Jump to content

Who Did NOT Do a Year of Med Surg?

Nurses   (5,179 Views 54 Comments)
by Satori77 Satori77, ADN (Member) Member

Satori77 has 1 years experience as a ADN.

9,586 Profile Views; 515 Posts

You are reading page 2 of Who Did NOT Do a Year of Med Surg?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

ThePrincessBride has 3 years experience and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

1 Article; 2,283 Posts; 55,843 Profile Views

I was hired for a SNF and left after two weeks. Then I got into med-surg and worked nine months full time before going contingent. Did NICU full-time for over three years and now am going contingent in NICU and back to my PRN med-surg job full-time for tuition benefits. 

If you are wanting certain career advancement, med-surg experience is invaluable. But if you want to specialize and stay specialized, then you may not necessarily need it. As someone who has super-specialized AND has med-surg experience, I find my options limitless. But you could get the same benefits with general ICU and step-down experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

RobbiRN has 25 years experience as a RN and specializes in ER.

17 Articles; 195 Posts; 10,696 Profile Views

I worked as a "Nurse Tech" on a Med-Surg unit with a 3/4 RN load while paired with an RN who supervised my work during my second year of an ADN program. ( I already had a BA in another area and this was a pilot program at that time.) When I graduated, I went straight into ICU and on to the ER before the first year was over. Several of our current ER RNs worked as Patient Care Techs along side us while getting their RN degrees, then they came on board at the RN level as soon as they got their licenses.  Our home-grown crew has worked out very well.

Edited by RobbiRN
grammar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

beekindRN is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

43 Posts; 678 Profile Views

I, too, was encouraged to do one year on Med-Surg after graduation. After a lot of soul-searching and speaking with mentors, I'd decided my year an as aid on med-surg was all I wanted. I was luckily hired into an ICU, but made sure they had a fantastic nurse residency program. We have a 16-week orientation with a preceptor and a mentor for when we are on our own. I'm almost done with orientation and loving it. I've had nothing but positive feedback, and not once been told I should go back to med-surg. I felt I'd seen all the basics beforehand as an aid, and now I'm more confident with advanced tasks.

I understand how fortunate I am, but my advice is to go where you're desired. Worst case scenario, talk to your nurse navigator or HR -- they just may be able to bend the rules to keep you on staff in another department. You won't know until you try. Good luck!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

3 Followers; 1,402 Posts; 6,827 Profile Views

I lasted about 8 months with the Med Surg, hating most of it, as I had anticipated. This was many years ago, and I then got into Home Health, which was not as intense as it is now.

From there, I did some LTC with a psych population and several years of outpatient mental health. Then onto Psych NP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

267 Posts; 5,839 Profile Views

I went straight to the OR and never looked back. It's what I wanted and I had a chance so it worked out great for me. (I did work as a nurse tech for 1.5 years while in school on a post surgical floor. )

I can truly say that had I done a year in med surg, I probably wouldn't be a nurse today. I want no part of it and I'm sure I would not have been able to handle it.  I don't know how floor nurses do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kaisu has 2 years experience.

137 Posts; 1,785 Profile Views

I worked 4 months on med/surg and absolutely hated it.  My license was at risk every day and I made the decision to leave.  It's a shame, because at a better hospital, I think I would have not only thrived but perhaps grown to love it.  

That being said, I am still in my second job 2 years later.  I am a hospice nurse and love my job.  I was lucky to land somewhere so suitable.  

I think you should stick it out.  It will open many doors for you and you won't have 2 under 1 year jobs damaging a potentially sterling resume. 

Good luck to you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

dianah has 43 years experience as a ADN and specializes in Cath Lab/Radiology.

2 Followers; 9 Articles; 2,667 Posts; 67,495 Profile Views

I floated in ICU (MICU, SICU, CCU), DOU (stepdown), Med-Surg, Post-Partum, Newborn Nursery for the first 3.5 years after graduating.  Worked in the hospital where I trained.  Gained a wealth of skills and knowledge.  Mind you, this was 1975-1978 (back when we took NCLEX and then waited 6-8 weeks for results, working in the meantime with an Interim Permit [IP]).  Have since worked in other facilities in Cath Lab, ICU, and Radiology. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PeakRN specializes in Adult and pediatric emergency and critical care.

457 Posts; 5,265 Profile Views

I never did med/surg. I wanted ED after school so I applied in enough places to get a job I wanted. I've since moved around a bit but have always stayed in emergency or critical care.

Med/surg is in many ways becoming a specialty in it's own way. Renal floors, spinal floors, transplant floors, and so on are as different from each other as many other specialty areas within the hospital.

There are many areas in which med/surg is of little or no help either for experience or when applying. Both our NICU and OR programs put little value into med/surg because other than simply having a good employment history it has very little to do with working in those areas. Likewise our pediatric floor, PICU, and EDs also place little value beyond a good work history to time on med/surg.

It will be hard to transfer with less than a years experience, especially without some other extenuating circumstance (such as moving to a different region). I don't think that it would hurt to look into a few jobs, especially if they have new to the specialty type training programs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1 Follower; 906 Posts; 6,284 Profile Views

I never worked regular med surg but I worked med-surg oncology. I now work psych. I will most likely stay with this field as it works for me. I don't really want to do any med-surg stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CrunchRN has 25 years experience as a ADN, RN and specializes in Clinical Research, Outpt Women's Health.

1 Follower; 4,188 Posts; 30,284 Profile Views

Clinic and research nursing for 26 years now. It is possible. Never worked acute care as never wanted to.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1 Post; 16 Profile Views

I did SNF, LTAC and Psych before I went to the OR. I know it’s difficult but push through the next 7 months and apply for the first opening you can find in the OR. I only get my patient awake for about 5-10 minutes but it’s the most rewarding position I’ve had. You only get one patient at a time, it is still busy and fast paced and honestly can be stressful but never on my worst day does it compare to the normal day when I had 50 patients and a vent patient all in one night at a snf, but it made me a great nurse with that experience! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Betrnb4 has 26 years experience as a ADN, BSN and specializes in Pediatrics/ Home Care/ HEDIS.

1 Post; 23 Profile Views

I have been nursing for 20+ years. Fortunately, as some of the others have mentioned, I was able to go straight into my area of choice - Pediatrics (unit was med-surg with a focus in Peds Tele/ Cardiology) for 7 years.

Now, all of these years later, I have done NUMEROUS things, including coming back to my first love, kids - as a school nurse... So, should you stick it out??

 I do sometimes wish that I had done Med-Surg first, as my situation changed later in life, and I would have liked to be more well rounded- as far as being in the hospital, to do general nursing travel assignments . But, I have had an interesting career, (Home Health, working contracts and such) and would NOT change it, even though it could appear as job hopping. 

As a new nurse, however, it DOES take about a year to 18 months to get ‘comfortable’ in your new career. So, if you can stick it out for another 7 months, hang in there! It does get better and easier. But, if not, or you feel that your license is at risk, then begin looking for what you want, and start practicing your response for the inevitable interview question... “I see you have only been on the job for about 5/6 months. Why are you looking for a change?”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×