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Why Nurses Are Leaving the Bedside In Droves

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by panurse9999 panurse9999 (Member)

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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On 6/2/2019 at 1:02 PM, Hoosier_RN said:

The 20 year NPs in my area make about 5,000 a year more than new NPs so I am making about 2000 less is all, and for the comparison in liability and hassle, seems to even out.  This pay variance is because of market saturation, and Indiana has a few hospital systems running it, and they own just about every practice through the hospitals.  They call the rates-if you don't want the offered salary, go elsewhere, "Susie" is still working at the bedside and wants the chance to work as an NP and will do it for way less.  For many, moving isn't an option, as we have family obligations and our spouses may have obligations as well.  Market saturation is eventually going to catch up.  Me, I am making 6 figures now.  Again, it's area dependent.

Someone mentioned not getting lunches, since I've changed to this new job, I always get regular breaks.  My cousin who is an NP states when she was in independent practice as well as back with MD, lunches are a bite here and there, running past her desk.  The NPs that work in my area speak to the same.  The ones who have 20 years say years ago, before reimbursements changed, they did take normal breaks.  Not now. Again, this is all area dependent.  I wish all of you who are pursuing NP luck, but there isn't enough money for me to do that.

That is insane. Only 5k? The NP pay ranges for most jobs where I live are 82k on the low end with max pay at about 125-130k. But psych and rehab NPs can make much more.

To be fair, if I were you I wouldn't bother going back for NP either. But I am in my twenties and I don't necessarily want to work another fifteen years with minimal raises and abusive patients in order to top out and make $$$. I also plan on leaving the work force in my very early fifties, so it makes sense for me to maximize my pay as soon as I can. My employer is covering my tuition 100 percent so why not?

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OUxPhys has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology.

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3 minutes ago, ThePrincessBride said:

That is insane. Only 5k? The NP pay ranges for most jobs where I live are 82k on the low end with max pay at about 125-130k. But psych and rehab NPs can make much more.

To be fair, if I were you I wouldn't bother going back for NP either. But I am in my twenties and I don't necessarily want to work another fifteen years with minimal raises and abusive patients in order to top out and make $$$. I also plan on leaving the work force in my very early fifties, so it makes sense for me to maximize my pay as soon as I can. My employer is covering my tuition 100 percent so why not?

If, IF, I were to go back for NP Id do it for something like pain management or rehab. If your employer covers 100% then go for it.

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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1 minute ago, OUxPhys said:

If, IF, I were to go back for NP Id do it for something like pain management or rehab. If your employer covers 100% then go for it.

That is the only reason. If I had to pay for it all, I would reconsider. 

But why pain management? I heard that is a shady specialty.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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14 minutes ago, ThePrincessBride said:

That is insane. Only 5k? The NP pay ranges for most jobs where I live are 82k on the low end with max pay at about 125-130k. But psych and rehab NPs can make much more.

To be fair, if I were you I wouldn't bother going back for NP either. But I am in my twenties and I don't necessarily want to work another fifteen years with minimal raises and abusive patients in order to top out and make $$$. I also plan on leaving the work force in my very early fifties, so it makes sense for me to maximize my pay as soon as I can. My employer is covering my tuition 100 percent so why not?

It's a good plan since your employer is paying 100%.  But read their stipulations before you do it.  The hospital systems in this area (and since it was all of them and they all did the same thing, I thnk they are in cahoots) all did that, the fresh NPs have to work for them for 6 years in whatever capacity they deem necessary

As far as retirement plan, never get married or into a relationship that mixes finances.  I had the same plan with the money I had set back (I inherited some, saved like crazy, etc).  Ex hubby got most of it in divorce, so retirement plans down the drain--and yes, we had separate accounts.  I found out that a judge can do that if s/he wants!

 

 

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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4 minutes ago, Hoosier_RN said:

***

 

 

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OUxPhys has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology.

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14 hours ago, ThePrincessBride said:

That is the only reason. If I had to pay for it all, I would reconsider. 

But why pain management? I heard that is a shady specialty.

I dunno, seems like it would be low-stress. I haven't heard that about pain management but then again I don't really know the good/bad areas of being a NP.

