Getting around the 18 y.o requirement Getting around the 18 y.o requirement - pg.4 | allnurses

Getting around the 18 y.o requirement - page 4

My 14 y.o daughter has 21 college credits and is currently enrolled full time in a community college. She would very much like to be a nurse but does not want to start an Associates degree in nursing... Read More

  1. Visit  kbrn2002 profile page
    #39 2
    If financial aid is not an issue a well rounded education is always beneficial. With a degree in an affiliated field, which is just about anything in the sciences entering a nursing specific program later shouldn't be an issue. There are many members of this community that hold nursing degrees as a second or even third degree. Hopefully one of those members that has gone the route of entering nursing after obtaining a degree in a different field can provide some information on how they did it.
  2. Visit  ItsThatJenGirl profile page
    #40 8
    Quote from lnvitale
    Send her to high school so she can be an adolescent, go to prom, crush on people her own age and do all the rite of passage stuff one needs to do in order to become a young adult, much less a nurse.
    My homeschooled kids get plenty of interaction with other kids - crushes and all. Public school doesn't have the market cornered on life experiences or rites of passage.
  3. Visit  AceOfHearts<3 profile page
    #41 2
    I'd like to address two things:

    1) a poster early on stated even accelerated programs take 2 years which is incorrect. I attended a school with the shortest accelerated BSN (ABSN) program that was 11 months (actually less if you count the total of 5 weeks we had off between classes during the entire program). When applying to programs and going to info sessions I learned most ABSN programs tend to span 14-18 months.

    2) we have a student extern in a vocational program that is still in high school on my unit once a week. She has shadowed me several times. Her role is pretty much the same as a CNA, but I go over the patients (meds, pathophysiology, etc.) with her as well.
  4. Visit  OrganizedChaos profile page
    #42 3
    Quote from lnvitale
    Send her to high school so she can be an adolescent, go to prom, crush on people her own age and do all the rite of passage stuff one needs to do in order to become a young adult, much less a nurse.
    I'd say the OP's daughter has the makings of a great nurse without all of that unnecessary bull poop. She is far ahead of where I was at 14.
  5. Visit  Horseshoe profile page
    #43 6
    Quote from ItsThatJenGirl
    My homeschooled kids get plenty of interaction with other kids - crushes and all. Public school doesn't have the market cornered on life experiences or rites of passage.

    I don't think the point was public school vs. home school, it's letting your 14 child enjoy the things 14 year old children enjoy vs. sending her to college and presumably off to full time work at such a young age. That poster was presumably encouraging the OP to let her kid be a kid, regardless of whether or not it's being a home schooled kid vs. a public (or private school) kid.
  6. Visit  Glycerine82 profile page
    #44 9
    I say let her be 14 and care-free for awhile. She can't truly know yet if she really wants to be a nurse, IMO. There are aspects of this career that 14 year old's will not be able to grasp, nor should they.

    To answer your question, an associate in science transfers towards a BSN in most cases, leaving mostly nursing classes left to complete.
  7. Visit  Emergent profile page
    #45 2
    Quote from Glycerine82
    I say let her be 14 and care-free for awhile. She can't truly know yet if she really wants to be a nurse, IMO. There are aspects of this career that 14 year old's will not be able to grasp, nor should they.

    To answer your question, an associate in science transfers towards a BSN in most cases, leaving mostly nursing classes left to complete.
    I don't know about you, but age 14 for me was a confusing and stressful time of my life. I wonder how anyone can think that the teenage years are stress-free.
  8. Visit  pixierose profile page
    #46 7
    I have an almost 14-year-old and a 15-year-old. It can be a tough age, full of uncertainty and confusing. They're both not the school dance, super involved type of kids -- they are truly introverts, just like mom. And being an introvert at the MS/HS level is difficult, especially in this day and age. However, while hardly "carefree," I can't imagine either of them knowing so firmly what they want to do as a career either. My son doesn't have a clue, and my youngest "likes art" and is choosing her HS Freshman electives based on that.

    But ... that's *MY* kids.

