ethical delemma(sp?)

  1. I am in the midst of an ethical self battle...I told my boss (CEO of the hospital) last year that I would stay until next licensure inspection which will be in Marc/April. I will graduate next Friday (17th) with my ADN/RN. Now my delemma...I have been offered a position 25 minutes closer to home and $3.00 more an hour...(sigh) I know what I SHOULD do:uhoh21: ...but...What would YOU do?:uhoh21:
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  2. 25 Comments

  3. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I guess it depends on if you really feel keeping your word in this case is important. I can't judge that for you. It's up to you to decide what is the ethical course, and what you can live with or what you need to do. Best wishes!!!
  4. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    Will the better job still be there when you finish your current commitment?
  5. by   explorer
    Quote from emsboss
    I am in the midst of an ethical self battle...I told my boss (CEO of the hospital) last year that I would stay until next licensure inspection which will be in Marc/April. I will graduate next Friday (17th) with my ADN/RN. Now my delemma...I have been offered a position 25 minutes closer to home and $3.00 more an hour...(sigh) I know what I SHOULD do:uhoh21: ...but...What would YOU do?:uhoh21:
    I would go for the better paying job unless your current boss wants to pay your bills.
  6. by   Tweety
    Did this boss pay for your education? Are you obligated to fulfill a time requirement? If not, the closer better paying job sounds like the way to go. Look out for yourself first and foremost. The institution is looking out for themselves and they'll be o.k. But I can understand you wanting fulfill what you said you would do and not burn any bridges. Good luck.
    Last edit by Tweety on Dec 12, '04
  7. by   Brittneesher
    If you do take the other job, most likely your position will be filled.

    However, if you do pass up the offer now and stay at your current job, there is no guarentee you will still have this opportunity when your liscence expires.

    I don't think you should have any hard feelings about taking the offer, because when you promised your current boss that you would stay, you proabably didn't expect an offer this good to arise.

    If your current boss really wants to keep you, tell him the other place pays $3 more and see if he will match it.

    Good luck.
  8. by   emsboss
    Thank You all for your input... It is MUCH appreciated...I will let you know how I decide.
  9. by   HarryPotter
    Quote from emsboss
    I am in the midst of an ethical self battle...I told my boss (CEO of the hospital) last year that I would stay until next licensure inspection which will be in Marc/April. I will graduate next Friday (17th) with my ADN/RN. Now my delemma...I have been offered a position 25 minutes closer to home and $3.00 more an hour...(sigh) I know what I SHOULD do:uhoh21: ...but...What would YOU do?:uhoh21:
    go for the new job. take care of yourself. things change.
  10. by   Mystery5
    I vote for going to your current boss and explaining the new offer. Decide ahead of time what you need to make up for the fact that you will be driving further and spending more time on the road, plus the money difference. Probably he won't be willing to pay it and then you're off the hook.

    If nothing will make up for it, then go to him and tell him of the new offer and your personal need to accept it, emphasizing the terrible travel burden and the hardship it causes you. And remember, most CEO's probably see the worker bees as pawns on the chessboard of their own all important careers and could care less about their personal lives. But the ethical thing would be to, nevertheless, break the news to him personally, since you made this hasty promise.
  11. by   SusanJean
    You need to look at what is best for you in the long run. Having been in a position of management for many yrs., I can say we know and understand that... not to say someone will try to manipulate an employee for their own good.

    If the position you desire will not be there, give your required notice and go. If it will be there, give your present employer a chance to meet the $$ offerred by the new one, then leave if it is not met.

    You have skills, you have education... don't compromise yourself. All you really owe your employer is the 2 wks (or whatever is in the handbook) notice. I don't really see this as an ethical dilemma... and you should not either. Your employer won't. THis is business!!

    SJ
  12. by   traumaRUs
    I know this is probably an unpopular vote but I would fulfill my promise to the first boss. The reason is - that ethics and integrity can't be bought. As a new grad RN - there are (usually) a wide range of jobs to choose from - so I don't think you'll lose out on a good chance later.
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    I gave notice on a per diem jom. They asked the same thing and I stayed. I was told they wanted tmore regular staff and less registry.
    When I arrived at work the first day of JCAHO my unit was closed. Patients had sitters instead of restraints.

    If I had missed an opportunity I would regret it still.
    Employers lay off nurses with little or no notice.

    You know this CEO better than us. How do they treat thier employees? Do they staff well?
    Or do they only staff well when JCAHO comes?

    Will they compensate you for the sacrifice you are making?
  14. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from traumaRUs
    I know this is probably an unpopular vote but I would fulfill my promise to the first boss. The reason is - that ethics and integrity can't be bought. As a new grad RN - there are (usually) a wide range of jobs to choose from - so I don't think you'll lose out on a good chance later.
    I am glad to see I am not alone. I was beginning to think something was wrong w/me. I guess if I made a promise to someone, I would be loathe to break my word, unless they themselves gave me good reason. The OP calls this an ethical dilemma, I think if concerned with being ethical, then one should keep his/her word, if promised.

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