New nurses wanted. - page 5

I have just read a post in a Nursing Specialties forum on Staff Development that makes reference to the need to recognize and nurture new nurses because the nursing-eat-their-young attitude is so... Read More

  1. Visit  edimo profile page
    4
    Quote from GrnTea
    We welcome whole-heartedly, unreservedly, new nurses who are willing to put their education in its proper place, planning and providing competent care. We love the one who doesn't come in and say, "I'm just working here for a year so I can go to ICU and then go to CRNA / NP school." We want good nurses; we are willing to help new nurses who want to work wherever there is a need even if it's not their dreeeeaammmm job, and work hard, to grow. We want to work with people who don't have such a twitchy trigger finger, ready to go off with a bang over the least perceived slight. We want colleagues who believe this: Let me never fall into the vulgar mistake of dreaming that I am persecuted whenever I am contradicted. (~Ralph Waldo Emerson)

    Anyone who wants to be a nurse who has the strength of character to do that, we're ready for you. Are you ready for us? We are already here.
    During my first year, we lost a few nurses since they had found positions they were really interested in which is good for them...but my problem was when they would say things like "this place isn't challenging for me", "who would stay here for more than five years" or "I only took this job for financial reasons" IN FRONT of people who have worked there the majority of their careers, I take issue with that...even if I am fairly new myself since that it flat out disrespectful.

    The area might not have been challenging for them since they were not assigned the highly sick patients because they demonstrated behaviors that even made the NM nervous. Some were flat out cocky and didn't ask questions...what is wrong with you?!? When in doubt, ask...don't just do!

    Anyways, GrnTea...lovely post!
    poppycat, anotherone, SoldierNurse22, and 1 other like this.
  2. Visit  elkpark profile page
    7
    Quote from Cyoung07
    I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    Really, threats??? Is that supposed to help the situation? In my book, that's significantly worse (and less professional) behavior than that shown by the nurse(s) you are suppposedly confronting. If I were on the receiving end of anything like that from a coworker, I'd be "redirecting my negative energy" to contacting the police.
    C-lion, llg, Altra, and 4 others like this.
  3. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    9
    Quote from Cyoung07
    THe article is interesting but being a new nurse or how ever you want to term it..i have expereinced the dismay, negative attitude, judgemental and overly critical seasoned nurses. I have seen first had, have experienced and have even made it a point to speak my mind when this behaviour happens. Obviously it is not every where and every floor but there are seasoned nurses and I am not necessarily speaking of nurses who have been 10+ years; i have seen it experienced it from nurses who have only been on the job 1+ year..
    It is disgusting cause no one no matter what stage of your career deserves to be treated with such disgust..
    Seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse and only knowing how the school instructed you whcih is usally outdated.
    I refused to be belittled by a nurse no matter how seasoned they are. I am here to elarn from you, take constructive criticism and yes i will make mistakes, and will be slower and will hold the progress up and at times i do understand you asking em to step aside cause there is a time crunch but i refuse to accept the negative and ****** attitude.
    I exepreinced this as a new nurses as well as when i was doing my clinical rotations at the hospital...I had several seasonced nurses during my clinical rotaiton who simply told me they do not have time for me and asked me to simply sit at the nurses station cause they were tired of training..but in front of there supervisor or nurses manager their who demeanor changes and as soon as they exit they revert back to the disguisting individual they are.
    I know this happens every where and every industry to a point it just seems more prevalent in the nursing industry.
    So before everyone chimes in on how this is just an urban legend it is not..those nurses that behave this way know who they are.
    I personally had to call a seasoned nurse out not during work hours but after a shift and we are walking to the car i have stopped the nruse and in the most polite way have expressed my dismay and some apologize and some have simply told me this is not a career for the weak. and my response has been if you are going to dish out negativity and expect me because i am a new nurse to take it as a rite of passage you have mistaken me for an 18 year old..I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    I'm not sure where you're getting your data that "seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse." I can assure you that after more than three decades, I have not forgotten. I have very vivid memories of my first days as a brand new nurse. New nurses, however, have no idea what it's like to be a seasoned nurse tasked with orienting a new grad and keeping up with a patient assignment that may or may not consider the new nurse's need to be walked through the steps of many of the procedures we'll do that day.

