called in sick, nurse manager calling back (inappropriate tactics?) - page 2

by jbaggins

14,665 Views | 67 Comments

My husband and I work together as RNs on the same unit (ICU) and we work the same schedule. No problems on that front so far between us, staff, or management. Neither of us has called in sick since signing on 18 months ago. ... Read More


  1. 3
    I have never heard of such. It sounds as though the NM should have come in anyway even with your sick husband working. Are you all looking for different employment? Sick means sick. I would have ignored all the calls and complained.
    redhead_NURSE98!, Fiona59, and LexRaven like this.
  2. 5
    I am surprised that any facility would hire spouses to work in the same unit as well as the same shift.

    But the NM had no business calling back for any reason short of a disaster. None. And calling the other spouse is really inappropriate.

    Is there no float or agency personel?

    Make that call to the NM's boss.
  3. 4
    Quote from doeRAYmee
    He gave more than enough notice. I wouldn't have answered the phone. If he is sick then he is sick. The nurse manger should have stepped up to the plate and taken an assignment.
    I agree. I took a test not long ago that had a scenario similar to this. It said, "If you were the nurse manager and an employee had to go home sick, what would you do?"

    One choice was, "Take on a patient assignment so the unit is sufficiently staffed."

    Another was, "Start calling staff to come in and cover the unit."

    I chose "take on the patient assignment."

    WRONG! Go figure. I'm not manager material, obviously.
    wooh, KelRN215, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  4. 2
    Union? Hmmm; yes I've worked for those types...it's harassment plain and simple. Now that he caved in both of you will never get rest next time this may happen (if "it" still works there). You had better have a plan on day offs now that "it knows" who caves and who doesn't.

    I've worked at places that do this and places that don't. It seems to me about half will always try to hassle. At least now you know what type of place it is. Also, since someone brought it up, the last place I worked nepotism was rampant. It seemed like every other person was related to the next somehow.
    redhead_NURSE98! and Fiona59 like this.
  5. 22
    Oh, completely off the rails. Why does she even have your cell phone numbers? She has no business texting you, ever. If my boss ever sent me a text message I think I'd "have a cow," as they saying once went. I cannot even conceive of an environment or circumstance in which that would be remotely acceptable.
    Both of you should file separate complaints to HR, in writing.
    (1) It should stipulate that she is not to ever text message you as a route for formal communications again, unless of course the institution is going to pay for the full cost of maintaining the device.
    (2) Further, stipulate that you expect the institution to honor their own call-in policy. Once you call in sick, that's it. No return calls, ever. You are out for the day.
    (3) Lastly, you and your spouse are separate employees. It is not appropriate for her to try to reach one via the other.

    I am outraged on your behalf. I would want her formally reprimanded.
    ChiTownRN5, GrnTea, MzMouse, and 19 others like this.
  6. 0
    I feel for you. It is somewhat unfair that this happened. If a person is sick then he has the right to not answer his phone.
  7. 2
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I agree. I took a test not long ago that had a scenario similar to this. It said, "If you were the nurse manager and an employee had to go home sick, what would you do?"

    One choice was, "Take on a patient assignment so the unit is sufficiently staffed."

    Another was, "Start calling staff to come in and cover the unit."

    I chose "take on the patient assignment."

    WRONG! Go figure. I'm not manager material, obviously.
    Interesting, in our unit, I know that "start calling staff" is the correct answer per the powers that be. What confuses me is why this would be done after one nurse goes home. In my unit, the first correct act would be to simply redistribute the patients. If we happened to have someone on call, maybe they would call them in. For the manager to consider coming in hades would have had to have broken out after a roomful of nurses had been taken out. Okay, not that bad, but we did have a horrible shift, 3 nurses down, babies falling out of the sky with nowhere to land, and with no one to call in and no one else answering the phone (including our manager for the first 3 hours we tried to get ahold of her) she finally came in.

    I'm not manager material either. I am taking a nursing management course for my BSN and as part of our introductions, the instructor wanted to know what we wanted to learn. I wrote that I wanted to learn to understand the many truly mysterious actions my managers have taken over the last 20 years of practice. I'm almost 3/4 of the way through and I am still pretty mystified. Maybe I'm a slow learner.
  8. 0
    Quote from TiffyRN
    Interesting, in our unit, I know that "start calling staff" is the correct answer per the powers that be. What confuses me is why this would be done after one nurse goes home. In my unit, the first correct act would be to simply redistribute the patients. If we happened to have someone on call, maybe they would call them in. For the manager to consider coming in hades would have had to have broken out after a roomful of nurses had been taken out. Okay, not that bad, but we did have a horrible shift, 3 nurses down, babies falling out of the sky with nowhere to land, and with no one to call in and no one else answering the phone (including our manager for the first 3 hours we tried to get ahold of her) she finally came in.

    I'm not manager material either. I am taking a nursing management course for my BSN and as part of our introductions, the instructor wanted to know what we wanted to learn. I wrote that I wanted to learn to understand the many truly mysterious actions my managers have taken over the last 20 years of practice. I'm almost 3/4 of the way through and I am still pretty mystified. Maybe I'm a slow learner.
    My thought is just that after all the time spent calling people and begging them to come in...and the time it takes someone to show up, give report, etc. etc. that I could just do it myself and make it through the shift...however rough it would be...but I was wrong!
  9. 3
    I would never ever ever ever give out my cell number, if I am "On Assignment," they have the land line number to my room. This is harassment, and you guys must be very cordial-because that would not fly with 90% of nurses-especially the Disease Control Nurse!
    KelRN215, Fiona59, and NutmeggeRN like this.
  10. 1
    Just wanted to point out some of us only have cell phones. I don't have a land line.

    Your NM was totally out of line. But make sure your husband is prepared next time the calls in because you KNOW the NM will be calling and harrassing him to come in. That's when you turn your ringer off.

    What do you mean you got tripled?
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.


Top