called in sick, nurse manager calling back (inappropriate tactics?) - pg.2 | allnurses

called in sick, nurse manager calling back (inappropriate tactics?) - page 2

My husband and I work together as RNs on the same unit (ICU) and we work the same schedule. No problems on that front so far between us, staff, or management. Neither of us has called in sick since... Read More

  1. Visit  tyvin profile page
    2
    Union? Hmmm; yes I've worked for those types...it's harassment plain and simple. Now that he caved in both of you will never get rest next time this may happen (if "it" still works there). You had better have a plan on day offs now that "it knows" who caves and who doesn't.

    I've worked at places that do this and places that don't. It seems to me about half will always try to hassle. At least now you know what type of place it is. Also, since someone brought it up, the last place I worked nepotism was rampant. It seemed like every other person was related to the next somehow.
    redhead_NURSE98! and Fiona59 like this.
  2. Visit  BlueDevil,DNP profile page
    22
    Oh, completely off the rails. Why does she even have your cell phone numbers? She has no business texting you, ever. If my boss ever sent me a text message I think I'd "have a cow," as they saying once went. I cannot even conceive of an environment or circumstance in which that would be remotely acceptable.
    Both of you should file separate complaints to HR, in writing.
    (1) It should stipulate that she is not to ever text message you as a route for formal communications again, unless of course the institution is going to pay for the full cost of maintaining the device.
    (2) Further, stipulate that you expect the institution to honor their own call-in policy. Once you call in sick, that's it. No return calls, ever. You are out for the day.
    (3) Lastly, you and your spouse are separate employees. It is not appropriate for her to try to reach one via the other.

    I am outraged on your behalf. I would want her formally reprimanded.
    ChiTownRN5, GrnTea, MzMouse, and 19 others like this.
  3. Visit  amygarside profile page
    0
    I feel for you. It is somewhat unfair that this happened. If a person is sick then he has the right to not answer his phone.
  4. Visit  TiffyRN profile page
    2
    Quote from Ntheboat2
    I agree. I took a test not long ago that had a scenario similar to this. It said, "If you were the nurse manager and an employee had to go home sick, what would you do?"

    One choice was, "Take on a patient assignment so the unit is sufficiently staffed."

    Another was, "Start calling staff to come in and cover the unit."

    I chose "take on the patient assignment."

    WRONG! Go figure. I'm not manager material, obviously.
    Interesting, in our unit, I know that "start calling staff" is the correct answer per the powers that be. What confuses me is why this would be done after one nurse goes home. In my unit, the first correct act would be to simply redistribute the patients. If we happened to have someone on call, maybe they would call them in. For the manager to consider coming in hades would have had to have broken out after a roomful of nurses had been taken out. Okay, not that bad, but we did have a horrible shift, 3 nurses down, babies falling out of the sky with nowhere to land, and with no one to call in and no one else answering the phone (including our manager for the first 3 hours we tried to get ahold of her) she finally came in.

    I'm not manager material either. I am taking a nursing management course for my BSN and as part of our introductions, the instructor wanted to know what we wanted to learn. I wrote that I wanted to learn to understand the many truly mysterious actions my managers have taken over the last 20 years of practice. I'm almost 3/4 of the way through and I am still pretty mystified. Maybe I'm a slow learner.
  5. Visit  Ntheboat2 profile page
    0
    Quote from TiffyRN
    Interesting, in our unit, I know that "start calling staff" is the correct answer per the powers that be. What confuses me is why this would be done after one nurse goes home. In my unit, the first correct act would be to simply redistribute the patients. If we happened to have someone on call, maybe they would call them in. For the manager to consider coming in hades would have had to have broken out after a roomful of nurses had been taken out. Okay, not that bad, but we did have a horrible shift, 3 nurses down, babies falling out of the sky with nowhere to land, and with no one to call in and no one else answering the phone (including our manager for the first 3 hours we tried to get ahold of her) she finally came in.

    I'm not manager material either. I am taking a nursing management course for my BSN and as part of our introductions, the instructor wanted to know what we wanted to learn. I wrote that I wanted to learn to understand the many truly mysterious actions my managers have taken over the last 20 years of practice. I'm almost 3/4 of the way through and I am still pretty mystified. Maybe I'm a slow learner.
    My thought is just that after all the time spent calling people and begging them to come in...and the time it takes someone to show up, give report, etc. etc. that I could just do it myself and make it through the shift...however rough it would be...but I was wrong!
  6. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    3
    I would never ever ever ever give out my cell number, if I am "On Assignment," they have the land line number to my room. This is harassment, and you guys must be very cordial-because that would not fly with 90% of nurses-especially the Disease Control Nurse!
    KelRN215, Fiona59, and NutmeggeRN like this.
  7. Visit  DizzyLizzyNurse profile page
    1
    Just wanted to point out some of us only have cell phones. I don't have a land line.

    Your NM was totally out of line. But make sure your husband is prepared next time the calls in because you KNOW the NM will be calling and harrassing him to come in. That's when you turn your ringer off.

    What do you mean you got tripled?
    redhead_NURSE98! likes this.
  8. Visit  morte profile page
    1
    Three patients. Doesn't sound like an ICU that is well run, nor safe for the patients.
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    Just wanted to point out some of us only have cell phones. I don't have a land line.

