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What can I do with my MSN-FNP that doesn't require much patient contact

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FNPStudentLife has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER nurse, FNP student.

1 Article; 3,156 Profile Views; 36 Posts

I know what you might think, why did I start FNP if I don't like contact with patients. The thing is, I didn't feel this way before I started the program. I've been an RN for 3 years, I started FNP because I wanted to get out of bedside. Demanding and understaffed work environment was getting the best of my mental and physical health. I thought it would be different in outpatient setting, since I'd be getting more respect and independence. I did a thorough research about what I'd be doing as an FNP before starting the program, and it seemed really nice, way better than bedside. However, I didn't really know what primary care really was before I started my clinicals. And now I have 4 months before graduating, and I'm realizing that's not really what I want to do. I just can't deal with people. I can't stand when they think that there's a magic pill to fix everything when they don't bother changing their eating habits or adding exercise regimen. Or when they come into the office not knowing what medical conditions they have or what medications they take. It may not be a big deal to many healthcare professionals, but I just cant imagine dealing with this for the rest of my life. Maybe I'm just burned out. I don't know. So, what can I do with my MSN FNP degree that doesn't require much patient contact?

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thinbluelineRN is a MSN, NP and specializes in Corrections, Public Health, Occupational Medicine.

84 Posts; 795 Profile Views

How about looking into working in a specialty. Primary care is tough, patient are complex and non compliant and patient loads are heavy and some of my NP friends even have to chart on the weekends to catch up on charting that they just can't finish at work because they are seeing 30-35 patients a day.

You could also teach. Look into working in corrections ( not everyones cup of tea), occupational medicine, GI specialty, derm  etc.

Goodluck.

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149 Posts; 352 Profile Views

Teach undergrad nursing or work for an insurance company I guess

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LadyT618 has 15 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Home Health, Primary Care.

1 Follower; 621 Posts; 6,598 Profile Views

I say if you have the time and the stamina, go to med school and become a radiologist. You don't have to deal with the bedside that comes with hospital nursing, you definitely get the respect and independence (more than you'd get as an FNP) and as a radiologist, you don't have to really deal with people. It's a win, win, win all around!

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MikeFNPC is a MSN and specializes in FNP.

231 Posts; 6,042 Profile Views

On 2/1/2020 at 1:07 PM, LadyT618 said:

I say if you have the time and the stamina, go to med school and become a radiologist. You don't have to deal with the bedside that comes with hospital nursing, you definitely get the respect and independence (more than you'd get as an FNP) and as a radiologist, you don't have to really deal with people. It's a win, win, win all around!

Ha, time and stamina is a serious understatement.  

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djmatte has 7 years experience as a ADN, MSN, RN, NP.

2 Followers; 914 Posts; 8,061 Profile Views

I hear Ford is hiring. No patients and fairly task oriented job without having to deal with people.  Also imo respectable field where a range of people I know do well there consistently providing for their families. 
 

Jokes aside, while your candor is appreciated, your best bet is to probably stay out of healthcare. Many of us have frustrations with people and the range of situations on why their health isn’t well managed.  That’s where it’s important to have the empathy to tolerate and attempt to work with them to find something that helps. That’s where healthcare is a challenge as we are not just pill dispensers who react using algorithms. Meeting people where they are and finding solutions is where we really make our money. You might actually help only a handful of people at the end of the day, but that alone will make your day. 
 

It’s also important to know yourself and what you can/will do. Research might be a better fit. I hate to push more school, but a PhD might get you that direction more. I don’t recommend education as a nurse or management with your all of 3 years bedside where you categorically qualified your situation as burned out.  That’s the last person I want teaching or leading new nurses. 

Edited by djmatte

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455 Posts; 1,352 Profile Views

I worked with an FNP that worked as a supervising nurse at a public school for students with severe physical needs (trachs, feeding tubes, etc.).  FNP not required for that job.

I worked with another FNP that taught at a jr. college and became the dean of nursing.  FNP not required for that job.

I also worked with other FNPs in LTC that did rounds, H & Ps, gave orders, took care of wounds, etc. 

There are a lot of nursing jobs that you will be qualified to do because you have an MSN, but might not require the FNP.

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FullGlass has 2 years experience as a BSN, MSN, NP and specializes in Adult and Geriatric Primary Care.

8 Followers; 2 Articles; 1,065 Posts; 10,214 Profile Views

You may just be a bit burned out.  I would advise you get some counseling from a trusted NP or doctor mentor.  You would also likely benefit from some psychotherapy.  It's important to create boundaries and not get so personally invested in patients.  I care about my patients, but I don't agonize over whether they follow my advice.  Just focus on what you can control, which is the quailty of care you provide.  After that, it is up to the patient.  

You might also consider a specialty that is not life or death.  For example, sleep medicine.  Very routine, no one is going to die, and the patients are generally very grateful for the help provided.  Urgent Care is another option, because you are just dealing with an acute problem and may never see the patient again.

You are not going to get a teaching job until you get some experience.  I really don't see how you can actually use your FNP if you hate patients.

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KatieMI has 6 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

2 Followers; 1 Article; 2,465 Posts; 42,913 Profile Views

I second sleep medicine 🙂

BTW, with some luck an FNP can work in Interventional Radiology. Just ask a few routine questions, push the needle in, take it out, fill note template, repeat. Patients are frequently sedated/tubed and you might not care about anything else. 

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149 Posts; 352 Profile Views

10 hours ago, KatieMI said:

I second sleep medicine 🙂

BTW, with some luck an FNP can work in Interventional Radiology. Just ask a few routine questions, push the needle in, take it out, fill note template, repeat. Patients are frequently sedated/tubed and you might not care about anything else. 

this is a good idea. Don’t have to talk to peeps much for paras and thoras and such

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306 Posts; 71,760 Profile Views

OP, I get what you are saying.

Ultimately, I want to work in an urgent care position because, quite frankly, I want to "treat them and street them," but getting there usually requires a year or two years in primary care.

In fact, several speciality positions request a "one-year post-graduate experience."

If you are lucky to get a specialty position from the start, great.

If not -

Think of it this way:

You spent (maybe) 6 years as an elementary student.

You spent (maybe) 3 years as a middle student.

You spent (maybe) 4 years as a high school student.

You spent x amount of years as a college student, and now you are about to get your FNP license.

Would it hurt to spend just one more year in primary care before you get into a specialty that usually requires one year of primary care experience as an NP?

How just 6-9 months more in primary care before moving on?

 

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FNPStudentLife has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER nurse, FNP student.

1 Article; 36 Posts; 3,156 Profile Views

Thank you guys for your responses. I do like the idea of working in urgent care. I currently work in ER and I like it because you “treat them and street them”, so maybe urgent care will my goal. Thanks again!

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