    I think if the OP's daughter is *truly* interested, than the parents can foster the interest by the many suggestions provided by other posters. Make learning a life long process that doesn't have to start at an "official" age; just ensure that it is truly what she wants (i.e., and not what *mom* wants), and tailor it according to developmental appropriateness and what's offered in her area.

    Not every kid out there has fun "being a kid."
  9. Visit  TheAtomicStig_702 profile page
    #47 0
    Quote from Meriwhen
    Forgot to explain that an accelerated BSN program is for students who already have a bachelors--since all the pre-req courses for a bachelors are already done, it focuses more on the nursing courses. However, most accelerated BSN programs still require at least 2 years.
    Hmm..this seems new to me. Schools don't tell you that. And there is no requirement to have a bachelors prior to accelerated nursing school. I thought they just accelerate it because they know you're sick of being in school and respect the fact that you want to hurry up and start working which I'm highly against. I don't know what it was like 10 or 20 years ago, but I have a grudge against quantity over quality that runs deep. A job that handles life and death shouldn't be an education rushing you out of your mind. "You'll be working in a fast pace environment anyway"? Shouldn't hospitals start you off during the night time to train you so it doesn't overwhelm the new employee in training?

    If nursing schools are about pumping grad students out, then hospitals might as well have the quality of care build quality similar to that of a Soviet-made Yugo.
  10. Visit  lemur00 profile page
    #48 6
    Quote from pixierose
    Not every kid out there has fun "being a kid."
    It's true. I was a 45 year old bitter divorcee in a child's body. My dad called me "little grandma". One time we were discussing crazy things kids do, and I noted that I never did any of those things. My dad replied "that's because you were never a kid".
  11. Visit  OrganizedChaos profile page
    #49 3
    Quote from lemur00
    It's true. I was a 45 year old bitter divorcee in a child's body. My dad called me "little grandma". One time we were discussing crazy things kids do, and I noted that I never did any of those things. My dad replied "that's because you were never a kid".
    Same here. I had 1 best friend since 3rd grade, wasn't into the school dances & stuff & never went out to parties. My brother on the other hand, completely opposite of me.
  12. Visit  pixierose profile page
    #50 5
    Quote from TheAtomicStig_702
    Hmm..this seems new to me. Schools don't tell you that. And there is no requirement to have a bachelors prior to accelerated nursing school. I thought they just accelerate it because they know you're sick of being in school and respect the fact that you want to hurry up and start working which I'm highly against. I don't know what it was like 10 or 20 years ago, but I have a grudge against quantity over quality that runs deep. A job that handles life and death shouldn't be an education rushing you out of your mind. "You'll be working in a fast pace environment anyway"? Shouldn't hospitals start you off during the night time to train you so it doesn't overwhelm the new employee in training?

    If nursing schools are about pumping grad students out, then hospitals might as well have the quality of care build quality similar to that of a Soviet-made Yugo.
    I just graduated from an accelerated nursing program. It was only for those who graduated with another bachelor degree but in a different field. All prerequisites, like Micro/AP 1 &2/genetics/etc etc had to be completed with A's prior to entering the program. I'd say the mean age of the program was 28-29, with the youngest being 22 and the oldest 56.

    So no, in my case (and in most cases), the accelerated degree wasn't for students who were "sick" of school already and "respect the fact that you want to hurry up and start working." Many of us were already working to begin with, at least at some point (i.e. I was a school teacher, other classmates were PT's, OTs, waitresses, photographers ... we even had a chiropractor). Some of us already had a Master's degree in another field as well.

    I would have to also say that there was a certain maturity with most of the students; we've BTDT, had already worked professionally, many of us had kids of our own ... no one was taking off to the bars regularly or skipping class for the heck of it, as can be seen in a typical undergrad.

    Do I feel prepared as a new graduate nurse? Not at all. But point me to one new nurse, regardless of program, that truly feels 100%, or even 90%, confident in their abilities. It has nothing to do with my program.
  13. Visit  DeeAngel profile page
    #51 1
    I don't know why you're posting this on a public forum when the only person who can give you an accurate answer are the schools your daughter's interested in attending. This is a nursing forum, we don't know how the schools in your area handle this.

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