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PatMac10,RN ADN, BSN, RN

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PatMac10,RN's Latest Activity

  1. PatMac10,RN

    Nurse Practitioner Restrictions

    In some ways it surprises me that North Carolina is as restrictive as it is with APRNs, being the frist state to develop a nursing board adn registry. However, I then look at how frequent bigotry, selfishness, and jealousy are in our part of the world (not that it is any less common anyhwere else) and I am not surprised by the "oppression" that is placed on nursing, in general. It would be wonderful for the South not to be the last to catach on that nurses and APRNs are capable and independent clinicians. If NC isn't going to let APRNS practice independelty from the get go ther e are other options. I think the model, where new APRNs are required to work in a collaborative agreement with a provider for x (12-18months) amount of months before fully independent practice, is a fair one (only if a state is hesitant for allowing full practice authority).
  2. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    Funny this pops up on the allnurses Facebook page. https://allnurses.com/nurse-colleague-patient/why-do-people-818176.html Talks about bullying In Nursing and how it's been impacted.
  3. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    Esme I can agree with your statement. More people in general, now days, seem to have an exaggerated sense of entitlement. This is not the sole cause of "Nurses eating their young"/workplace bullying though. There are most definitely multiple factors from both sides of the "fence" that contribute to this issue. Good point though!
  4. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    I am wondering the same thing metal monk. I feel the same way about my preceptor.
  5. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

  6. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    BrandonLPN, Your quote: "I'm not sure I understand. My whole point is that what the "nurses eat their young" crowd define as "mean" and what I define as "mean" are two different things." Is saying the same thing that Metal Monk was, it's all a matter of perspective. Different people will see and interpret things differently according to their position, experiences, and such.
  7. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    That's right.... and no nurse has no business getting nasty or in w blunder when someone is inexperienced. This is a two way street no matter how you try to contort it. Everything you said is truly on point and can be flipped right back around the "otherway". Both experienced and inexperienced people need to get and keep the right attitude, no that people do not always do things your way and that new information is coming out everyday, know that you can always learn regardless of your position. All need to remember that both roles require humility, even though in different aspects. In general, inexperience doesn't give you an excuse to gripe, moan, complain, and be rude about insignificant things, but neither does experience.
  8. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    So what do you presume the abundant amount of accumulated research means if this wasn't a common problem? It actually happens more than people think, which is it is being reported and recorded and studied. I would think that researchers would devote south literature and effort to such a thing as nurse-to-nurse/workplace bullying if its occurrence was minimal and insignificant. That seems apparent to me. If the issue is contained to be minimized and labeled as a non-issue, then it will continue to worsen until something happens that can't be denied and ignored and must be addressed. So it is really of little value if individuals, now, view this problem as a non-issue now (no matter how apparent it may be) because people at large do view it as a developing problem and eventually it will be addressed and some people might not like the results, on both sides.
  9. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

  10. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

  11. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    While I agree that correction should not always be viewed as a personal attack or act of malice, it would be futile to say that the correction, and the reception of it, can be heavily influenced by the way it is delivered. If someone is tactless in their critique, then, of course, it will more than likely cause more problems than it solves. Now am I saying you must "sugar coat" things, most certainly not, these are adults we're working with, but you can't deliver a message in any kind of manner and expect someone to be receptive. There is a way to say things directly and professionally while causing minimal offense. If Now some people can handle a more...... Abrupt approach than others. For example: take an experienced individual who may have a background in a strict family or military, when speaking or correcting a lesser experienced person who may have a similar background, they may be able to bring across points a certain way without causing offense. Rudeness or brevity is never a requirement for a point to stick. You don't have to be rude to get a point across. There is a difference between assertiveness and aggression. Training a less experienced one calls for respect, open-mindless, tact, and tolerance from both the learner and the teacher. Tolerance is a key because we are always going to be surrounded by people, whether we are the experienced individual or inexperienced one, who make us want to "reach out and touch them", but in most cases we can't do that without causing more problems.......and losing our jobs. Lol. Some people will take offense no matter what you say or how you say it.
  12. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

    Sometimes I just smh at some of these posts and posters. It's so hard to believe some people on here are functioning adults. However there are some good points that were brought out in the article and by some of the other posters. I think there is often a gap between newer nurses and experienced ones that can make them working together difficult. It can come from both ways honestly.
  13. PatMac10,RN

    New nurses wanted.

  14. PatMac10,RN

    Prescriptive Authority for Nurse Practitioners

    Idk how it may work in your area, but all of the NPs (FNP: Family Nurse Practitioners) here on my part of NC do their own suturing, I&D, Pap smear, insert IUDs etc... Idk why an NP would have to send a pt to an MD or PA simply to have a "routine" suturing. I am aware that some NP programs might not focus as much on suturing as others, but most, if not all, of the FNPs that are employed at my hospital had suture training in their NP education; and they can do the aforementioned procedures in individuals if all ages, most of the work in the ED. A few of the NPs and PAs have also told me that they got extra training once finishing their programs in order to feel more confident, by taking CEUs in suturing. Again maybe it's different where you are. I'm in a rural area so maybe that's just the way schools here prepare their NP students.
  15. PatMac10,RN

    Do Nurses Earn Big Money? You Decide.

    Very good points.
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