Do you consider it helpful or not to be given a Pt’s attitude during a report?

  1. Or the visiting family members? Do you welcome it or do you find that it prejudice the report (does that make sense?). If you feel that a patients or family demeanor is important to pass along during a report, how do you word it?

    Let's say you neglect to mention that a patient makes derogatory comments to you. The family member watches EVERYTHING you do like a FBI probe notes, names, and all. Would that lack of info matter to you?
    Last edit by Brian S. on Nov 27
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  2. 66 Comments

  3. by   seaofclouds21
    There are some aspects of behavior that I really want to know about in report, such as if a patient is touching staff inappropriately (grabbing or hitting). I also like to have a heads up if their family seems to be watching every little thing we do or if they are upset about something so that I can be prepared that I may have to dedicate more time to that family (explaining things/answering questions/etc). These are things that may impact my shift.
  4. by   MunoRN
    It's not often that the previous nurse's psychosocial assessment and impression of a patient and their family/support system isn't useful, so yes, these are generally things I would find useful to know about.
  5. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from DesiDani
    Or the visiting family members? Do you welcome it or do you find that it prejudice the report (does that make sense?). If you feel that a patients or family demeanor is important to pass along during a report, how do you word it?

    Let's say you neglect to mention that a patient makes derogatory comments to you. The family member watches EVERYTHING you do like a FBI probe notes, names, and all. Would that lack of info matter to you?
    Yes. I do find it helpful to hear and I do tend to pass it on in report. I try to be diplomatic about it most of the time, though. I might describe a pateint's family as "very involved" as opposed to "annoying, irrational pests", for example. The oncoming nurse always understands exactly what I mean.
  6. by   caliotter3
    I found it useful to be told that the resident had a tape recorder hidden in her nightstand drawer that she activated when she turned the call light on.
  7. by   beekee
    Yes, that type of information is important. Sometimes, we get a "second chance" with change of shift. I often will try to approach "challenging" patients/families differently than I might otherwise. Often, I find a new approach and a new nurse helps whatever situation that has arisen. Obviously, some situations aren't going to get better no matter what I (or anyone else) do.

    However, there is a way to phrase this information in report.
    BAD: The shift was utter hell. Patient A is a bombastic arse. Patient B is on the call light incessantly and has ridiculous demands. Patient C is a drug seeker who will do everything in his power to manipulate you.

    And a more constructive way:
    BETTER: Patient A does best with choices (do you want your pills first or your eye drops). Patient B needs some extra TLC and time. It probably is a good idea to set boundaries with Patient C early.
  8. by   JKL33
    I agree that the information is useful, and agree that it should be delivered in a professional manner. There's no need to mock or mimic patients/families or launch into a run-down of everything they've done/said. It's good to think about how best to use this type of information when you're the one on the receiving end, too. I've seen plenty of people start off on the wrong foot the minute they walked into a room because they assumed the situation was going to be difficult. That's no good for nurse or patient. So I guess you could say I take the information into consideration/keep it in mind, but don't let it dictate how my rapport with the patient is going to be.
  9. by   jennylee321
    A good question to ask yourself is what would I hand over if the family is present, because families being there during handover is the way things are headed, at least in peads.
  10. by   TriciaJ
    Quote from jennylee321
    A good question to ask yourself is what would I hand over if the family is present, because families being there during handover is the way things are headed, at least in peads.
    You won't need to describe the family during bedside report because they will be there and their behaviour will speak for itself.
  11. by   Cat365
    I appreciate a heads up. Especially with confusing dynamics or unusual patients.

    For instance I would have appreciated a heads up the other day when I walked into my patient's room expecting a female named "Jane Doe" and saw a person with a full beard. I was sure I had confused the rooms and was in the wrong one.
  12. by   itsybitsy
    I always appreciate any type of report on interactions. It lets me know what I'm in for and who I need to be extra conscientious about. Whether I can ask them to wait a few minutes if they call and they wouldn't mind at all or if even asking them to wait would instill a full blown meltdown. I always say my interactions with parents whether it's, "Everyone [the nurses] have been writing narrative notes on all interactions with parents, as they have been threatening staff" to, "these people call every 5 minutes" to, "this family is so nice, they brought cookies which are in the back".

    I like the same in report. I hate being blindsided.

    On the flip side, nurses can have vastly different experiences within 24 hours. I've have parents who I didn't mind at all and were very appropriate. Then next shift comes, I tell them just that and they are flabbergasted as the experiences they had with the family were horrible. So it can vary nurse to nurse.
  13. by   Davey Do
    In Psych, behavior is a primary indicator of the response to treatment.

    For example, we currently have a manic Bipolar with psychotic features Patient whose axis ii behavior has toned down somewhat to the point that they are not as high maintenance due to the fact that they have been med compliant.
  14. by   NightNerd
    Basically, I like to know what I'm walking into. If there is information I need to have safer and more effective interactions with the patient/family, I'm all for it. However, I don't use report as a chance to vent about patients for the sake of venting, and I don't find it productive to listen to anyone else do it either - at least not when one person is trying to leave and the other is just starting the shift. There's totally a time and a place for it, just... not then.

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