If You Had To Do It All Again Would You Go Straight For RN Instead?!

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    I'm doing some pre-reqs for nursing school right now and heard about a good LPN school close to where I live. I'm now contemplating becoming a LPN first and then doing my RN studies online. Just wanted feedback from some of you doing the same. I would ideally like to be a RN because I have a big interest in legal nursing, but I'm wondering if LPN would be a better bet than doing 5 more pre-req courses and a HHA course in addition to an 18 month wait for the RN program. My mother is an LPN and feels she got a great background in clinicals and more so than some RN. This is back in the 80's so things might have changed, but she did feel her hands on experiece was great. TY to all who reply.
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  5. 0
    Quote from Batman24
    I'm doing some pre-reqs for nursing school right now and heard about a good LPN school close to where I live. I'm now contemplating becoming a LPN first and then doing my RN studies online. Just wanted feedback from some of you doing the same. I would ideally like to be a RN because I have a big interest in legal nursing, but I'm wondering if LPN would be a better bet than doing 5 more pre-req courses and a HHA course in addition to an 18 month wait for the RN program. My mother is an LPN and feels she got a great background in clinicals and more so than some RN. This is back in the 80's so things might have changed, but she did feel her hands on experiece was great. TY to all who reply.
    I'm in LPN school, I will graduate in August. My Dean of nursing told us that she thinks we will be more prepared as RN's because of how much one on one with patients in clinicals. She had started out as a LPN 30 some years ago and now that she is a RN with her Masters says that being a LPN helped her be a better RN. I think your mom gave you good advice. Everyone I have talked to that was a LPN first has told me the same thing.

    Although I did want to go for my RN first, it just happend that getting into the LPN program with no wait and then going on to my RN, I will finish sooner than if I had waited to get into the RN program.
    Good luck to you.
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    I did my LPN first and then bridged into an RN program and now am continuing on and doing my BSN while working. It has some advantages but if I had to do it all over I would do an RN program. It was faster doing it the way I did it in some ways but it also involved more school over all. The reason I did it the way I did it was because the waiting list for the LPN was only 6 months and I completed pre-reqs at the same time I did the LPN and went on the RN wait list even before I went on the LPN wait list so that when I graduated I only had to wait about 6 months to bridge into the RN program but part of that wait was because I had to do a bridge in course before getting qualifying to get into the RN program, and my school required to have all things completed including the bridge in program with a 3 month gap before I could be accepted. I also had to rely on spots available at the 2nd year entry point which is a VERY popular spot essentially meaning other people failing out of the program to get those spots. So it is complicated. Before making a decision I would check out all the rules for the RN program before making a decision. The other thing is (from my experience only)that some of the instructors for the RN program did not treat the LPN students equally who joined the RN program. One of my friends with many years experience as an LPN was actually failed because the instructors didn't like her or think she was "RN material". She fought the school and did eventually graduate but went through a horrible experience but contrary to their opinion is doing well now and passed NCLEX with no problem (1st try with only 75 questions) which the instructors from the RN program told her she would not be able to do. Just letting you know some of the politics involved into transitioning into a different school. Some of my friends who I graduated with from the LPN program transitioned into the RN program at the same school they took the LPN program with (which started later than when I started my RN program) had a better experience since they went to the same school and the instructors were more nurturing through the transition but everyone may have a different experience. I figure by the time I finish my BSN I will have at least an extra year of classes as compared to someone who does the BSN from the start but I also have had the advantage of working throughout and having my employer pay for my RN to BSN classes which is a very nice advantage. So many things to consider. I had the end goal of at least a BSN since that is the entry level requirement in Canada where I may move someday but that is a completely different topic. If you have any other specific questions you can PM me. Good luck in making your decision.
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    No, I'm happy with the way I decided to do it. Good luck.
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    Yes, I deeply regret not going straight for the BSN! I originally was in a 1+1 program in Las Vegas where you did a year of RN pre-reqs, then you did your LPN year, took the NCLEX-PN and then did the RN part. However, hubby was only stationed in Vegas for 18 months so I got thru the pre-reqs and the LPN year and then we moved to Indianapolis. Then...(this was 1992), there was 3-4 year wait at IU and the other public schools of nursing for the bridge program. So, I ended up at Marian College (read: private and very $$$) but no waiting list. I did the bridge program immediately and graduated in 1994 with my ADN. Then...we moved to IL. I started working at a Magnet facility and realized pretty quickly that I wouldn't be going anywhere w/o a BSN. So...back to school. Went ahead (because by now I was 44 years old) and did the BSN, then MSN. Stopped there but realized I hated management and teaching didn't pay enough. So...off to a post-MSN program. Graduated in 2006 and have been working as an advanced practice nurse since. Still not my dream job but plenty of money and flexibility.
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    I wished that I would have gone straight for my RN. But since I didn't, my LPN my help me get into the RN program faster (via bridge). It is more expensive to do the LPN thing first if you know that you are going to be an RN, in my personal opinion.
  10. 0
    Great question. I am there with you...

    I am contemplating which program to do as well. I am going to apply to a part-time ASN program at my school for Fall 08. I know that I am almost a shoe in for the LPN program though. It is quite easy to get into . Last semester a girl I know got in with a C on one of her pre-reqs and a 78 on her TEAS. I have all A's so far. My problem is if I don't get accepted to ASN should I wait and try again for spring? (I will have to go to another campus) or apply to the LPN for fall 08 and then go through LPN-ASN transition afterwards. I figured I would end up with an ASN in about the same amount of time since it will take 6 semesters (2yrs) to go through Part-time ASN.

    Decisions, Decisions!
    Last edit by wishNhopeNdreamN on Feb 2, '08
  11. 0
    For me the RN schools are so competive, it made sense for me to go the LPN route. My LPN school was a boot camp, it really help me develop great nursing and study skills. Right now working as a LPN, my hospital and my higher salary range helps me pay for my private RN school.
  12. 0
    Go straight for your RN. I have been an LPN for over 25 yrs. Been doing the RN work and paid half all these years!
  13. 0
    If I had no kids. Did not have to worry about money. And no resposibilities I may have done it a different way and gone right for RN.
    But back to reality single mom of 3, need to work, have ton of resposibilities........Nope would not do it different.


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