 27 others like this.
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    About jadelpn

    jadelpn has '25' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'ER, Med Surg'. From 'Massachusetts'; 49 Years Old; Joined Nov '08; Posts: 3,494; Likes: 7,946.

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    16 Comments so far...

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    Oh yeah, we are slaves to corporate greed, for a long time now.
    It's not going to change in our lifetime.

    Think it's spelled cuzzins

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yi6X...Dn6P-auPu_e6iw
    Last edit by Been there,done that on Jun 18 : Reason: addition
  4. 14
    Google "nurse staffing ratios" for research articles proving that more nurses means better care. (My cut/paste options aren't working)

    www.hopkinsmedicine.org states that patient satisfaction does not correlate with surgical quality scores.

    WWW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV/PUBMED/12615592 states that pt satisfaction doesn't reflect hospital quality measures. In fact, patients don't even report their wait times in a way that predicts the actual documanted wait.

    There was a recent blog I read that quoted an article that said an increase in patient satisfaction scores at one hospital actually coincided with an increase ion mortality and infection. Of course I can't remember which blog or find the original article. (Found it!! www.medscape.com/viewarticle/826280 )

    This pendulum is going to swing back, but by then the suits will have something else to squawk about.
    Last edit by canoehead on Jun 19 : Reason: add a link
    toomuchbaloney, brandy1017, Nola009, and 11 others like this.
  5. 14
    It is a sad state of affairs, I agree. Call it what you will. Ok, call it customer service ... Please noooo! We knew that was a bad idea at the start.
    TriciaJ, toomuchbaloney, brandy1017, and 11 others like this.
  6. 19
    If you allow your noncompliant post op patient to sit in bed and not ambulate, only use bedpans instead of walking to the bedside commode or bathroom, not eat "because I don't feel like it/have an appetite", not use the incentive spirometer "because it hurts", and have narcotics even when their respiratory rate is 10, you may have good "customer service," but you may have a readmission with DVT or worse PE, pneumonia, and possibly a stage II pressure ulcer.
  7. 7
    Quote from Been there,done that
    Oh yeah, we are slaves to corporate greed, for a long time now.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yi6X...Dn6P-auPu_e6iw
    Perfect, Beenthere,donethat! And this was before Citizens United and McCutcheon.
  8. 10
    BRAVO!!!! Great article, jadelpn!!
  9. 8
    Quote from canoehead
    Google "nurse staffing ratios" for research articles proving that more nurses means better care. (My cut/paste options aren't working)

    www.hopkinsmedicine.org states that patient satisfaction does not correlate with surgical quality scores.

    WWW.NCBI.NLM.NIH.GOV/PUBMED/12615592 states that pt satisfaction doesn't reflect hospital quality measures. In fact, patients don't even report their wait times in a way that predicts the actual documanted wait.

    There was a recent blog I read that quoted an article that said an increase in patient satisfaction scores at one hospital actually coincided with an increase ion mortality and infection. Of course I can't remember which blog or find the original article. (Found it!! www.medscape.com/viewarticle/826280 )

    ****This pendulum is going to swing back, but by then the suits will have something else to squawk about.
    ****Time for us to push it back.
    TriciaJ, Guttercat, canoehead, and 5 others like this.
  10. 6
    **** Press-Ganey for that matter. Clinical decisions are becoming influenced by how happy the 'customers' are and you can see it in the readmissions and early discharges.
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Jun 19 : Reason: Tos
    Guttercat, bluenurse85, joanna73, and 3 others like this.
  11. 9
    Quote from FransBevy
    **** Press-Ganey for that matter. Clinical decisions are becoming influenced by how happy the 'customers' are and you can see it in the readmissions and early discharges.
    And it's not complying with the CMS's nursing outcomes model...this model of outcomes is supposed to be driven by nurses.

    If I was a gazillionaire, I would buy out PG and put nurses in charge of it...I can only dream...
    Last edit by traumaRUs on Jun 19 : Reason: Tos


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