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KrysyRN

KrysyRN

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  1. Definitely take it. You are assessing and triaging. Maybe even getting a complete health history in there. Very important nursing skills.
  2. When you're close to the end of your nursing program, your nursing school administrative office will most likely provide a NCLEX application form for you to fill in that gets handed right back to the office once you've completed the form. On that form, you'll find an option to select the state you'd like to be licensed after you pass the NCLEX. When you receive your authorization to test (ATT), you can take the exam anywhere in this country and will receive a NC license when you pass.
  3. You may want to consider joining AAMCN - American Association of Managed Care Nurses - and their certification course. The certification may be helpful with landing one of the jobs you're interested in. Another good way to find these jobs and to network is on LinkedIn. Find nurses in your area that are doing this type of work and see if the have any advice for you or know of openings. Maybe set up some informational interviews with them. Anecdotally, my nurse friend found a chart auditing position on Craig's List of all places. She works for a major, monstrous university and travels around the state auditing charts in a car they rent for her. She had no prior experience doing this kind of work and said the pay was not good. No benefits. But she loves the job.
  4. KrysyRN

    Anxious, depressed, and might need to go to HR.

    I'm really sorry to read you are going through this. It triggered some memories for me that I thought I'd share. You're not alone in having this type of experience. I completely relate to your story. In the span of three years, I had two different nurse supervisors, back-to-back, at two different places of employment, in two different states, that could have been the same person. Same age. They looked so much alike they could have been sisters. But the kicker was they both had they same sociopathic personality. I don't use this label lightly. What they both did and said to me, while I was doing the best work possible, with a professional and positive attitude, was horrible. I started to wonder what was wrong with me that I could be so far off track in their eyes. I lost sleep, and a depression set in that I couldn't shake. Nothing brought any happiness to me. At one of the jobs it started to occur to me early on that the problem wasn't me, it was both of these supervisors. An example: I was alone in a very small room with my supervisor, and she shut the door to give me my monthly eval. I'll never forget the look in her eyes. The things she said to me were meant to be daggers and were in no way constructive. I remember thinking, I'm dealing with someone who is not right in the head. I wondered if someone had made the same comments to her in the past, and she was just waiting for an opportunity to maliciously use those comments on someone else. I said as little as possible during the eval. She made fun of me and listed what she thought were my character flaws. These flaws were fabrications in her mind. I think she was trying to get me to cry. After a few months of experiences worse than this, I went to her manager and said, "I can't work with someone I don't respect." I was switched to a different dpmt with a different manager. Talk about a night and day 180 degree difference for the better. Because of my experiences, I started studying personality types (borderline personalities, narcissistic, and sociopathic personality disorders) and the effects of these disorders in the workplace. It's eye-opening and has given me the tools to deal with people that show signs of these disorders. I admire that you sought help and wish you all the best. Good things may come from this.
  5. KrysyRN

    Broken chain of custody

    Unbelievable is an understatement. This is horrifying!
  6. Yes...I have worked in a place like this. It was in an occupational health clinic that employed 2 RN's (one being the manager), 2 LPNs, and 2 MAs. It did not serve that clinic well not to have a policy manual. They didn't know what they didn't know, so to speak. I don't think you're making too much out of this. I do think you should do what is right. Would you be able to get copies of policies from other facilities that can be adapted to your facility? I realize that info is proprietary, but you never know. Or if you have time, start writing some protocols that your administrator can sign off on.
  7. KrysyRN

    Being a target by a coworker.

    I'm going to give you some different advice. I think you SHOULD go to HR to let them know what's been happening. If she's fabricating - LYING - about you, she needs to be reported and fired. Slander and libel (defamation) should never be tolerated. I would stop speaking to her unless absolutely necessary, and even then, with a witness present.
  8. KrysyRN

    Director who doesn't direct

  9. I used to work on a postpartum unit where an RN, LPN, and CNA would work as a team and were assigned 12 patients on a 36-bed unit. The RNs responsibilities included the assessments, rounds with physicians, chart checks (paper charting), and discharge teaching. The LPNs responsibilities included med administration, IV therapy, pre-op prep, and staple removal. The CNAs did all of the basic care and wheeled moms down to their cars at discharge. Are any nurses still working with teams like this in any units in hospitals? We were a well-oiled machine, and I don't ever remember feeling overwhelmed, even when we had several higher acuity patients, and admits and discharges coming at us left and right.
  10. KrysyRN

    Nursing School Forces Retake of Passed Courses

    I agree with not.done.yet. The school's goal is a 100% pass rate on NCLEX. That's what will keep the school of nursing in business....not the extra monies that students must pay for retake of a semester. Anecdotally, I recall at my former nursing school, if a nursing student didn't pass the exit exam, the student was required to complete 6,000 NCLEX-style practice questions before the end of the semester. Students were allowed to use any books or online websites (probably had to be pre-approved) to reach their 6,000 goal. Our computer lab also had programs with NCLEX practice questions, so the student did not have to spend an extra dime to complete the questions. It's unfortunate your school doesn't have an option like this.
  11. Fascinating! Did the lessons belong to someone you know? I believe my great aunt graduated from this nursing school, but I'm unsure when. It could very well have been around 1936. This thread is a fun read!
  12. I received my BSN from WGU. I share your sentiments! I love this school. I plan on heading back into an MSN program through them.
  13. KrysyRN

    Impersonating a nurse

    try emailing the ca bon. i just got this off of their website: licensee services & general information for questions regarding license renewal, license verification, rn name and address changes, continuing education, and all other inquiries. fax: (916) 574-7699 email: renewals_brn@dca.ca.gov
  14. KrysyRN

    BSN programs: location, location, location

    Yes. Not only to meet potential employers, but this is a good way to see which hospitals, clinics, or floors you might like to work on as you're doing your clinical rotations through them.
  15. I would double check on this if I were you.. Make sure you don't have to work for a certain amount of hours as an RN in Ohio or Indiana before applying for a Michigan license. It might be just me, but it doesn't make sense that Michigan would give you a license to practice only if you passed boards in another state first.
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