    Your NM was totally out of line. But make sure your husband is prepared next time the calls in because you KNOW the NM will be calling and harrassing him to come in. That's when you turn your ringer off.

    What do you mean you got tripled?
    nuangel1 likes this.
  9. Visit  anotherone profile page
    1
    Quote from jbaggins
    My husband and I work together as RNs on the same unit (ICU) and we work the same schedule. No problems on that front so far between us, staff, or management. Neither of us has called in sick since signing on 18 months ago.

    Yesterday, he called in sick for the first time ever (vomiting and diarrhea.) He gave plenty of notice, calling both our nurse manager and charge nurse at midnight. Our shift is 7a-7p.

    At 4am, our NM called my husband. My husband was ill, and could predict that it was a plea to retract his sick day, and decided not to pick up. Then, the NM texted my husband "please call me back asap."

    Ten minutes later, the NM called my cell phone. I of course happened to be finishing my last precious hours of sleep before showing up to work at 7am. I did not pick up! Five minutes later, the NM texted my phone: "please let your husband know to call me. we will need his help at 11. thank you."

    Then, between 0400-0430, NM proceeded to call us BOTH one more time. He proceeded to leave a message on my husband's phone: "we will be needing you to come in as several nurses will be tripled."

    What????!

    My husband did end up going into work (i know, i know ) much to our charge nurse's dismay. It turns out, had he not retracted his sick day, the NM would have ended up coming in to take patients. My husband ended up working while he was sick, and three nurses were tripled anyway (I was one of them.)

    Is this a typical tactic in nursing these days? I feel that this was inappropriate behavior on our NM's part, and can't help but to feel somewhat violated - on my husband's behalf, and that the NM was disturbing my sleep when he knew I would be working in several hours?

    Not sure why I'm posting, just trying to vent and find some solidarity I guess. Thanks
    Where I work we get some pleas and mandated but none as pathetic as this, I suppose. I think by your husband going in , "management" might think he wasn't really that sick. Know what I mean? Not that that matters, but any little thing can set them off in terms of raises, evaluations, lay offs etc...I am not suprised they texted you in order to get a hold of him, but for something like this , they could have left voice messages. If i was getting texts from work , " call asap" repeatedly I would expect it to be something VERY important relating to pt care , otherwise I would expect a message. This is exactly what I feel will become par for the course in nursing. This happened in my retail jobs so why not in nursing?
    SweettartRN likes this.
  10. Visit  beeker profile page
    7
    Don't you have caller Id ? Your husband just reinforced this bad behavior by caving in. Next time ignore the messages and texts, turn your phone off. Now that nm knows they can guilt your fam into coming in, guess what will happen every time now? Not only should your nm know better, but as grown adults you should. Know better than to give in o this type of behavior.
    canoehead, wooh, SweettartRN, and 4 others like this.
  11. Visit  anotherone profile page
    3
    Quote from BostonTerrierLoverRN
    I would never ever ever ever give out my cell number, if I am "On Assignment," they have the land line number to my room. This is harassment, and you guys must be very cordial-because that would not fly with 90% of nurses-especially the Disease Control Nurse!
    I don't have a landline phone. Many people don't. .
  12. Visit  jbaggins profile page
    1
    Thanks everyone for your replies. I feel a little less crazy now. Sometimes it's easy to "get used to" this kind of treatment and to feel like you are being "whiny" for feeling mistreated or any sort of discontent. Our unit nurses are fairly accustomed to being pushed around by our management in this way, and hardly ever complain. Unfortunately, I feel like the NM has some leverage on our situation because he gives us the same schedule. This is valuable to us, as we live an hour away (gas $), and own a secondary business that requires us to have time off together. I know it sounds terrible that he ended up caving to the demands. It all ends up being a little political, doesn't it? We will most likely end up not taking any action with HR for the sake of preserving our personal arrangement and peace. I do feel for other nurses on our unit who do end up being coerced into working overtime and retracting their sick days as a result of these tactics.

    To merlee: there are definitely facilities out there that hire couples and accomodate their scheduling requests, especially when it comes to travelers (which we aren't.) I don't see why it should be a problem when it comes to professional adults.

    Re: cell phones, we don't have a landline, as others have stated. Texting comes with the territory, it's not a big deal. I do prefer receiving a courtesy text to having to pick up a phone when it comes to TB test/mask fitting/in-service reminders, etc.
    Last edit by jbaggins on Nov 13, '12
    BostonTerrierLoverRN likes this.
  13. Visit  BostonTerrierLoverRN profile page
    4
    @anotherone:
    Okay, yes, fail.

    I guess ignore is only way.

    But, I still don't give out my cell to management. I have bought a lil' cheap Nokia Tracfone while with Fastaff, if "on call."

    I just don't want to deal with being called in on "off" days. That is my biggest complaint with most hospitals.

    I'm gullible, and can't say no, or if I can, I still end up being talked into a shift. If I stick by my guns and say no- I feel guilty and crappy, if yes, I feel angry, used, and abused. No Win unless I want the overtime, or a day off and expect I may get cancelled.

    Otherwise I ignore. Cancellation is mostly a hoop dream anyway!!Another plus is I live rural. No service calls is a legible excuse here.

    When they pay my bill, they can have 24 hour access to me.
    Last edit by BostonTerrierLoverRN on Nov 13, '12
    Gold_SJ, GrnTea, IrieVybez, and 1 other like this.


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