    I'm also unsure where you've gotten the data that seasoned nurses don't know anything except how their school instructed them, and that their information is usually updated. Most of the seasoned nurses I know take advantage of the myriad opportunities for continuing education which are available and are very up-to-date in our specialty.

    Your post evokes an attitude of disrespect for the experienced nurses -- to the point of threatening behavior. I sincerely hope that you didn't seriously threaten that nurse with damage to her tires. That is beyond a refusal to tolerate negative behavior -- threats should not be tolerated.
    llg, elkpark, Altra, and 6 others like this.
  4. Visit  limaRN profile page
    7
    Quote from Cyoung07
    THe article is interesting but being a new nurse or how ever you want to term it..i have expereinced the dismay, negative attitude, judgemental and overly critical seasoned nurses. I have seen first had, have experienced and have even made it a point to speak my mind when this behaviour happens. Obviously it is not every where and every floor but there are seasoned nurses and I am not necessarily speaking of nurses who have been 10+ years; i have seen it experienced it from nurses who have only been on the job 1+ year..
    It is disgusting cause no one no matter what stage of your career deserves to be treated with such disgust..
    Seasoned nurses often forget what it is to be a new nurse and only knowing how the school instructed you whcih is usally outdated.
    I refused to be belittled by a nurse no matter how seasoned they are. I am here to elarn from you, take constructive criticism and yes i will make mistakes, and will be slower and will hold the progress up and at times i do understand you asking em to step aside cause there is a time crunch but i refuse to accept the negative and ****** attitude.
    I exepreinced this as a new nurses as well as when i was doing my clinical rotations at the hospital...I had several seasonced nurses during my clinical rotaiton who simply told me they do not have time for me and asked me to simply sit at the nurses station cause they were tired of training..but in front of there supervisor or nurses manager their who demeanor changes and as soon as they exit they revert back to the disguisting individual they are.
    I know this happens every where and every industry to a point it just seems more prevalent in the nursing industry.
    So before everyone chimes in on how this is just an urban legend it is not..those nurses that behave this way know who they are.
    I personally had to call a seasoned nurse out not during work hours but after a shift and we are walking to the car i have stopped the nruse and in the most polite way have expressed my dismay and some apologize and some have simply told me this is not a career for the weak. and my response has been if you are going to dish out negativity and expect me because i am a new nurse to take it as a rite of passage you have mistaken me for an 18 year old..I am 40 years old and no one will speak to me in that demaenor with out conseqences..and the response has been what are you gonna do run and snitch on me and my response is ohh no snitches end up in ditches but it would be a shame for you care to have a flat for the next 3 months of my training..with a nice bright smile..lol..
    i know not nice or tastefull but that surely made the nurse think and redirect her negative energy to more positive criticism..lol

    ACY
    This is by far the most unprofessional statement I have read on this site.
    C-lion, llg, Esme12, and 4 others like this.
  5. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    3
    Sometimes I just smh at some of these posts and posters. It's so hard to believe some people on here are functioning adults. However there are some good points that were brought out in the article and by some of the other posters. I think there is often a gap between newer nurses and experienced ones that can make them working together difficult. It can come from both ways honestly.
    metal_m0nk, poppycat, and anotherone like this.
  6. Visit  applewhitern profile page
    3
    I don't mind helping new nurses as long as they put their cell phone up while at work. It is very disheartening to be speaking to a new nurse and they actually ANSWER their cell phone while you are in mid-sentence! And note I did not say "young nurse," I said "new nurse." I have this cell phone problem with all ages. I hate the constant peck peck peck of texting, and the constant vibrating of a call or new message. If I am in the middle of trying to teach you something, please put the phone away and listen to me. If I approach you and want to discuss something work related, please at least look up from your phone and acknowledge me. If you are pecking away at your phone, or smiling/laughing at something on your phone, then no, I probably won't try to talk to you because I feel put-off. Also, please learn THIS job, not the one you hope to have someday. And lastly, I do bedside nursing because I want to, not because I couldn't get a "management job." I have a business degree, too, and have been in management. My first degree was accounting and business administration, for Pete's sake!
  7. Visit  ThePrincessBride profile page
    3
    While I agree with some of this post, from my personal experience, the most bitter and callous nurses I have come across are the same ones most removed from nursing school. That is not to say that all seasoned nurses are this way, but I have found that I have had more positive relationships with younger nurses than older ones for this particular reason. I think this can be said in MANY fields, so this isn't just directed to nurses (though it is probably a bigger issue in a field where people feel undervalued and unappreciated).