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ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

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19 hours ago, Hoosier_RN said:

It's a good plan since your employer is paying 100%.  But read their stipulations before you do it.  The hospital systems in this area (and since it was all of them and they all did the same thing, I thnk they are in cahoots) all did that, the fresh NPs have to work for them for 6 years in whatever capacity they deem necessary

As far as retirement plan, never get married or into a relationship that mixes finances.  I had the same plan with the money I had set back (I inherited some, saved like crazy, etc).  Ex hubby got most of it in divorce, so retirement plans down the drain--and yes, we had separate accounts.  I found out that a judge can do that if s/he wants!

 

 

No stipulations for now but I imagine that will change.

 

I can't believe that judge let your ex drain you! That is insane. I'm sorry. :(

I have no plans to get legally tied to anyone. Maybe have one or two love kids but marriage? Nah.

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benharold1 has 35 years experience as a BSN.

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I think it is sad that so many bedside nurses feel abandoned by the profession.  I am looking for a less-stressful nursing  or other job that I will enjoy.

I love working and interacting with clients and families but absolutely cannot stand what cooperations and management have done to nurses and patient care.

Anymore, it's all about profit, even for non-profits.  Emphasis is on  improving survey scores by encouraging patient/family perception of great care, not necessarily actual great care. Instead cooperations hire consulting groups as the answer to "training" staff to say "the right thing." Where is the fiscal responsibility in wasting money for concepts they easily could have devised themselves.  Staffing decisions are decided by people who do not have a clue what it takes to care for patients safely and compassionately. 

Nursing Management is often just a cheer-leader for cooperate non-sense and enforces crazy policies that do not ensure better nursing care.

 

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VivaLasViejas has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych.

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Ugh. I remember when the Studer Group came to my hospital. Their recommendations put more and more work on us nurses and turned the place into Disney World. We didn't have scripting, thank God, but we were instructed to make the patients feel like they were in a five-star hotel. The one good thing they did was revamp the entire dietary department, where we had 24-hour meal service and patients could order whatever they wanted off the considerable menu. Dietary aides also brought up the food which relieved us of having to pass trays. But once that duty was removed, we got others in its place, and we lost CNAs and had to clean rooms if housekeeping was busy elsewhere. I left not too long after these changes had been made, and so did several other older nurses who could no longer keep up. Needless to say, I don't have a single good thing to say about the Studer Group or any other consulting firm that works against nurses and regards us as merely "the help". 

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On 5/25/2019 at 12:47 PM, NICU Guy said:

They never wanted to be bedside nurses to begin with. Their plan after nursing school was to get the minimum amount of experience necessary and start on their Masters for NP. As soon as they are done with orientation in their first nursing job, they are signing up for NP classes. 

This is so so true. The amount of nursing student these days that say oh how do you get to be a band six ( charge nurse ) or a NP  or a CNS and this is before they have even written their first end of year paper. The thing is years ago nurses became nurses and that was it apart from the obvious management roles. Then nursing changed and you could be so many different types of , shall I even say,  nurse , that is not at the beside, or you could as is even more so now, progress to medical roles. The options just were not there not so long ago and now for a lot of people they do not want to say oh I am a nurse on a med-surg floor. They want to say I am a nurse manager or a NP or a CNS etc etc. 

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Sounds like they think nurses have no value except for how much work they can get out of one.  You know, I don't mind helping with baths, etc when there is an actually shortage of aides that day, but to spend 40% of my time doing aide work on a regular basis because the regular schedule doesn't allow for the proper number of aides to do the work is just plain dumb.  To my thinking it would be better to give the nurses more patients and have them only do nurse work, but have more aides so the nurse doesn't have to do those things,  wouldn't that work out better financially???  If so, then why not do it?

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10 minutes ago, Forest2 said:

Sounds like they think nurses have no value except for how much work they can get out of one.  You know, I don't mind helping with baths, etc when there is an actually shortage of aides that day, but to spend 40% of my time doing aide work on a regular basis because the regular schedule doesn't allow for the proper number of aides to do the work is just plain dumb.  To my thinking it would be better to give the nurses more patients and have them only do nurse work, but have more aides so the nurse doesn't have to do those things,  wouldn't that work out better financially???  If so, then why not do it?

Nurse work is bathing and answering call lights , toileting etc. There is not just aides work. We as nurses are responsible for all of that. So if it has to be done that 40% 'aide' work it has to be done. That being said I know the struggle when there are not enough aides which is why I love having them. That would probably not work out better financially because the problem you mention would continue to exist except with more staff and more patients. That balance will never be right 

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