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Would manager or HR be impressed?

Hi Everyone... this question is not for me but for a fellow nurse that I know. Would a manager or recruiter be impressed if you told them that you quit your current job just for them (during orientation) ... and that they are your top choice?

Lol, I woudn't think so.

lifelearningrn, BSN, RN

Specializes in School Nursing. Has 6 years experience.

I'm not a nurse but I would be careful with such information.. I mean if you have to put in a 2 week notice than I think the fact that you chose this place over another is evident. If you're not giving notice, I think that might reflect badly as a new hire since they may wonder if you'll do the same if another 'offer' becomes available.

I wouldn't do it just for the sake of 'impressing' them. JMHO

OgopogoLPN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTC/Geriatric.

Hi Everyone... this question is not for me but for a fellow nurse that I know. Would a manager or recruiter be impressed if you told them that you quit your current job just for them (during orientation) ... and that they are your top choice?

I'm confused...your friend is already hired and doing orientation? Then, yes, I guess he/she would have to have quit their old job, so that is not breaking news.

Sure, telling a new employer that they were your top choice couldn't hurt. But in this economy, you need them more than they need you. You are a dime a dozen. Getting a job is the hard part. Don't sound arrogant like you did them a favor by working for them.

Orca, ASN, RN

Specializes in Corrections, psychiatry, rehab, LTC. Has 25 years experience.

In all honesty I wouldn't say that you quit just for them. That may make them believe that they will suffer the same fate as soon as you find some place you like better. Saying that they are your first choice as an employer would be a much better thing to say.

I'm confused...your friend is already hired and doing orientation? Then, yes, I guess he/she would have to have quit their old job, so that is not breaking news.

Sure, telling a new employer that they were your top choice couldn't hurt. But in this economy, you need them more than they need you. You are a dime a dozen. Getting a job is the hard part. Don't sound arrogant like you did them a favor by working for them.

oh, to clarify ... my friend is currently in orientation for telemetry at Hospital A but realizes that she doesn't like it at all. She has connections to a manager at Hospital B for a postpartum opening (which she always wanted) and now she wants to quit her job and pursue Hospital B.

yea... I told her it doesn't sound impressive... :cool:

If by orientation you mean interview, NOT a good idea, whether that place is your top choice, or not, it looks and sounds tachy and disrespectful and give the idea that if another "top choice" comes along in a few months you will quit at the drop of a hat for them also.

Not the best move in the game book , but it may not completely disqualify you for the position.

O and by you and your i mean your friend.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

Telling the new employer their facility was her top choice is nice, but I don't think she should say she quit for them. That sounds kind of flippant as well as a red flag that she might quit again if something else seems better (which of course anyone might, but a person doesn't need to say it at an interview!).

It doesn't look great when you quit DURING orientation. If she really quits and ends up interviewing with hospital B, why would she want to mention that she quit for them? I'd be embarassed to tell an employer that I quit during orientation. I wouldn't even mention it unless they interrogate. I agree with the other posts that it does sound nice that they are her "top choice"

TDCHIM

Specializes in Health Information Management.

Wow.

If anyone's keeping a Top Ten list of prospective-job-related decisions, I'd like to nominate this idea.

Please tell your friend this is a BAD idea.

OP, seriously? A NM wouldn't give a rat's backside.

Hi Everyone... this question is not for me but for a fellow nurse that I know. Would a manager or recruiter be impressed if you told them that you quit your current job just for them (during orientation) ... and that they are your top choice?

Tell them that they are your top choice but the quitting part is another story.

Do not volunteer information that may negatively impact you. Saying that you quit your current job for them might sound like "I might quit this new job if I find another 'better' job".

OP, seriously? A NM wouldn't give a rat's backside.

lol! my friend is quite bold. :p

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

no - sounds like poor nursing judgement

is your friend new to the "real world" ? It's a bad idea to quit like that... your friend is naive :eek: I won't recommend her to say anything unless if they find out that she used to work.

Otessa, BSN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

to the OP-why would you broadcast that??

I would not be impressed by that statement.

otessa

montinurse

Specializes in ICU. Has 10 years experience.

Yep, I agree. With maturity comes knowing that sometimes "saying less is more"

JenniferSews

Specializes in Professional Development Specialist.

As the person hiring I'd hear "I'm so flakey I'll quit if I even have a random interview scheduled." Not the greatest first impression, to put it mildly.

red2003xlt, LPN

Specializes in Addiction / Pain Management. Has 5 years experience.

You never quite a job until the offer letter for the next job is in your procession.

Better yet, wait till your new employee paperwork is sent to you.

FYI:Two weeks was the standard, but that standard went bye-bye about 3 years ago.

Good luck.

Otessa, BSN, RN

Has 19 years experience.

You never quite a job until the offer letter for the next job is in your procession.

Better yet, wait till your new employee paperwork is sent to you.

FYI:Two weeks was the standard, but that standard went bye-bye about 3 years ago.

Good luck.

What is the new standard, is there one ?-my last job had a 4 week policy prior to giving termination notice.

otessa

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