    Also...

    "I'm just working here for a year so I can go to ICU and then go to CRNA / NP school."
    There is nothing wrong with people wanting to advance themselves in their practice and education. In fact, in this economy where there is a glut of new nurses and the bedside wages are stagnant, it is probably a smart move to further one's education; it opens up more doors and a higher income and more flexibility in the job market. I would like to start grad school as soon as possible because I want to be finished with school prior to starting a family.

    That being said, I see what you are saying.

    We, better than they, have a clearer vision of being in those beds rather than beside them;
    I disagree with this on so many levels. I'm not even a nurse (yet), but I have been in those beds multiple times, once with a urinary catheter, potassium levels at a dangerously low level, hair falling out, charcoal in the stomach and in utter despair after trying to take my life. You don't need to have dozens of years of experience at the bedside to know what it is like to be a patient.
  8. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    1
    I'm not even a nurse (yet), but I have been in those beds multiple times, once with a urinary catheter, potassium levels at a dangerously low level, hair falling out, charcoal in the stomach and in utter despair after trying to take my life. You don't need to have dozens of years of experience at the bedside to know what it is like to be a patient.
    ^..."And this is what makes for a better nurse"
    -my nursing instructor (20+ years experience), when I wrote my essay about my near death experience when I was a LPN...
    EXPERIENCE makes for a better nurse.
    GrnTea likes this.
  9. Visit  metal_m0nk profile page
    2
    Quote from anotherone
    The trainwrecks are everywhere. and we have many new grads. they are split up. i dealt with it fine as have others. if i am to get them all now and still be expected to be at newer nurses beck and call i should be paid more. cant do your job then quit. they dont give the new attendings only easy pts...... you are a nurse , done with orientation, you get the same type of assignments as everyone else or should. we dont dump all the trainwrecks on the new grads or float nurses or any other paranoid victim memtality group. i can see that being the case for some, but on our floor you get what you get.
    I see your point and I don't have problems with trainwrecks even while being an orientee. I thrive under pressure and genuinely enjoy being busy. I prefer to work independently and don't require hand-holding so much as occasional clarification.......And although I really have no specific aspirations, my nurse manager recently told me that she would expect to see me in critical care in the not so distant future. I'm not entirely sure what that says about me as a new nurse, but I did find it interesting when I heard it. I also know that I am the exception and not the rule - so in that, I can definitely see where you're coming from.

