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What a great time to be an LPN

Posted

Specializes in Emergency Nursing. Has 4 years experience.

I felt like writing something positive today!!

1. This poor patient today came into the Emergency room after avoiding her last three dialysis appointments. Her fistula was in her thigh with previous fistulas in both arms. She'd been stuck by 2 other nurses before I entered the room to attempt her IV.

BOO YAH!!! I spent maybe 1 minute looking and found a small, superficial vein right smack dap in the center of her shoulder. I made a bet with the RN who attempted last that I could get a 22G in it- betting it would be bigger than we both expected. uhm... heck yah!!! 22G R shoulder first attempt. tolerated well. Draws and infuses like a champ!

I literally just had another nurse come up and high five me for the awesome IV!

2. I was able to assist with my first central line placement today! Uh, totally cool!!!

3. I took patients as a primary my last 4 hours and recieved major kudos on my assessment.... ahem, "data collection" skills. My RN just followed behind and agreed with my data tacking it as her assessment!

4. I also have a new job interview for work during the weekday to staff several occ health clinics around town. Just me, a PA, and an MA baby! I hope a get that job to compliment my weekend option at the ER.

All day, I've been getting major props and it has felt so great to be an LPN today!

Kudos to us!

Wow, that was a great day. What state do you work in? I did not know they could have lpns in the ER.

Wow awesome ...happy to see a LPN using skills and being the best at it!!!

Wow' date=' that was a great day. What state do you work in? I did not know they could have lpns in the ER.[/quote']

Do anyone know of anyplace that's hiring new LPN in NY?

Way to go on the IV! And awesome job on your ASSESSMENT (yeah, yeah, I know , legally "data collection, but Ill call it as I see it.) I'm glad you had a good day :) Good luck on your interview. That sounds exciting :)

Tina, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, CM, School Nursing. Has 20 years experience.

Yay for you! You really need to go out and treat yourself in some way, even if it's something little like a gooey ice cream sundae. :)

RhandaH, ADN, RN

Has 8 years experience.

High Five :) sounds like an awesome day for an awesome nurse with awesome skills!

Thanks for sharing someting positive

T-Bird78

Has 6 years experience.

Awesome! And where do you live for LPNs to be in the ED?

Thanks for the motivation! :) did you have many years of IV experiences or you're just good like that? I'm a new grad, never done an IV on a real patient before. So I'm quite super nervous. I mean some say visible ones are bad ones, others say visible one are okay. So I'm super confused and never attempted to try. :( any advice?

libran1984, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Nursing. Has 4 years experience.

When I started at the ER at the beginning of 2011, I had only successfully started an IV on 2 people. In Indiana, our license does not have specific restrictions on what we can or cannot do. It is left to the the employer to decide.

I oriented with medics, LPNs, and RNs. Each provided me with insight to getting a good stick. It took me about 15 months before I became really good and eventually became a "go to" nurse for IV starts.

Just last year, I started drawing arterial blood gases and found I'm really good at that too!

Several months ago I was administering Dilaudid and zofran (not at the same time) through a port and this patient was a retired RN. She questioned my ability to administer any kind of parenteral medication. I told her the hospital trains all licensed employees on IV / Port & other various central line administrations. As I thought about it, I went around and asked our ASN & BSN nurses if they spent moderate to extensive time learning how to administer IVP medication and associated skills in their respective programs. All said they learned how to administer the meds at hospital and unit orientation. So it always baffled me when people cite formal education level to administer IVP meds. It's really not that hard or scary. One BSN grad tried to push PO liquid Benadryl. Another BSN told multiple patients that zofran was an antibiotic. LOL. It's not your degree that matters; it's how much you pay attention that makes medication administration so serious.

So always practice within your scope and always do your best!!! Never stop trying to learn

CYoungLPN, LPN

Has 7 years experience.

When I started at the ER at the beginning of 2011, I had only successfully started an IV on 2 people. In Indiana, our license does not have specific restrictions on what we can or cannot do. It is left to the the employer to decide.

I oriented with medics, LPNs, and RNs. Each provided me with insight to getting a good stick. It took me about 15 months before I became really good and eventually became a "go to" nurse for IV starts.

Just last year, I started drawing arterial blood gases and found I'm really good at that too!

Several months ago I was administering Dilaudid and zofran (not at the same time) through a port and this patient was a retired RN. She questioned my ability to administer any kind of parenteral medication. I told her the hospital trains all licensed employees on IV / Port & other various central line administrations. As I thought about it, I went around and asked our ASN & BSN nurses if they spent moderate to extensive time learning how to administer IVP medication and associated skills in their respective programs. All said they learned how to administer the meds at hospital and unit orientation. So it always baffled me when people cite formal education level to administer IVP meds. It's really not that hard or scary. One BSN grad tried to push PO liquid Benadryl. Another BSN told multiple patients that zofran was an antibiotic. LOL. It's not your degree that matters; it's how much you pay attention that makes medication administration so serious.

So always practice within your scope and always do your best!!! Never stop trying to learn

Def. awe-inspiring u sound like a really great nurse

Hopefuldogmom, LVN

Specializes in 4. Has 7 years experience.

When I started at the ER at the beginning of 2011, I had only successfully started an IV on 2 people. In Indiana, our license does not have specific restrictions on what we can or cannot do. It is left to the the employer to decide.

I oriented with medics, LPNs, and RNs. Each provided me with insight to getting a good stick. It took me about 15 months before I became really good and eventually became a "go to" nurse for IV starts.

Just last year, I started drawing arterial blood gases and found I'm really good at that too!

Several months ago I was administering Dilaudid and zofran (not at the same time) through a port and this patient was a retired RN. She questioned my ability to administer any kind of parenteral medication. I told her the hospital trains all licensed employees on IV / Port & other various central line administrations. As I thought about it, I went around and asked our ASN & BSN nurses if they spent moderate to extensive time learning how to administer IVP medication and associated skills in their respective programs. All said they learned how to administer the meds at hospital and unit orientation. So it always baffled me when people cite formal education level to administer IVP meds. It's really not that hard or scary. One BSN grad tried to push PO liquid Benadryl. Another BSN told multiple patients that zofran was an antibiotic. LOL. It's not your degree that matters; it's how much you pay attention that makes medication administration so serious.

So always practice within your scope and always do your best!!! Never stop trying to learn

THANK YOU SO MUCH!!!! For being honest, being positive & telling it like it is!!!! I have been doing IV for about 3 months & I can admit that I suck at it! I try my best & I can't wait to eventually become good at it. Most nurses tell me not to worry & that I too will eventually be good at it. I just push myself so hard & I really do try. The most important thing I have to keep reminding myself is that it is a skill set so with practice, I too will develop this skill. Thank you again!!

shamrokks, ADN, ASN, RN

Specializes in HIV, Psych, GI, Hepatology, Research. Has 10 years experience.

So great to see a positive post. I'm glad you love being a nurse. :up:

CampNurse1

Specializes in Med-Surg, Ortho, Camp. Has 7 years experience.

You go! Great LPNs have saved this RN's butt too many times to count.