Why is A&P so hard?

Posted

Hi, just wondering why people say Human Anatomy and Physiology is so hard. What about it makes it so difficult compared to biology or psychology? Just trying to prepare myself for when I take the course. Thanks! ?

EDIT: also, if you have any advice as to how I can do well with studying, please let me know!

Simplistic

Simplistic

482 Posts

A&P is hard because theres ALOT of information and some of it is hard to understand. I found the workload to be comparable to a biology class. Just say on top of your work and be proactive. If youre struggling with a particular concept, ask your teacher for help. Dont wait until the last minute to get some clarification. Good luck!

SouthpawRN

SouthpawRN

337 Posts

I didn't think it was that hard compared to Microbiology!

I honestly didn't think either class was difficult - and I had worked myself up quite a bit because of everyone telling me how hard it was. It's a lot of information, yes. But (IMO) the information itself was fairly basic. Ours was broken down my system, which I think is fairly common. We were always learning ahead - so we'd do the cardiovascular system in the lab for anatomy and then start the lecture on the cardiovascular system a few weeks later.

I did go to tutoring once a week led by my teacher. She'd have the models out and she's either teach ahead or quiz us if we had an upcoming exam. I took photos of all the models and good notes.

For studying for the anatomy section, I'd take photos of the models and tape them to the extra large index cards. On the photo part, I'd number the things we needed to know. On the back, I'd have the name of the organ or region or part and if we needed to memorize a function, I'd write it.

For lecture I took really good notes, in my own words - I highlight that because I think it's key to connecting ideas on a different level. I didn't want to just regurgitate what my teacher was saying, I wanted to understand it on a deeper level. I used the outlines that my teacher provided along with the lecture, and the things we'd learned before to make those connections and I asked a LOT of questions in class if I couldn't figure things out on my own.

You'll do just fine. Good luck :)

matcha-cat

matcha-cat

136 Posts

ItsThatJenGirl said:
I honestly didn't think either class was difficult - and I had worked myself up quite a bit because of everyone telling me how hard it was. It's a lot of information, yes. But (IMO) the information itself was fairly basic. Ours was broken down my system, which I think is fairly common. We were always learning ahead - so we'd do the cardiovascular system in the lab for anatomy and then start the lecture on the cardiovascular system a few weeks later.

I did go to tutoring once a week led by my teacher. She'd have the models out and she's either teach ahead or quiz us if we had an upcoming exam. I took photos of all the models and good notes.

For studying for the anatomy section, I'd take photos of the models and tape them to the extra large index cards. On the photo part, I'd number the things we needed to know. On the back, I'd have the name of the organ or region or part and if we needed to memorize a function, I'd write it.

For lecture I took really good notes, in my own words - I highlight that because I think it's key to connecting ideas on a different level. I didn't want to just regurgitate what my teacher was saying, I wanted to understand it on a deeper level. I used the outlines that my teacher provided along with the lecture, and the things we'd learned before to make those connections and I asked a LOT of questions in class if I couldn't figure things out on my own.

You'll do just fine. Good luck ?

Haha, thanks for all of the information! That makes me feel a bit better. I tend to be better at understanding the "idea" versus memorizing names/locations/numbers, but that shouldn't be too hard so long as I keep with it. I really appreciate you giving me your personal experience and information about how you studied. :x3:

No problem! Dry memorization is hard for me, too. I also used quizlet a lot. They have stock photos you can use and just practice 10 minutes while you're in the restroom, or waiting in line for something.

neuron

neuron

Has 5 years experience. 551 Posts

It's probably the physiology part. The instructor makes a difference too.

MsLori615

MsLori615

32 Posts

So everyone above has great advice. I would like to add that you can search crash course on Youtube plus use quizlet as well. It helped me with AP I and II.

G019, BSN, RN

Specializes in Ortho. Has 1 years experience. 45 Posts

I agree with the poster above. Crash Course, Khan Academy, Quizlet, and Easy Notecards are all great resources. It will feel like a lot in the beginning but it's mostly memorization.

WestKyKing

WestKyKing

31 Posts

I was scared when I went into A&P 1 at first, just because that's all I heard from people in nursing and outside of nursing was how hard it was. And how many people failed it, but to be honest I would only really study the day before and right on up until I went to take the test, and I passed with an A. Its a lot of information to take it, and I feel like it's a class you want to take along side "Easier" courses. Like I wouldn't take A&P with a very full schedule, nor would I take it with classes that require alot of paper writing and research, because time is key.

What helped me the most was I would record EVERY lecture. And I would play it back while I studied. So it would all be fresh. Write things down, carry highlighters because you're going to turn your textbook into a rainbow. I didn't do study groups only because I worked nights full time, so when I left class it was time for bed, but I heard they really help.

Also, Amazon carries Mosby's Anatomy flashcards in the box set ( at bookstores they are expensive, buy used and save like 30, 40 bucks ).

Remember, time management. Good luck :)

rileowski

rileowski

53 Posts

Just finished A&P I a couple month ago and got an A in the class. It was my first time being exposed to the material but I managed to take it all in and I learned A TON. It requires a lot of studying but if you love A&P (like me) and WANT to learn, all you have to do is put in the time and you'll do fine.

Flashcards are a great tool for anatomy and memorizing things that won't take up a lot of space on a flashcard like cranial nerves, landmarks of bones, functions of certain parts of the brain, etc. Also for anatomy, look at modules outside of class and look at as many pictures as possible. It will all eventually become second nature! However, flashcards aren't that affective when it comes to physiology (in my opinion) because it's not about memorizing, but understanding.

Don't worry too much about taking notes in lecture. You can if you want to, but I found it helpful to pay attention instead of trying to write down everything he said. I would take notes when I read through the chapters in the book as well as from the printed powerpoints my professor handed out. And once I had pages and pages and pages of quality notes, I'd rewrite them a few times before the test so it'd stick better.

I'd also highly recommened Professor Fink on YouTube. He has a whole playlist on Anatomy and a whole playlist on Physiology. I watched his entire physiology playlist and most of his anatomy playlist and I love it! I'm learning so much and I'm going to breeze through A&P II because of him. For his videos, don't take a whole lot of notes. Just pay attention and try to really understand what he is teaching. I take notes on the really important stuff I know I'll need for nursing, like the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone reflex, for example, but for the most part I just soak it in. Remember, the first time you hear something--like when you learn about the different types of tissues in the body--it can get confusing because there is so much new material you learn at once, but the more and more you hear about it, the more it sticks and starts to make sense. Use Professor Fink almost like a cheating tool lol. Listening to his lectures will help you with anything you're stuck on and will get you way ahead of everyone else. Use his lectures in combination with your book and the material your teacher gives out and you'll do fine.

A&P is an essential class for nursing. Study hard and learn a ton and get an A!

Good Luck!

direw0lf

direw0lf, BSN

Has 4 years experience. 1,069 Posts

Sciences weren't hard for me. The nursing classes, where it is not just memorizing and regurgitating facts or thinking formulas like Chemistry, were very hard for me to adjust my brain to at first!!

It helped me to draw A&P, like have you ever seen those ig's that just post about their education and notes? (like @study.meds ) I don't have as much artistic talent but it really helps for me to draw. If you have even less artistic talent than me, try an A&P coloring book!