    I do also see a few other newbies around me legitimately struggling and from an outside perspective it is clear (with one at least for certain) that much of that struggle is exacerbated by her having a preceptor who isn't very involved, though I'm sure her own hesitation and low level of confidence in herself plays a significant part as well. I wouldn't go so far as to describe her as possessing a "paranoid victim mentality" though, because for her, the scenario I described is very much a reality.
    Last edit by metal_m0nk on Feb 16, '13
    nurseladybug12 and anotherone like this.
  10. Visit  workinmomRN2012 profile page
    1
    To the seasoned nurses " to get respect you have to give it" just because someone is new, does not mean that they are not a human being and because of that they DESERVE respect also. I am over 40 yrs old, please do not talk to me as though I am a 2 yr old, it's very disrespectful and just plain rude. I almost want to ask some of the ruder ones if they were ever taught to be nice to their coworkers. I have been in a few other work environments other than healthcare and I can honestly say that I have never encountered this type of cattiness and rudness in a profession. I am learning what I DO NOT want to be as a nurse. The only way to change it is to STOP IT. If your doing it Stop it and if you witness it SAY SOMETHING to the person doing it!!!! Take action.
    nurseladybug12 likes this.
  11. Visit  GrnTea profile page
    6
    Again, and again, and again: Being corrected is not disrespectful, is not rudeness, is not a personal attack. If I really didn't give a sweet patootie about you, I wouldn't bother to correct you on anything, and I would let you continue on, and your manager would take care of my problem for me when you finally did something awful. However, in the meantime, the patients would suffer for both of our failings.

    As the multiple threads on dealing with rude patients and families attest, nurses need to develop a thicker skin than, say, librarians or chemists or grade-school teachers.

    Your perceptions are yours and you can do what you want with them, but you will miss out on a lot if you keep taking everything so personally. Dialing back the I'm-offended filter will serve you a world of good.

    For example, if you listen hard to them, you will learn something from those "rude" patients about their fears or their misconceptions or their circumstances that will open your eyes to their painful realities and make it possible for you to give them much better care than if you didn't.

    And you will learn something from those "rude" seasoned nurses, too. You might not appreciate it for what it truly is for a long time, but trust me on this one. Any older nurse can testify to the truth in it.
    llg, anotherone, Spidey's mom, and 3 others like this.
  12. Visit  workinmomRN2012 profile page
    0
    GrnTea-I really don't think that some of the seasoned nurses correct new nurses because "they care about them". Have you ever heard of people putting other people down to lift themselves up? It's called low self esteem. I am the first person to say correct me when I'm wrong, I want to learn and do things the right way, and futhermore I actually do have a thick skin. I have not gotten this far without being tough and persistent. Do not confuse my demand for respect for being a baby, thinskinned or any other adjective you can think of. I can tell that this is a losing battle, all I am saying is that it DOES exist. I and many other new nurses have learned quite a bit from some seasoned nurses that actually have people skills, that know how to say in a middle of a crazy day " I'm really crazy busy right now and don't have alot of time to answer questions, so if you could wait until the end of shift I will be glad to answer some of your questions", instead of not even acknowledging that I just asked a question or better yet the ever present sneer of disgust. It's called communication skills ladies, you have to communicate with the families don't you- so it is possible to have a crazy day/week and still know how to talk to one another.
  13. Visit  PatMac10,RN profile page
    3
    While I agree that correction should not always be viewed as a personal attack or act of malice, it would be futile to say that the correction, and the reception of it, can be heavily influenced by the way it is delivered.

    If someone is tactless in their critique, then, of course, it will more than likely cause more problems than it solves. Now am I saying you must "sugar coat" things, most certainly not, these are adults we're working with, but you can't deliver a message in any kind of manner and expect someone to be receptive. There is a way to say things directly and professionally while causing minimal offense. If

    Now some people can handle a more...... Abrupt approach than others.

    For example: take an experienced individual who may have a background in a strict family or military, when speaking or correcting a lesser experienced person who may have a similar background, they may be able to bring across points a certain way without causing offense.

    Rudeness or brevity is never a requirement for a point to stick. You don't have to be rude to get a point across. There is a difference between assertiveness and aggression.

    Training a less experienced one calls for respect, open-mindless, tact, and tolerance from both the learner and the teacher. Tolerance is a key because we are always going to be surrounded by people, whether we are the experienced individual or inexperienced one, who make us want to "reach out and touch them", but in most cases we can't do that without causing more problems.......and losing our jobs. Lol.

    Some people will take offense no matter what you say or how you say it.
    Last edit by PatMac10,RN on Feb 18, '13

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